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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
Even if Caryn Elaine Johnson had never changed her name to Whoopi Goldberg, chances are she would have made a splash. Talent will out. The 56-year-old Goldberg, who will offer a sampling of that talent at the Modell Performing Arts Center at the Lyric on Saturday, has distinguished herself in a variety of endeavors. She's one of only about a dozen people who can adorn a mantelpiece with an Oscar, a Tony, a Grammy and an Emmy — make that two Emmys. She shared one of those Emmys with fellow co-hosts of "The View," the popular daytime TV show.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
Like Gertude Berg, creator of "The Goldbergs," Moms Mabley is one of those remarkable women artists of the first half of the 20th century who never achieved the mainstream status and success her talent deserved. If you don't know who she is, I urge you to check out "Whoopi Goldberg Presents Moms Mabley" tonight at 9 on HBO. You can get a taste of it from my podcast preview for Baltimore's WYPR (88.1 FM). Born in 1897, Mabley's career spans vaudeville to television, though like many black performers, she was kept off TV until the civil rights movement opened some doors on Network Row near the end of her career.
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NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | July 27, 1993
Berlin -- At dinnertime a few nights ago, my wife and I stopped by the Moscau Restaurant, the place on Karl Marx Allee where East Berlin's communist elite would meet for a treat. The giant Sputnik was still on the roof and, in fact, the restaurant looked better than it used to -- candles, crisp linens and gleaming samovars made the main room more inviting than it ever was in the bad old days.But no one was there. A lone waitress looked across the room at us, longingly. We shook our heads.
NEWS
By Amanda Yeager, ayeager@tribune.com | October 10, 2013
Howard Community College's Arts Collective will host a musical revue by former HCC student Jason Downs and other alums this weekend. The show, "Why Am I Not Famous?" is a comical exploration of fame and celebrity by Downs, who in his 30-year show-business career has performed on Saturday Night Live, acted in movies next to Whoopi Goldberg and Neil Patrick Harris, attended the Oscars and snagged a record deal. There will only be two performances of the revue, on Oct. 11 and 12 at 8 p.m. in HCC's Horowitze Center Studio Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 29, 1992
Whoopi Goldberg could probably light the state of Alaska in December all by her lonesome. She'd melt the glaciers, wake the bears, cause the salmon and the teen-agers to spawn. And she '' lights up the otherwise pallid "Sister Act" just as ferociously.This movie is really a Whoopi-cushion. Primitive, unsophisticated, utterly predictable, it simply offers a pretext for Whoopi magic, and it's at its worst when it's laboring wheezily to set its star up. The plot mechanics desperately need a lube job.Whoopi plays a slightly tarnished Reno lounge singer named Deloris Von Cartier, with a big voice, tall hair and a wardrobe that's a nova of glitter, sequin and joyous bad taste; she's a clone of a Xerox of a fax of a photo of a sketch of Diana Ross, just barely riding a wave of Motown nostalgia to cling to a gig in the slums of showbiz.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | August 11, 2008
HAPPINESS IS having a large, loving, caring, close-knit family in another city," said George Burns. Well, our friend Whoopi Goldberg has knocked the Broadway musical Xanadu up several big notches. It is finally getting the responsive audiences it deserves. Even Variety took notice last week of how the Whoop put the whoopee into this Tony-nominated, but sometimes neglected and enjoyable, romp. She'll be rolling around onstage at the Helen Hayes Theatre through Sept. 7. Cafe reopening I ran into the genial, good-hearted Drew Nieporent - restaurateur extraordinary - while sitting on a park bench waiting to enter Mayor Michael Bloomberg's party for Sen. Hillary Clinton.
FEATURES
By David J. Fox and David J. Fox,Los Angeles Times | February 8, 1994
Whoopi Goldberg has been named host of this year's Academy Awards show, ending a difficult search to replace its previous popular emcee, Billy Crystal.Once Mr. Crystal declined to front this year's event for a fifth straight year, one of the biggest guessing games in Hollywood was who producer Gil Cates would call upon. Mr. Cates was mum and would not confirm reports that such entertainers as Bette Midler, Johnny Carson, Tom Hanks and Steve Martin had also declined.Through her publicist, Ms. Goldberg said Sunday she is "thrilled about my date with Oscar.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 29, 1992
Whoopi Goldberg could probably light the state of Alaska in December all by her lonesome. She'd melt the glaciers, wake the bears, cause the salmon and the teen-agers to spawn. And she '' lights up the otherwise pallid "Sister Act" just as ferociously.This movie is really a Whoopi-cushion. Primitive, unsophisticated, utterly predictable, it simply offers a pretext for Whoopi magic, and it's at its worst when it's laboring wheezily to set its star up. The plot mechanics desperately need a lube job.Whoopi plays a slightly tarnished Reno lounge singer named Deloris Von Cartier, with a big voice, tall hair and a wardrobe that's a nova of glitter, sequin and joyous bad taste; she's a clone of a Xerox of a fax of a photo of a sketch of Diana Ross, just barely riding a wave of Motown nostalgia to cling to a gig in the slums of showbiz.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | May 31, 1996
"Eddie" has great laughs, a charismatic star, a charming supporting cast and even a little thrilling basketball. Unfortunately, its plot is lacking.There's a plot, of course, but like any Sports Movie, it's pretty obvious. Losers become winners. And the obligatory obstacle -- involving the team's greedy owner -- is pretty contrived.So, are you here for laughs or for a story? If you've come for laughs, Whoopi Goldberg delivers as Eddie, a dedicated and wonderfully obnoxious New York Knicks fan who is discovered by the team's new owner, Wild Bill (Frank Langella)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 22, 2000
"Strong Medicine," a new medical drama starring Janine Turner ("Northern Exposure") and Rosa Blasi ("Noriega: God's Favorite"), is the best series pilot I've ever seen on the Lifetime cable channel. Don't get excited. That's not necessarily as great as it might seem: A) Lifetime has not had much success with regular weekly series. B) A good pilot does not necessarily make for a great series, especially one as dependent on the guest star as this is. The pilot is worth going out of your way to see tomorrow mainly for the performance of Whoopi Goldberg.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
Even if Caryn Elaine Johnson had never changed her name to Whoopi Goldberg, chances are she would have made a splash. Talent will out. The 56-year-old Goldberg, who will offer a sampling of that talent at the Modell Performing Arts Center at the Lyric on Saturday, has distinguished herself in a variety of endeavors. She's one of only about a dozen people who can adorn a mantelpiece with an Oscar, a Tony, a Grammy and an Emmy — make that two Emmys. She shared one of those Emmys with fellow co-hosts of "The View," the popular daytime TV show.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | August 11, 2008
HAPPINESS IS having a large, loving, caring, close-knit family in another city," said George Burns. Well, our friend Whoopi Goldberg has knocked the Broadway musical Xanadu up several big notches. It is finally getting the responsive audiences it deserves. Even Variety took notice last week of how the Whoop put the whoopee into this Tony-nominated, but sometimes neglected and enjoyable, romp. She'll be rolling around onstage at the Helen Hayes Theatre through Sept. 7. Cafe reopening I ran into the genial, good-hearted Drew Nieporent - restaurateur extraordinary - while sitting on a park bench waiting to enter Mayor Michael Bloomberg's party for Sen. Hillary Clinton.
