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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 12, 2002
WASHINGTON - Sales at U.S. wholesalers posted the largest gain in 19 months in January and inventories fell, a sign that further demand may have to be met by increased factory production. The 1.2 percent increase in sales after a 0.5 percent drop in December was the first since August and the biggest since June 2000, the Commerce Department reported yesterday. Stockpiles fell for an eighth consecutive month in January. The 0.2 percent decline after a drop of 0.5 percent in December brought the value of inventories to a two-year low of $287.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | June 9, 2014
A new BJ's Wholesale Club could open in Southeast Baltimore by the end of next year, said a development firm that has been working to make the area a shopping destination. Officials at Chesapeake Real Estate Group, who are partners in the Canton Crossing shops, said the company has an agreement with BJ's to locate on a 6.58-acre site on O'Donnell Street, formerly occupied by the New Jersey-based specialty paint company Complimentary Coatings Corp., which last year announced plans to close.
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2001
Two of Maryland's largest wholesale alcohol distributors are pressing ahead with plans for a partnership after the state attorney general's office decided not to challenge the plan on antitrust grounds. Churchill Distributors LLC of Baltimore and Reliable Liquors Inc. of Glen Burnie will form Reliable Churchill LLLP. The new venture will be an affiliate of the Charmer-Sunbelt Group, owner of Churchill and one of the largest beverage distributors in the country. James Smith, president of Reliable, will become the chairman and chief executive of the company.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
Anna B. George, a church secretary who enjoyed celebrating her German heritage, died Friday of melanoma at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 79. The daughter of George Braml, an Esskay meat cutter, and Anna Eder Braml, a homemaker, Anna Braml was born in Baltimore and raised in the city's Parkside neighborhood. She attended the Shrine of the Little Flower and graduated in 1952 from Catholic High School. "She had perfect attendance for four years. She was very, very proud of that," said her daughter, Terri Prokopik of Towson.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau | March 13, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A controversial bill to give Maryland wholesalers some economic protection against the manufacturers who supply them made it out of a House committee yesterday.But the heated debate preceding the 13-9 vote by the House Economic Matters Committee suggests that the heavily amended bill faces a fight in the full House next week.Sponsored at the behest of the Department of Economic and Employment Development, the bill sets rules for manufacturers who want to end their relationships early with some wholesale distributors.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau | March 13, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A controversial bill to give Maryland wholesalers some economic protection against the manufacturers who supply them made it out of a House committee yesterday.But the heated debate preceding the 13-9 vote by the House Economic Matters Committee suggests that the heavily amended bill faces a fight in the full House next week.Sponsored at the behest of the Department of Economic and Employment Development, the bill sets requirements for manufacturers who want to end their relationships early with some wholesale distributors.
NEWS
By Thomas Firey | March 13, 2008
The road to hell is paved with good intentions, says the old saw. It may soon be lined with higher-priced gas stations, too, thanks to Maryland's General Assembly. State lawmakers are considering legislation to ban motor fuel "zone pricing," under which fuel wholesalers charge higher prices to some retail gas stations than to others. Understandably, retailers oppose the practice, and legislators worry that it's unfair. But if lawmakers vote to prohibit zone pricing, consumers will end up paying higher gas prices, because low-price stations will end up charging more.
BUSINESS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1999
Nine cigar and wholesale tobacco companies in Maryland sued Baltimore yesterday to block a new cigar tax from taking effect July 1.The suit challenges legislation passed by City Council in December that will impose a levy of 18 cents to 36 cents on each cigar sold by wholesale tobacco dealers in the city.The bill originally targeted tobacco shops and pipe and chewing tobacco. Those businesses were cut from the measure after owners complained that the tax would wipe them out.A provision in the city law repeals the cigar tax when a 30-cents-a-pack increase in the state's cigarette tax -- now 36 cents a pack -- kicks in next year.
