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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2012
Frieda Schellhase, who worked alongside her husband at the well-known German restaurant he operated in downtown Baltimore, died of heart failure Oct. 30 at Baltimore-Washington Medical Center. The Annapolis-area resident was 91. Frieda Gause was born in Baltimore and raised on Wilkens Avenue. She was a 1939 Western High School graduate. She met her future husband, Otto Schellhase, at the youth fellowship at St. Luke's Lutheran Church. After their 1941 marriage and raising her two sons, she became a hostess at the family restaurant, Schellhase's at 412 N. Howard St. The restaurant was known for its traditional German menu of sour beef and dumplings, oysters, wiener schnitzel, chilled beer and Maryland rye. The restaurant closed in 1980.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance and Justin George and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
The widow of Baltimore author Tom Clancy is battling her late husband's lawyer over $6 million in taxes she says she shouldn't owe on her share of Clancy's $82 million estate, which includes a World War II tank, a $65 million stake in the Orioles and a mansion on the Chesapeake Bay. Alexandra Clancy is seeking to oust Baltimore lawyer J.W. Thompson "Topper" Webb as executor of Tom Clancy's will, accusing Webb of a mistake that adds unnecessarily to...
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, Yvonne Wenger and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2013
As he lay on the floor of his Southwest Baltimore grocery store, Benjamin Rubin's last words to his wife were "I've been shot. " Moments earlier on that April day in 1972, Welford Monroe and another young man stormed into B&S Food Market, ordered Rubin to empty his pockets and stole $125 from the cash register. Schoolchildren were huddled in the back of the store when Monroe shot Rubin in the chest. On his way out, Monroe turned and fired his gun at Shirley Rubin. She was leaning against a wire newspaper rack to steady herself when the bullet went through her arm and lodged in her hip. Shirley Rubin, now 89, has been forced to confront those memories again with the recent, unexpected release of Monroe.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
Sister Mary Joannes Clifford, a mathematics teacher who spent 53 years at Mercy High School and founded a ministry to the widowed, separated and divorced, died of cardiovascular disease Oct. 30 at her order's retirement home in the Woodbrook. She was 87. Born June Rose Clifford while her family was vacationing in Miami, she was the daughter of Baltimoreans James and Mary Ann Rochlitz Clifford. She was a graduate of the old Mount St. Agnes High School in Mount Washington and attended Trinity College in Washington, D.C., for two years before joining the Sisters of Mercy in 1945.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren and Gerri Kobren,Staff Writer | October 19, 1993
Widowhood came down on Ruth Coughlin in an agony of despair, When her husband, U.S. administrative law judge and novelist William Coughlin, died, she fell into a dark labyrinth in which she could do no more than grope around for most of a year."
NEWS
By New York Times | June 27, 1991
WASHINGTON -- It has taken more than 23 years, but today the Army was scheduled to award the Silver Star to the widow of an Army captain who was killed in Vietnam while risking enemy mortar fire to save his badly outnumbered troops.The award will bring an end to Brenda Reed's emotional campaign of perseverance and devotion to her husband, Capt. James Eddie Reed.The Army has resisted awarding the medal because no one recommended the honor immediately after Reed's death. Reed died during the 1968 Tet offensive.
NEWS
By Newsday | August 15, 1991
The widow of a Marine officer hanged by Lebanese kidnappers in 1989 says she would object to any hostage deal that absolved those responsible for his death.Marine Maj. Robin Higgins, widow of Marine Lt. Col. William Higgins, said yesterday that she feared negotiators would forget the brutal murder of her husband in their efforts to accommodate Shiite extremist kidnappers and forge an overall deal to free hostages in the Middle East."Those people or persons, if you can call them that, who are responsible for this must be brought to justice," she said.
NEWS
October 26, 1994
The widow of a Glen Burnie man filed suit suit yesterday in Anne Arundel Circuit Court alleging that her husband's death was caused by a truck driver's negligence.Roland C. Jenkins, 67, of the 6600 block of Whitmore Court was killed about 6:30 a.m. Nov. 20, 1991, when a tractor-trailer hit him as he crossed the southbound lanes of Ritchie Highway near its intersection with Orchard Road.In the suit, Mr. Jenkins' widow, Frances Jenkins, alleges that William G. Eldrith Sr., the truck driver, was negligent.
