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Whittlesey

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By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Staff Writer | April 20, 1993
DENTON -- Michael Whittlesey, who robbed and killed a classmate in 1982 and buried the body Gunpowder Falls State Park, was sentenced by a Caroline County jury last night to die in Maryland's gas chamber.Whittlesey was convicted of robbing 17-year-old Jamie Griffin in 1984, but the murder prosecution was delayed for years while authorities and Jamie's parents searched the park for the remains that were finally found in 1990.The trial, moved to the Denton courthouse from Baltimore County at Whittlesey's request, ended with his conviction on capital murder charges March 29."
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
Virginia Whittlesey, a retired teacher and community volunteer, died of congestive heart failure March 29 at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The former Roland Park resident was 90. Born Virginia Markell King and raised in Bolton Hill, she was a 1940 graduate of the Bryn Mawr School and earned a degree in early-childhood education from Vassar College. She made her debut at the Bachelors Cotillon. During World War II she worked at a day care center for children of defense workers.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2003
Dr. Philip Whittlesey, an internist who practiced medicine in Baltimore for 55 years, died Thursday at Union Memorial Hospital of complications from bone marrow disease. The Roland Park resident was 84. Born and raised in the Boston suburb of Newton, he earned his undergraduate degree from Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine. He received a medical degree from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine during World War II. Dr. Whittlesey's medical training was largely paid for by the Army in return for wartime service.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2010
As a child, Lorraine Whittlesey was a member of TV's Peanut Gallery, helping make a star of an excitable, squeaky-voiced marionette named Howdy Doody. Next weekend, she'll be sitting in the audience at the Theatre Project , watching the world premiere of her musical based on a contentedly clueless comic-strip Pinhead named Zippy. The symmetry of such a creative continuum isn't lost on Whittlesey. She laughs heartily at the notion that there's a straight line connecting Howdy, the loose-limbed child's puppet that played sidekick to Buffalo Bob Smith for decades, to Zippy, an often befuddling, if not befuddled, observer of modern society whose non-sequiturs have become unwitting pop-culture catchphrases.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | April 13, 1993
DENTON -- Baltimore County prosecutors are asking a jury to sentence convicted killer Michael Whittlesey to death because he murdered his friend Jamie Griffin during a premeditated robbery 11 years ago in a secluded part of Gunpowder Falls State Park.But defense lawyers, who claim Whittlesey grew up in a troubled family where physical abuse and alcoholism were commonplace, pleaded with jurors yesterday that the 29-year-old defendant be spared the death penalty and instead be sentenced to life in prison.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2004
Convicted murderer Michael Whittlesey, who spent more than two years on death row for the 1982 killing of a Baltimore County teenager before the sentence was voided in favor of a life prison term, was back in court yesterday to ask that his punishment be further reduced. His attorney argued during a hearing in Baltimore County Circuit Court that a judge erred in 1984 in sentencing Whittlesey to consecutive prison terms of 10 years and 15 years for robbery and theft convictions stemming from the disappearance of 17-year-old Jamie Griffin.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | March 30, 1993
DENTON -- A Caroline County jury yesterday found Michael Whittlesey guilty on two counts of first-degree murder in the 1982 killing of his friend Jamie Griffin, a 17-year-old Baltimore County youth whose whereabouts was a mystery until his buried remains were discovered in 1990 in Gunpowder Falls State Park.The jury of seven men and five women deliberated just 2 1/2 hours -- less time than lawyers spent in their closing arguments.Whittlesey, now 29, stood quietly but frowned as the jury's forewoman announced that he had been found guilty of premeditated murder and felony murder.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | January 15, 1997
Convicted murderer Michael Whittlesey, who spent more than two years on death row before an appeals court voided his sentence, was sentenced yesterday to life in prison for the 1982 slaying of Jamie Griffin.In rejecting prosecutors' pleas that the death penalty be reinstated, Baltimore County Circuit Judge James T. Smith Jr. said Whittlesey's troubled family life helped make him an immature, impulsive 18-year-old when he killed the Cockeysville teen-ager and buried the body in Gunpowder Falls State Park.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | March 25, 1993
DENTON -- A forensic pathologist called by the defense in the murder trial of Michael Whittlesey testified yesterday that it was impossible to tell what caused the death of Jamie Griffin, whose body wasn't discovered until 1990 -- eight years after he disappeared."
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | April 17, 1993
DENTON -- Convicted killer Michael Whittlesey broke 11 years of silence yesterday with a lengthy public appeal for mercy from jurors who will decide whether he'll be executed or sentenced to life in prison for the 1982 slaying of his friend Jamie Griffin."
