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Whooping Cranes

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NEWS
By Keith Paul | July 9, 1991
For the first time, a pair of endangered whooping cranes have produced a chick in captivity without the help of humans.The rare bird was born April 27 at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel and has grown to 3 1/2 feet and 8 pounds, officials of the center said yesterday.The birth announcement was delayed until the center was sure the chick would survive.Coaxing the whooping cranes to reproduce naturally in captivity has been difficult, because researchers haven't known what the birds need for normal mating, said Kathleen O'Malley, an animal caretaker who is raising the newborn.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2012
Just as it can with human couples, sharing a good meal apparently sparks thoughts of love among whooping cranes. The stately, endangered birds at Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel are being primed by their keepers for another season of carefully orchestrated mating with a "special breeder diet. " No chocolate or oysters, though, just subtly enriched pellets of the cranes' usual prepared bird food. "We give them a little more calcium, a little more protein," said Jonathan Male, who supervises the center's whooping crane propagation effort.
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SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | December 21, 2008
Turns out the person who said, "What's good for the goose is good for the gander," stopped a few feathers short of a pillow. Apparently, what's good for the whooping cranes that live in Laurel also is good for ducks that hang out in Maryland. Which is why Ducks Unlimited is helping to pay for some serious-looking bulldozers to dig a 7-acre shallow pit at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Refuge that will fill with water. The $70,000 hole in the ground will be used by scientists raising endangered baby whoopers as an aquatic center to train captive birds to act naturally.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | December 21, 2008
Turns out the person who said, "What's good for the goose is good for the gander," stopped a few feathers short of a pillow. Apparently, what's good for the whooping cranes that live in Laurel also is good for ducks that hang out in Maryland. Which is why Ducks Unlimited is helping to pay for some serious-looking bulldozers to dig a 7-acre shallow pit at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Refuge that will fill with water. The $70,000 hole in the ground will be used by scientists raising endangered baby whoopers as an aquatic center to train captive birds to act naturally.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 7, 2007
MIAMI -- The fate of a generation of endangered migratory whooping cranes now rides on the fragile wings of a 10-month-old chick known as No. 15. He is the sole survivor of the Class of 2006, 18 crane hatchlings that followed four costumed ultra-light aircraft from Wisconsin to Florida wintering grounds in December as part of a project to introduce a second migrating population to North America. Conservationists with Operation Migration had originally feared all of the brood had perished in the storm that killed 20 people in central Florida on Friday and put hundreds of residents from their homes.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | May 27, 1992
When it comes to training whooping cranes to be good mothers, 67-year-old Lloyd Lindvall uses wood.The Columbia resident makes hand-carved wooden eggs, which are placed in whooping cranes' nests as a substitute for their real eggs. The real eggs are removed and incubated at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel.The substitution prevents the endangered species from breaking and eating the eggs, which they often do, experts say."It sounds ridiculous. It is ridiculous, but birds are sometimes odd," Lindvall said.
NEWS
By Bernice Wuethrich and Bernice Wuethrich,Contributing Writer | January 4, 1993
Whooping cranes raised in captivity in Maryland and Wisconsin will be the first whoopers bred by man to be sent into the wild when a dozen are released this week on the meadows of Florida.The 12 whooping crane youngsters -- bred at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center and the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, Wis. -- are set to emerge from their wooden crates onto Kissimee Prairie Wednesday.The wild flock of whooping cranes, which numbered 14 a little more than a half-century ago, has grown to about 135."
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2004
There was good news and bad news yesterday involving some of Maryland's most closely watched exotic animals. The bad news was the death of a rare, injured whooping crane brought last month for treatment to the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. The good news is that Bob, a 26-year-old bottlenose dolphin brought to Baltimore last year on loan from Disney's Living Seas exhibit in Orlando, continues to improve after falling critically ill at the National Aquarium. The male crane was shot by hunters in Kansas on Nov. 6 as it was traveling with a flock of about 200 birds that migrate each year between Wood Buffalo National Park in Canada and wintering grounds 2,700 miles away on the Texas Gulf Coast.
NEWS
By ABIGAIL TUCKER and ABIGAIL TUCKER,SUN REPORTER | April 12, 2006
Black sky. Blue lightning. White birds - white as the nearly two feet of snow that fell on the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center that night, the flakes as big as feathers. The worst part of the storm hit after sunset, a scene ripped from an ornithologist's nightmare. Layers of ice and snow settled on the mesh roofs of more than a hundred whooping crane pens, which, as hours passed, began to droop and tear. Then, as though in answer to the eerie lightning, thunder: the sound of nets collapsing, one after another, and of tons of snow dumping on the heads of the rarest birds in the world.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2001
LAUREL - The small bird appears first, a gawky whooping crane chick with a long, skinny neck and legs. Right behind is a nearly 6-foot tall, white-robed mammal with a long snout, offering the baby crane a steady diet of mealworms. The small crane sees a parent figure. But the figure is actually a man in a white costume, taking the first step in the fight to save one of the most endangered bird species in the world. This is the first stage of training - they call it "avian ground school" at the U.S. Geological Survey's Patuxent Wildlife Research Center - in the effort to create a migrating flock of whooping cranes.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 7, 2007
MIAMI -- The fate of a generation of endangered migratory whooping cranes now rides on the fragile wings of a 10-month-old chick known as No. 15. He is the sole survivor of the Class of 2006, 18 crane hatchlings that followed four costumed ultra-light aircraft from Wisconsin to Florida wintering grounds in December as part of a project to introduce a second migrating population to North America. Conservationists with Operation Migration had originally feared all of the brood had perished in the storm that killed 20 people in central Florida on Friday and put hundreds of residents from their homes.
