Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWhoopi
IN THE NEWS

Whoopi

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | August 23, 1991
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* There is humor that is universal, and then there is humor that is apparently best appreciated from a particular point of view that others cannot share. Whoopi Goldberg manages to offer both kinds in her latest cable special, "HBO Comedy Hour: Chez Whoopi," which premieres at 10:30 p.m. tomorrow on the premium service.The show was taped at the Comedy Act Theater in Los Angeles, which HBO identifies as the area's only all-black comedy outlet -- and the locale is important to the tone of the show.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
Like Gertude Berg, creator of "The Goldbergs," Moms Mabley is one of those remarkable women artists of the first half of the 20th century who never achieved the mainstream status and success her talent deserved. If you don't know who she is, I urge you to check out "Whoopi Goldberg Presents Moms Mabley" tonight at 9 on HBO. You can get a taste of it from my podcast preview for Baltimore's WYPR (88.1 FM). Born in 1897, Mabley's career spans vaudeville to television, though like many black performers, she was kept off TV until the civil rights movement opened some doors on Network Row near the end of her career.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Orange County Register | May 26, 1993
Hollywood is populated by more than a few thin-skinned actors who protect their privacy more than they do their money.Nobody talks to Tom Cruise without first signing a release promising that you won't ask touchy questions. Ask Jodie Foster a toughie and she'll cut out your heart. Other actresses have been known to walk out on interviews when they didn't like the line of questioning.So publicists from Warner Bros. understandably were queasy when Ted Danson and Whoopi Goldberg were about to meet the press to publicize their movie, "Made in America," which opens Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
Even if Caryn Elaine Johnson had never changed her name to Whoopi Goldberg, chances are she would have made a splash. Talent will out. The 56-year-old Goldberg, who will offer a sampling of that talent at the Modell Performing Arts Center at the Lyric on Saturday, has distinguished herself in a variety of endeavors. She's one of only about a dozen people who can adorn a mantelpiece with an Oscar, a Tony, a Grammy and an Emmy — make that two Emmys. She shared one of those Emmys with fellow co-hosts of "The View," the popular daytime TV show.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 4, 2003
The on-screen arrival of the Boomerang Generation is not the only trend of the new fall season. While not as widespread, another theme that will be explored in several series involves multi-ethnic households - with an emphasis on the humor of ethnic differences. WB puts the formula center stage in the sitcom Like Family, which features two families - one white and one black - sharing the same small house. The premise has a middle-class African-American family of four opening their doors to a white single mom (Diane Farr)
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | January 28, 1991
HAROLD ROBBINS, the man who gave us "Never Love Stranger," "A Stone For Danny Fisher," "The Betsy," "The Adventurers," "Where Love Has Gone" and, of course, "The Carpetbaggers," celebrates his 30th anniversary with Simon & Schuster this year. To mark that best-selling milestone, Robbins' latest book, the long-awaited "The Piranhas," will be released this spring. It will be his first since 1985's "The Storyteller.""The Piranhas" is an action saga of governments in the grip of underworld organizations.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 15, 1992
TEXAS STATE representative Steve Wolens has filed a resolution for consideration by the legislature of the Lone Star State. If approved by Texas lawmakers, it would ask Congress immediately to make public all material pertaining to the assassination of John F. Kennedy -- all files used by the Warren Commission and the House Select Committee on Assassinations.If certain files can't be made public, the resolution would ask Congress to prepare a report explaining specifically why individual documents must be withheld.
FEATURES
By Patricia Rodriguez and Patricia Rodriguez,Contributing Writer | November 1, 1993
Poor Ted Danson and Whoopi Goldberg. They're the P.C. Poster Children of the moment.Make that ANTI-P.C. poster kids. With their recent stunt at New York's Friar's Club -- with Ted in blackface telling bawdy, race-based jokes written by Whoopi -- this year's fun couple not only landed in the headlines, they've been the subject of much finger-pointing by those who would claim to be arbiters of all that is politically correct.How unchic. How un-Hollywood.How trendy.Because it's finally happening.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | August 18, 2008
This is what I know. When you ask to go backstage to congratulate any or all of the cast members in the musical Xanadu, you are advised that they dress and undress together in a very small space and there's no room for anyone to "visit" with them. So last week, when some of the women of the Wowowow Web site wanted to greet their member, Whoopi Goldberg, after the show, we and our men folk had to stand near the stage, still in the audience, after the crowd filed out. In time, the cast of Xanadu trooped out to mix and mingle with us. There was the sexy all-American leading man, Cheyenne Jackson, who declared, "Well, tonight was sure boys' night out" in this theater.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | March 20, 1991
Director Richard Pearce's latest film is ''The Long Walk Home,'' a drama that takes place in 1955 in Montgomery, Ala., during the bus boycott that more or less opened the civil rights struggle.Pearce feels his film will find a national audience. ''I think people are looking for a way to heal,'' he said. ''This is a song that needs to be sung. It may not be cash in the bank, but it is an issue that should be addressed.''Baltimore,'' he said, ''will be the test.''You mean Baltimore represents the other America, the intellectual area that lies somewhere between the east and west coasts?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 24, 2010
