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NEWS
January 8, 2006
Last week, pupils at West minster Elementary School competed in preliminary rounds of the National Geography Bee. The school competition, whose final round is this week and will include both fourth- and fifth-graders, tests pupils' knowledge of the world. The overall winner will try to qualify for the national championship.
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NEWS
By Michael Hill | April 16, 2013
The Boston Marathon resonates deep within my memory. I don't know when, exactly, it got there. My older brother ran distances, gliding around the streets of Atlanta in the days when that meant regular harassment from motorists, long before anyone had heard of the word "jogger. " Few of them knew we had a marathon in Atlanta - it was 10 laps around a golf course - but most had heard about the one in Boston. My brother and I watched delayed coverage on "Wide World of Sports," with Jim McKay telling us of the challenges of Heartbreak Hill.
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SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | May 1, 1991
ABC celebrated 30 years of "Wide World of Sports" on Sunday, and there was only one major fault with the anniversary program -- it was on during the afternoon instead of prime time.The show deserved a wider audience. For one thing, the marriage of music to pictures was among the best in recent memory. Take the opening, for example: a quick run through 30 years accompanied by matching songs -- a young Muhammad Ali celebrating to the sound of "Respect," the Harlem Globetrotters going through a routine while "Don't Worry, Be Happy" played and Connecticut Little Leaguers twisting and shouting to "Glory Days."
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2012
The Loyola men's lacrosse team will face the U.S. national team in the exhibition Champion Challenge, a US Lacrosse event, on Sunday, Jan. 27 at the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. The game will pit the defending NCAA and Federation of International Lacrosse champions in a game that will be broadcast on ESPNU and ESPN3.com. Further details about the event, including a game time, will be released at a later date. "We are very excited about the opportunity to go down to Florida to play against the best of what the United States has to offer," Loyola  ooach Charley Toomey said.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | June 18, 1992
Visitors to Baltimore's Inner Harbor might one day experience the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat -- over and over again.Representatives of ABC Sports in New York, a division of the ABC television network, have expressed strong interest in transforming part of the Pier 4 Power Plant into an elaborate multimedia display about the "Wide World of Sports," based on pTC the long-running TV show.As part of the display, video libraries would show "Wide World of Sports" segments at the push of a button.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | September 11, 1997
One of sports television's most distinctive programs, ABC's "Wide World of Sports," will undergo an expansion and face lift in January, when the show will encompass all of the network's weekend sports programming, save for college and NFL football."
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | January 11, 1996
It's fitting that "Wide World of Sports," which kicks off its 35th season Saturday (Channel 2, 4:30 p.m.) and is television's longest-running anthology series, presents a new host, Robin Roberts, who embodies the kind of variety "Wide World" is known for."Because I've done so many different things in 'SportsCenter' and in my career . . . they [the producers] can throw anything at me and I'll be able to handle it," said Roberts. "In all the conversations I've had with [producer] Curt [Gowdy Jr.]
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | April 26, 1996
ABC's "Wide World of Sports" has been, in the unforgettable words of Jim McKay, "spanning the globe to bring you the constant variety of sports," but the truth is that the show has become the longest-running program in the network's history because, for all its far-flung travel, it is about simplicity."
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | June 18, 1992
Visitors to Baltimore's Inner Harbor might one day experience the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat -- over and over again.Representatives of ABC Sports in New York, a division of the ABC television network, have expressed strong interest in transforming part of the Pier 4 Power Plant into an elaborate multimedia display about the "Wide World of Sports," based on the long-running TV show.As part of the display, video libraries would show "Wide World of Sports" segments at the push of a button.
SPORTS
By Don Markus | September 7, 1991
To the rest of the country, Jim McKay is the man who held overnight vigil in an ABC broadcast booth during the massacre of Israeli athletes at the 1972 Olympics and the man who has traveled the wide world of sports for the past thirtysomething years.But to Maryland, and its horse racing community, Jim McKay is the man who brought a number of previously warring factions together for an event that in its first five years has made an impact both locally and nationally. In many ways, Jim McKay is the Maryland Million.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 8, 2008
Back at the dawn of Baltimore television, when the Sunpapers owned the first station here, a 25-year-old Evening Sun reporter named Jim McManus agreed to work in front of the camera for $65 a week. It was 1947. The station, WMAR-TV, had to fill hours upon hours with original programming. So its crews did remote telecasts, running from the races at Pimlico to supermarket openings to professional wrestling matches at the old Baltimore Coliseum. McManus, a reporter and announcer, didn't care for the pro wrestling assignment.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Candus Thomson and Childs Walker and Candus Thomson,Sun Reporters | May 11, 2007
TOKYO-- --The Boston Red Sox shocked many American fans when they spent $103.1 million on Japanese pitcher Daisuke Matsuzaka. But walk down a street in this city of 12 million wearing a Sox cap and No. 18 jersey and it becomes apparent that the implications of the signing stretch far beyond the mound at Fenway Park. The hat draws smiles, waves, bows, even an offer to buy it then and there. "It is good that [Matsuzaka] was the one chosen to go to the United States," says Osato Nakamura, summing up the spirit of those in Japan.