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 15, 2007
How many musically precocious toddlers have ever gotten a baby grand piano for a present on their third birthday? And of those lucky few, how many can say that more than half a century later they're still picking out melodies on the same instrument they received as a child? The mahogany-colored Knabe grand piano that sits in Baltimore composer Lorraine L. Whittlesey's light-filled studio in Canton has given her a lifetime of musical pleasure as well as sturdy, dependable service. It's the same instrument she learned to play as a child, and it was also the instrument on which she composed her most recent musical work, a soon-to-be-published multimedia choral composition based on physicist Alan Lightman's best-selling 1993 novel, Einstein's Dream.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Taya Flores and Taya Flores,sun reporter | October 26, 2006
Music runs through her veins. At 59, composer Lorraine L. Whittlesey never dreamed of pursuing any other career because music was always her thing. "My father took me to a performance of conductor Arturo Toscanini when I was 3," she says. "He told me that if I made a sound, I had to leave. I didn't make a noise because I was so entertained." For her latest composition, Einstein's Dreams (It's about time...), which debuts today at Theater Project in conjunction with Westminster's Chamber Music on the Hill, she took a novel that inspired her and made it hers -- by making it musical.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 31, 2004
A judge denied yesterday a request from a man convicted in the 1982 killing of a Baltimore County teenager that his punishment be reduced, seven years after the inmate's death sentence in the crime was voided in favor of a life term. Baltimore County Circuit Judge Vicki Ballou-Watts issued a written order denying the request from Michael Whittlesey, whose attorney argued during a hearing this month that a judge erred in 1984 in sentencing Whittlesey to consecutive prison terms of 10 years and 15 years for robbery and theft convictions stemming from the disappearance of 17-year-old Jamie Griffin.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2004
Convicted murderer Michael Whittlesey, who spent more than two years on death row for the 1982 killing of a Baltimore County teenager before the sentence was voided in favor of a life prison term, was back in court yesterday to ask that his punishment be further reduced. His attorney argued during a hearing in Baltimore County Circuit Court that a judge erred in 1984 in sentencing Whittlesey to consecutive prison terms of 10 years and 15 years for robbery and theft convictions stemming from the disappearance of 17-year-old Jamie Griffin.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2003
Dr. Philip Whittlesey, an internist who practiced medicine in Baltimore for 55 years, died Thursday at Union Memorial Hospital of complications from bone marrow disease. The Roland Park resident was 84. Born and raised in the Boston suburb of Newton, he earned his undergraduate degree from Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine. He received a medical degree from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine during World War II. Dr. Whittlesey's medical training was largely paid for by the Army in return for wartime service.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 19, 2002
Joyce Scott and Lorraine Whittlesey could hardly be more different on the outside - one large, one skinny, one black, one white, one from B'more, one from Oyster Bay and Manhattan. Yet when they're together on stage, something clicks. Sparks fly. Eyebrows rise. Smiles of recognition materialize. Teeth occasionally gnash. Scott and Whittlesey are visual artist and musician, respectively, each of whom has a highly successful independent career. Whittlesey's the slinky, blond, piano- and synthesizer-playing composer.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1997
Baltimore County prosecutors sought yesterday to restore a death sentence for the man convicted in the 1982 murder of Jamie Griffin, the Cockeysville teen-ager whose body lay undetected in a Gunpowder Falls State Park grave for eight years.But lawyers for Michael Whittlesey, whose death sentence was overturned in 1995 by the Maryland Court of Appeals, said his life should be spared, in large part because he was subjected to severe abuse while growing up.Saying that Whittlesey, now 33, was a "troubled, severely damaged child" of 18 at the time of the slaying, defense lawyer Donald E. Zaremba added, "He had no resources to deal with the insanity in his family."
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 15, 2007
How many musically precocious toddlers have ever gotten a baby grand piano for a present on their third birthday? And of those lucky few, how many can say that more than half a century later they're still picking out melodies on the same instrument they received as a child? The mahogany-colored Knabe grand piano that sits in Baltimore composer Lorraine L. Whittlesey's light-filled studio in Canton has given her a lifetime of musical pleasure as well as sturdy, dependable service. It's the same instrument she learned to play as a child, and it was also the instrument on which she composed her most recent musical work, a soon-to-be-published multimedia choral composition based on physicist Alan Lightman's best-selling 1993 novel, Einstein's Dream.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson | February 23, 1997
The composer and the computer; Music: Lorraine Whittlesey 0) writes for new instruments, ancient ones and everything in between.With a flick of the wrist, Lorraine L. Whittlesey sends a blank music score sheet sliding across the floor of her Roland Park home."
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1997
The Griffins keep Jamie's room much as it was April 2, 1982, when their teen-age boy left his Cockeysville home, never to return alive. Baseball legends and rock stars gaze down from the wall. Brooks Robinson and Eddie Murray, the Clash and the Who.In the room are the bunk beds where Jamie slept.The bunk where his killer slept."You-know-who slept there when he spent the night," Lou Ellen Griffin says. She's pointing to the bottom bunk, and she's talking about Michael Whittlesey.Whittlesey spent two years on death row for Jamie's murder, but an appeals court voided that sentence in 1995.
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