A nyone who grew up in Maine, or near Pennsylvania's Amish country, or in parts of New England knows all about whoopie pies - the tooth-achingly sweet white icing sandwiched between two enormous, cakelike chocolate cookies. And boy, would those folks be surprised to know that their unassuming hometown treat has become a full-blown foodie phenomenon, desired by fashionable Manhattanites, noted in gourmet magazines and reinterpreted with sophisticated ingredients. Two books dedicated to the whoopie pie are due out in coming months, Williams-Sonoma is selling a $25 whoopie pan, and New York City's Magnolia Bakery, which launched the cupcake craze, now offers a brown sugar cookie whoopie filled with maple cream cheese icing.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2009
Misty Zimmerer of Baltimore was looking for a recipe for Amish Whoopie Pies, a chocolate-cake sandwich with a creamy white filling. There seem to be two basic versions of the traditional whoopie pie. One has a filling made with egg whites as the base, and the other uses marshmallow fluff as the base. I tested a recipe sent in by Alison Moore of Owings Mills that uses marshmallow fluff, Crisco and sugar for the filling. Moore grew up in Lancaster County, Pa., the heart of Amish country.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | August 18, 2008
This is what I know. When you ask to go backstage to congratulate any or all of the cast members in the musical Xanadu, you are advised that they dress and undress together in a very small space and there's no room for anyone to "visit" with them. So last week, when some of the women of the Wowowow Web site wanted to greet their member, Whoopi Goldberg, after the show, we and our men folk had to stand near the stage, still in the audience, after the crowd filed out. In time, the cast of Xanadu trooped out to mix and mingle with us. There was the sexy all-American leading man, Cheyenne Jackson, who declared, "Well, tonight was sure boys' night out" in this theater.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | August 11, 2008
HAPPINESS IS having a large, loving, caring, close-knit family in another city," said George Burns. Well, our friend Whoopi Goldberg has knocked the Broadway musical Xanadu up several big notches. It is finally getting the responsive audiences it deserves. Even Variety took notice last week of how the Whoop put the whoopee into this Tony-nominated, but sometimes neglected and enjoyable, romp. She'll be rolling around onstage at the Helen Hayes Theatre through Sept. 7. Cafe reopening I ran into the genial, good-hearted Drew Nieporent - restaurateur extraordinary - while sitting on a park bench waiting to enter Mayor Michael Bloomberg's party for Sen. Hillary Clinton.
FEATURES
By Matea Gold and Maria Elena Fernandez and Matea Gold and Maria Elena Fernandez,Los Angeles Times | August 2, 2007
NEW YORK -- It's Whoopi time! Barbara Walters announced yesterday that Whoopi Goldberg will replace Rosie O'Donnell as a moderator on The View when the daytime show's 11th season premieres Sept. 4. The addition of Goldberg to The View should guarantee the ABC daytime talk show a regular source of controversy and salty humor, ingredients that helped lift the program's ratings during O'Donnell's provocative tenure. Goldberg jogged down the aisle of the New York studio, slapping hands with the audience, when the announcement was made live on the air. "I love this show," said Goldberg, one of few performers to win an Oscar, Emmy, Tony and Grammy award.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 24, 2004
Stories about performers who risk controversy and reach for the edge on network television seldom end happily. "But, so far, so good," says Whoopi Goldberg of her experience as star and executive producer of Whoopi, a multi-ethnic and politically charged NBC sitcom that dares to tackle issues and attitudes that even cable TV avoids. The show, which airs tonight at 8, features Goldberg as Mavis Rae, a cranky, chain-smoking owner of a small Manhattan hotel who speaks her mind whether discussing President Bush, her Iranian concierge (Omid Djalili)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | August 22, 1991
On The Weekend Watch:PREMIERES, PREMIERES! -- It's still August, but the Fox network continues to jump into the new fall season ahead of everybody else. Tonight, for example (at 8:30, Channel 45) "True Colors" debuts for its second season, with an episode in which Lester (Adam Jeffries) tries to balance his life against the writings of Malcolm X. And on Sunday (at 7:30 p.m., Channel 45), Baltimore is the setting and inspiration for the new series "Roc," with Charles Dutton starring as a trash hauler trying to get a VCR for his wife's birthday.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2009
Misty Zimmerer of Baltimore was looking for a recipe for Amish Whoopie Pies, a chocolate-cake sandwich with a creamy white filling. There seem to be two basic versions of the traditional whoopie pie. One has a filling made with egg whites as the base, and the other uses marshmallow fluff as the base. I tested a recipe sent in by Alison Moore of Owings Mills that uses marshmallow fluff, Crisco and sugar for the filling. Moore grew up in Lancaster County, Pa., the heart of Amish country.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 9, 2003
The very first image viewers of the new NBC sitcom Whoopi will see tonight is that of Mavis Rae (Whoopi Goldberg) lighting a cigarette and taking a drag as she stands behind the front desk of the small Manhattan Hotel she owns. A guest standing nearby picks up a no-smoking sign and says, "Excuse me." "Oh, you're right, sir. I'm sorry. Here, I'll just put it out," she says meekly, moving her hand toward an ash tray. But as soon as the guest turns his back and starts to walk away, she puts the cigarette back in her mouth.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 4, 2003
The on-screen arrival of the Boomerang Generation is not the only trend of the new fall season. While not as widespread, another theme that will be explored in several series involves multi-ethnic households - with an emphasis on the humor of ethnic differences. WB puts the formula center stage in the sitcom Like Family, which features two families - one white and one black - sharing the same small house. The premise has a middle-class African-American family of four opening their doors to a white single mom (Diane Farr)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.