NEWS
February 21, 2007
ISSUE: Frustrated with the noise outside her apartment complex, Annapolis Alderwoman Julie M. Stankivic is drafting a bill that would subject city cabdrivers to fines for honking their horns when they pick up passengers. Stankivic, who has filed eight complaints in five weeks against cabdrivers, said the city is being "besieged" by the disruption familiar to most city dwellers. She prefers that the drivers use their cell phones to alert fares of their arrival. But Alfred LaGasse, executive vice president of the Taxicab, Limousine & Paratransit Association, a national organization based in Kensington, said he couldn't think of "a city in any place in the whole wide world" that has attempted to ban honking, excessive or otherwise.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | June 1, 2006
Warm summer weather ushers in the city's Showcase of Nations Ethnic Festivals. The 12-festival series kicks off tomorrow with the Polish Festival and wraps up with the Russian Festival in late October. Here's a rundown of each. The Polish Festival runs 4 p.m.-10 p.m. tomorrow, noon-10 p.m. Saturday and 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m. Sunday in Patterson Park, at South Linwood and Eastern avenues. See polka bands, browse crafts and eat traditional Polish foods. Admission is $2 tomorrow and $4 Saturday and Sunday.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER | January 12, 2006
Muttiah Muralitharan is, as far as I can tell, Roger Clemens, Barry Bonds and Jackie Robinson all rolled into one. He's Clemens because he's regarded as perhaps the greatest of all time while still playing near his peak. He's Bonds because many in his sport regard him as a cheater. And he's Robinson because through his athletic excellence he has helped unite a violently divided nation. And I had never heard of him until Tuesday. Muralitharan is a Sri Lankan cricket star regarded by many as the greatest "bowler" of all time.
NEWS
January 8, 2006
Last week, pupils at West minster Elementary School competed in preliminary rounds of the National Geography Bee. The school competition, whose final round is this week and will include both fourth- and fifth-graders, tests pupils' knowledge of the world. The overall winner will try to qualify for the national championship.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 6, 2002
Roone Arledge, the ABC executive who did as much to shape the look of American network television as anyone except its founders, died yesterday of complications from cancer. He was 71. Mr. Arledge was pronounced dead at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, said ABC spokesman Jeffrey Schneider. A 36-time Emmy winner, Mr. Arledge, who retired in 1998, defined thinking outside the box from the moment he arrived at ABC in 1960. Among the groundbreaking programs he introduced in his career - which included a decade as president of the network's news and sports divisions - were Monday Night Football, Wide World of Sports, Nightline and 20/20.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1996
Someday, the networks are going to put a show on Saturday night that is consistently worth watching. Someday.* "Song of Freedom" (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m., WHMM, Channel 32) -- The great Paul Robeson, a man whose beautiful singing and fine acting was woefully underused by Hollywood in the 1930s and '40s, stars as a singer who gives up a career in opera to work with a tribe in Africa.* "Wide World of Sports" (4:30 p.m.-6 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- You're not going to believe what they're showing on "Wide World" this week.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 24, 2003
Jim McKay: My World in My Words, an HBO documentary on the life of the legendary sportscaster, is at its best when it gets personal, very personal - as in his relationship with his wife, Margaret. There's the story about how McKay's hands began shaking uncontrollably one Sunday morning in 1960 while trying to read a newspaper. It was the start of what Margaret describes as a "regular nervous breakdown." As McKay becomes more isolated and withdrawn, she is the one who finds a psychiatrist, takes McKay to meet the doctor and puts her husband on the road to recovery.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 6, 2002
Roone Arledge, the ABC executive who did as much to shape the look of American network television as anyone except its founders, died yesterday of complications from cancer. He was 71. Mr. Arledge was pronounced dead at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, said ABC spokesman Jeffrey Schneider. A 36-time Emmy winner, Mr. Arledge, who retired in 1998, defined thinking outside the box from the moment he arrived at ABC in 1960. Among the groundbreaking programs he introduced in his career - which included a decade as president of the network's news and sports divisions - were Monday Night Football, Wide World of Sports, Nightline and 20/20.
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