FEATURES
By Tribune Media Services | December 17, 2007
WHAT WE generically call Broadway covered itself with glory last week when Bernadette Peters and Glenn Close tossed a real showbiz party to celebrate John Travolta's performance playing a woman in the hit film Hair- spray. And now with awards season upon us, there is hope for an Oscar nod in John's direction. Hairspray producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron were also honorees. They are men who constantly seek to celebrate the triumphs of The Great White Way by taking its material to the screen.
FEATURES
By Matea Gold and Maria Elena Fernandez and Matea Gold and Maria Elena Fernandez,Los Angeles Times | August 2, 2007
NEW YORK -- It's Whoopi time! Barbara Walters announced yesterday that Whoopi Goldberg will replace Rosie O'Donnell as a moderator on The View when the daytime show's 11th season premieres Sept. 4. The addition of Goldberg to The View should guarantee the ABC daytime talk show a regular source of controversy and salty humor, ingredients that helped lift the program's ratings during O'Donnell's provocative tenure. Goldberg jogged down the aisle of the New York studio, slapping hands with the audience, when the announcement was made live on the air. "I love this show," said Goldberg, one of few performers to win an Oscar, Emmy, Tony and Grammy award.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2007
Whoopi Goldberg Comedian Whoopi Goldberg comes to Baltimore, stopping at the Lyric Opera House on Saturday night at 8. Goldberg's portfolio includes her Oscar-winning performance in Ghost and roles in The Color Purple and Sister Act. Tickets are $50-$65. The Lyric is at 140 W. Mount Royal Ave. Call 410-685-5086. On Sunday night at 7, she's at DAR Constitution Hall, 18th and D streets Northwest, Washington. Tickets are $45-$67.50. Tickets for both shows are available through Ticketmaster at 410-547-SEAT or ticketmaster.
ENTERTAINMENT
By NATHAN M. PITTS | September 21, 2006
JUST ANNOUNCED Lionel Richie -- DAR Constitution Hall in Washington on Nov. 3. Tickets go on sale at 10 a.m. Saturday. 410-547-SEAT or ticketmaster.com. Eric Clapton -- Verizon Center in Washington on Oct. 10. 410-547-SEAT or ticketmaster.com. Several Species -- Recher Theatre in Towson on Nov. 10-11. 410-547-SEAT or ticketmaster.com. Lowen and Navarro -- Rams Head Tavern in Annapolis on Oct. 26-27. 410-268-4545 or ramsheadtavern.com. Steve Winwood -- Warner Theatre in Washington on Oct. 9. 410-547-SEAT or ticketmaster.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 18, 1996
It's easy to tell that actress Uta Hagen is an excellent teacher.She fervently imparts information and opinions on subjects ranging from theater as a religious vocation to blacklisting in the McCarthy era to psychoanalysis.Described in People magazine earlier this year as "arguably America's greatest living stage actress" and listed in a recent issue of Theater Week as one of the top 10 female stars of the year, Hagen, 77, has never become a household name, probably because she has shunned movies and favored the stage.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | December 20, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Edward Kennedy, D-Mass., who has never met a domestic federal program he would not double, hit upon what seemed like a great idea for advertising the virtues of federal welfare programs.He invited Whoopi Goldberg -- one of America's most famous former welfare mothers -- to the Capitol to make a pitch for Aid to Families With Dependent Children.Not for Mr. Kennedy and Ms. Goldberg the usual staid style of congressional testimony. Instead, Whoopi put on a Phil Donahue-style show complete with cordless mike and invited guests.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 24, 2004
Stories about performers who risk controversy and reach for the edge on network television seldom end happily. "But, so far, so good," says Whoopi Goldberg of her experience as star and executive producer of Whoopi, a multi-ethnic and politically charged NBC sitcom that dares to tackle issues and attitudes that even cable TV avoids. The show, which airs tonight at 8, features Goldberg as Mavis Rae, a cranky, chain-smoking owner of a small Manhattan hotel who speaks her mind whether discussing President Bush, her Iranian concierge (Omid Djalili)
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