FEATURES
By Ben Neihart and Ben Neihart,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 29, 1998
"The Widow Killer," by Pavel Kohout. New York: St. Martin's Press. 400 pages. $24.95. Every publisher claims that the serial-killer thriller they're about to release will detonate in the reader's mind the way Thomas Harris' "Silence of the Lambs" did, but there is no living writer who can duplicate the elegant, single-minded psychological surgery that Harris inflicts on his audience.And every publisher tries to pass off the latest hybrid of serial-killer and historical novel as a commercial juggernaut like Caleb Carr's "The Alienist" - not too scary, not too James Michener.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | February 3, 1995
I don't remember looking forward to the mail delivery as much as I have the last week.Every day promises to be as exciting as Christmas morning or an Easter egg hunt.It began when a nice widow lady in Arizona read about my wife's disgust with my old winter overcoat, a frayed, soiled, grungy garment I have worn for many years.In the nice lady's closet was a splendid blue-black wool overcoat -- virtually new -- that had belonged to her late husband.She said she wanted me to have the coat because her husband had been a fine man and she thought that I was too.It fit perfectly, and my wife and co-workers said I had never worn a coat that made me look so successful and dignified.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2013
Close attention to detail is a good thing in a copy editor. We want the text to be factually accurate, grammatical, and clear. But that attention to detail carries with it the hazard of becoming obsessed with trifles.  Take, for example, the "widow," a short line of only a couple of words at the top of a leg of type, or the "orphan," its counterpart at the bottom. The page would certainly look a little cleaner if the top and bottom of each leg of type filled out the line. But the amount of time involved in recasting sentences to eliminate widows an orphans can be counterproductive, not to mention the risk each editor takes of creating error when rewording text.  Some editors also spend their time pulling pieces of text from one line to the next.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
Isabel H. Klots, an artist and widow of noted portrait painter Trafford P. Klots whose medieval home in Rochefort-en-Terre in Brittany, France, served as a venue for several generations of artists who came there to paint and study, died Thursday from heart failure at Roland Park Place. She was 96. "Isabel was a grande dame, if there ever was one, with a strong sense of absolute authority. Yet she could be very warm and embracing, and she also had a real artist's sensibility," said the celebrated Baltimore painter Raoul Middleman.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, Yvonne Wenger and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2013
As he lay on the floor of his Southwest Baltimore grocery store, Benjamin Rubin's last words to his wife were "I've been shot. " Moments earlier on that April day in 1972, Welford Monroe and another young man stormed into B&S Food Market, ordered Rubin to empty his pockets and stole $125 from the cash register. Schoolchildren were huddled in the back of the store when Monroe shot Rubin in the chest. On his way out, Monroe turned and fired his gun at Shirley Rubin. She was leaning against a wire newspaper rack to steady herself when the bullet went through her arm and lodged in her hip. Shirley Rubin, now 89, has been forced to confront those memories again with the recent, unexpected release of Monroe.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 8, 2013
I suspect my children will want to see me throw myself on my husband's funeral pyre, the better to tie up all the loose ends. But I am certain they would not want me out there and available again. And frankly, the idea of revisiting all that teenage dating angst does seem like an awful lot of work. Just in time for Mother's Day, there is a new book, written by two women who watched their own mothers search for love again in widowhood, called "From Granny Panties to Thongs: The Mourning After.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2013
Sandra Richardson and Bonnita Spikes have much in common. Both live in Upper Marlboro and are churchgoing Christians who have worked in nursing. Both have dealt with the pain of losing people they loved in murders. When it comes to the death penalty, however, the two women are on opposite sides of one of the most divisive issues facing the General Assembly this year. Richardson, 74, hopes to go to Annapolis this week to testify against Gov. Martin O'Malley's effort to end capital punishment in Maryland as she did when the governor made a similar effort four years ago. She'd like to tell lawmakers about her 38-year-old daughter, Lisa Richardson, who was strangled at her Charles County home in 2001 by a man who received a life sentence in a plea bargain.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2012
Frieda Schellhase, who worked alongside her husband at the well-known German restaurant he operated in downtown Baltimore, died of heart failure Oct. 30 at Baltimore-Washington Medical Center. The Annapolis-area resident was 91. Frieda Gause was born in Baltimore and raised on Wilkens Avenue. She was a 1939 Western High School graduate. She met her future husband, Otto Schellhase, at the youth fellowship at St. Luke's Lutheran Church. After their 1941 marriage and raising her two sons, she became a hostess at the family restaurant, Schellhase's at 412 N. Howard St. The restaurant was known for its traditional German menu of sour beef and dumplings, oysters, wiener schnitzel, chilled beer and Maryland rye. The restaurant closed in 1980.
NEWS
By Adam Nossiter and Adam Nossiter,New York Times News Service | September 4, 1993
MONTGOMERY, Ala. -- It was well after midnight one chilly winter 36 years ago. Four white men and one black man stood on the Tyler Goodwin Bridge, in a deserted area near here. Fifty feet below, the Alabama River flowed briskly.The white men were Ku Klux Klansmen. They had driven the black man through the dark countryside, terrorizing him. He had said something offensive to a white woman, they said, and he was going to pay. Now, on the bridge, one Klansman pointed his gun at the young man and said, "Hit the water."
NEWS
April 7, 1994
A Catonsville psychologist's widow has received $41,000 in the settlement of a civil suit she filed against the man responsible for the November 1992 car wreck in Clarksville in which her husband was killed.Howard Circuit Court Judge James Dudley issued the order March 31, settling the suit Theresa Shah filed against William Scott Marcellino of Germantown.Ms. Shah originally sought $12 million in damages in the suit filed in April 1993, alleging that Mr. Marcellino's failure to control his vehicle caused the accident that killed Saleem Alam Shah, 60.Mr.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | July 18, 2012
I think we can all agree the NFL is one of the greatest money-making machines of all time. The 32 teams generated close to $9 billion in revenue last year. Forbes magazine puts the average team's worth at $1 billion. Commissioner Roger Goodell makes $20 million a year. New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees signed a five-year contract worth $100 million. Ray Rice just agreed to a five-year, $40 million deal with the Ravens. I could go on and on. But you get the point. If you're anywhere in the NFL's orbit, you're probably not standing in soup lines.
NEWS
March 7, 2012
Some things I've been wondering about: When willRobert L. Ehrlich Jr.write a coherent column without offending even the widow of the late Ron Smith? What is the difference between asking a bunch of questions and writing a thoughtful column? Does Robert Ehrlich wonder why he was a one-term governor? Paul Douglas, Reisterstown
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