NEWS
By ABIGAIL TUCKER and ABIGAIL TUCKER,SUN REPORTER | April 12, 2006
Black sky. Blue lightning. White birds - white as the nearly two feet of snow that fell on the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center that night, the flakes as big as feathers. The worst part of the storm hit after sunset, a scene ripped from an ornithologist's nightmare. Layers of ice and snow settled on the mesh roofs of more than a hundred whooping crane pens, which, as hours passed, began to droop and tear. Then, as though in answer to the eerie lightning, thunder: the sound of nets collapsing, one after another, and of tons of snow dumping on the heads of the rarest birds in the world.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2004
There was good news and bad news yesterday involving some of Maryland's most closely watched exotic animals. The bad news was the death of a rare, injured whooping crane brought last month for treatment to the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. The good news is that Bob, a 26-year-old bottlenose dolphin brought to Baltimore last year on loan from Disney's Living Seas exhibit in Orlando, continues to improve after falling critically ill at the National Aquarium. The male crane was shot by hunters in Kansas on Nov. 6 as it was traveling with a flock of about 200 birds that migrate each year between Wood Buffalo National Park in Canada and wintering grounds 2,700 miles away on the Texas Gulf Coast.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2004
Crane experts at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Maryland are preparing for the arrival next week of an adult whooping crane, one of two shot by Kansas hunters last week during the endangered birds' annual southward migration. The crane's right wing was broken by the shotgun blast. Veterinarians at Kansas State University had hoped to put the bird on a commercial flight to Maryland yesterday to undergo rehabilitation at Patuxent, but the transfer was delayed because the crane was too weak to make the 10-hour trip.
NEWS
By Scott Gold and Scott Gold,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 5, 2004
BLACKJACK POINT, Texas - Tommy Moore deftly guides his tour boat through the shallows of Aransas Bay. A sixth-generation Texan with rosy cheeks and an easy smile, Moore has an uncanny ability to spot wildlife both rare and common from his perch on the Skimmer's upper deck, and on this excursion, he has plenty of chances to show off. There are laughing gulls and herring gulls, brown pelicans and white pelicans, a hawk carrying a snake in its talons and...
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2001
WARRENTON, Va. - Ten caged Canada geese are dangling atop a flagpole here, getting ready to explore a question that sounds as silly as the strung-up waterfowl look: Can birds learn to migrate without flapping their wings? Even a birdbrain knows they've got to flap to fly the hundreds and thousands of miles between their summer and winter homes. That is, unless they hitch a ride on a huge helium balloon. In an offbeat but earnest scientific experiment that could take flight as early as this weekend from a polo field in Castleton, in central Virginia, pilots will try to fly the balloon about 170 miles south with the 10 geese hanging off the gondola in cages.
NEWS
By Scott Gold and Scott Gold,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 5, 2004
BLACKJACK POINT, Texas - Tommy Moore deftly guides his tour boat through the shallows of Aransas Bay. A sixth-generation Texan with rosy cheeks and an easy smile, Moore has an uncanny ability to spot wildlife both rare and common from his perch on the Skimmer's upper deck, and on this excursion, he has plenty of chances to show off. There are laughing gulls and herring gulls, brown pelicans and white pelicans, a hawk carrying a snake in its talons and...
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2004
Crane experts at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Maryland are preparing for the arrival next week of an adult whooping crane, one of two shot by Kansas hunters last week during the endangered birds' annual southward migration. The crane's right wing was broken by the shotgun blast. Veterinarians at Kansas State University had hoped to put the bird on a commercial flight to Maryland yesterday to undergo rehabilitation at Patuxent, but the transfer was delayed because the crane was too weak to make the 10-hour trip.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2001
LAUREL - The small bird appears first, a gawky whooping crane chick with a long, skinny neck and legs. Right behind is a nearly 6-foot tall, white-robed mammal with a long snout, offering the baby crane a steady diet of mealworms. The small crane sees a parent figure. But the figure is actually a man in a white costume, taking the first step in the fight to save one of the most endangered bird species in the world. This is the first stage of training - they call it "avian ground school" at the U.S. Geological Survey's Patuxent Wildlife Research Center - in the effort to create a migrating flock of whooping cranes.
FEATURES
By TOM HORTON | January 28, 1996
Sonoran Desert, Arizona -- It gets so hot here the resident buzzards have evolved to pee down their legs for evaporative cooling, one of many adaptations among desert life. And so, with the sun scarcely up, Dave Ellis already has broken camp and served our breakfast -- a gallon of pear halves in heavy syrup -- on the dust-caked hood of a pickup, and now is charging hard through the fleeting cool down Route 238 toward the distant Picacho Mountains.This is Day 10 of the damnedest caravan to enter the Southwest since the conquistadors: an experimental, 400-mile "migration" last autumn of 10 silver-gray birds, painstakingly reared in Maryland to consider a surplus Army ambulance from Fort Meade their mother.
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