NEWS
December 8, 1994
POLICE LOG* Whitehall: Thieves broke into Centronic Wholesalers Inc., in the 1600 block of Whitehall Road, Monday morning and stole electronic equipment valued at more than $300, police said.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 22, 1992
There is nothing wrong with the economy that bombing Baghdad is going to put right.Congress, against military advice, is spending $1.5 billion to develop a tilt-rotor aircraft that is designed to go up and forward but actually goes down.The Baltimore financial district is cosmopolitan: a little bit of Ireland, a touch of New York, a slice of Virginia and now a hunk of North Carolina.Perot was going to end the welfare state for boaters, peanut wholesalers, motorists and all retired people.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
Abraham "Al" Ackerman, who rose from selling eggs door to door to owning and operating a wholesale egg company, died Sept. 6 from complications of bladder cancer at his Pikesville home. He was 89. The son of Russian immigrants, Abraham Ackerman was born in Baltimore and raised on Hill Street. He was a graduate of Southern High School. During World War II, he served with an anti-aircraft unit and participated in the Normandy invasion. In the early 1950s, Mr. Ackerman started selling eggs door to door.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
Sol Kramer, who turned a Depression-era 15-cent balsa toy airplane business into a leading wholesale hobby empire, died of pneumonia April 24 at Hospice by the Sea in Pompano Beach, Fla. The former Pikesville resident was 96. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Lithuanian immigrants. His father, Morris, was a Saratoga Street tailor. His mother, Dora, was a homemaker. Mr. Kramer was a graduate of the old Robert E. Lee School and received his diploma from City College at age 14. "He and his brother, Lou, belonged to the Junior Birdmen of America, a model airplane club promoted by the Hearst newspapers," said his son, Dr. Karl Kramer of Coral Gables, Fla. "His brother was really the airplane builder.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2013
Old Dominion Electric Cooperative said Tuesday that it will seek approval from Maryland regulators to build an electric power plant in Cecil County. The Virginia-based Old Dominion supplies power to about 550,000 households and businesses through 11 cooperatives in Maryland, Virginia and Delaware, including the 52,000-member Choptank Electric Cooperative on the Eastern Shore. The nonprofit said its proposed plant would be constructed near Rising Sun, at its Rock Springs facility.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Aaron Wilson, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
After spending the bye week meeting with coaches and reviewing every aspect of the Ravens' play through the first seven games, coach John Harbaugh said there are no plans to make "wholesale changes" before Sunday's game against the Cleveland Browns, and acknowledged that there isn't a simple fix to the team's road woes. "Execution is part of it, but coaching is part of it, game-planning is part of it, guys developing into their positions, whatever it might be, it's all a big part of it," Harbaugh said Monday.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | August 21, 2012
One of the latest tech startups to get a footing in Baltimore is Foodem , a website started by a University of Maryland College Park grad a few years ago that aims to build a transparent marketplace for commercial food buyers and distributors. Kash Rehman, the founder of Foodem, has been on both sides of the equation in the food industry: he's worked for a small food distributor in Maryland and he's also run his own restaurant in College Park. Here's what Rehman, 35, learned along the way. As a restaurant buyer, he needed to spend an hour by phone comparing wholesale prices for food (think chicken tenders)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2012
Albert Wilbur Woodfield Jr., former owner of a Rock Hall wholesale seafood company, died Wednesday at his daughter's Centreville home of complications from Alzheimer's disease. He was 81. The son of a wholesale seafood merchant and a homemaker, Mr. Woodfield was born and raised in Galesville and was a 1948 graduate of Southern High School in Lothian. Mr. Woodfield was a partner in Woodfield Fish & Oyster Co. of Galesville, which had been established by his father. In 1965, he left the business when he purchased Hubbard's Pier and Seafood Inc. in Rock Hall, which he owned and operated until selling the business in 1988.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Staff Writer | June 20, 1993
Before most of us have even thought about morning coffee, Norman "Moe" Mozal has rounded up 20,000 pounds of free fresh fruits and vegetables at the Maryland Wholesale Produce Market in Jessup.Mr. Mozal had the haul, valued at about $4,200 on the wholesale market, loaded and whisked off in a tractor trailer to Baltimore.By day's end all of the produce, from cherry tomatoes to iceberg lettuce and string beans, will be given away.No one will have paid a dime for the goods.The immediate beneficiary of the haul is the Baltimore-based Maryland Food Bank, the nonprofit organization that distributes donated food statewide to more than 400 organizations that help the needy.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN WINE CRITIC | August 6, 2003
SAN FRANCISCO - The same folks who decided Bush vs. Gore soon may be deciding whether wine can be delivered to your door. With lower federal courts divided, proponents and foes of interstate wine shipping are expecting the Supreme Court to eventually decide the issue. At stake will be the competing values of state's rights and free trade. That was the message last month when an advocate for the wine industry and consumers debated a lawyer for the nation's liquor wholesalers at the annual gathering here of the National Conference of State Legislatures.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2012
The $245 million settlement that Baltimore's Constellation Energy Group agreed to pay is the largest of its kind to resolve allegations of market manipulation with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Details of the settlement emerged Monday, the same day Chicago-based Exelon Corp. closed on its $7.9 billion takeover of Constellation. The sale creating the largest non-utility energy provider in the United States ushers Baltimore's last Fortune 500 company out of town. The New York Stock Exchange will de-list Constellation shares Tuesday.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2011
Hundreds of workers at Giant Food distribution center in Jessup worry that their jobs are in danger because a New Hampshire company will take over operations of the facility next month. The company, C&S Wholesale Grocers, laid off 1,100 workers at a subsidiary in New Jersey earlier this month when it shut down six food distribution centers. Unionized Giant workers fear they could face the same fate just as their contract is slated to expire May 14. About 600 of the workers and union organizers gathered at a Teamsters union hall Sunday to discuss how to fend off possible job losses that could impact more than 1,000 workers.
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