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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 16, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Senate Whitewater Committee, completing its 13-month investigation, has concluded that Hillary Rodham Clinton directed aides to prevent investigators from examining politically sensitive documents in the White House office of deputy counsel Vincent W. Foster Jr. after he killed himself three years ago.In a report scheduled to be made public Tuesday after it is filed with the full Senate, the Republicans who control the committee said that...
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NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 19, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes likes to think of himself as quietly effective, a politician uninterested in publicity and willing to work behind the scenes.So it was somewhat unusual yesterday to watch Maryland's low-profile senior senator as he held forth before several dozen reporters and cameras defending the honor of President Clinton and repudiating Republicans for the "venom" with which they have gone after Hillary Rodham Clinton.Glad to be finishedAs the senior Democrat on the Senate Whitewater Committee, Sarbanes was delivering his party's report on more than a year's worth of hearings and putting the finishing touches on one of the more public roles of his 25-year Washington career.
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NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 19, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes likes to think of himself as quietly effective, a politician uninterested in publicity and willing to work behind the scenes.So it was somewhat unusual yesterday to watch Maryland's low-profile senior senator as he held forth before several dozen reporters and cameras defending the honor of President Clinton and repudiating Republicans for the "venom" with which they have gone after Hillary Rodham Clinton.Glad to be finishedAs the senior Democrat on the Senate Whitewater Committee, Sarbanes was delivering his party's report on more than a year's worth of hearings and putting the finishing touches on one of the more public roles of his 25-year Washington career.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- On the eve of today's release of the Senate Whitewater committee report, which is sharply critical of Hillary Rodham Clinton, the first lady yesterday offered a terse and perfunctory response to questions posed to her by her Republican accusers last week.The two-page affidavit was preceded by a caustic letter, tinged with sarcasm, in which the first lady's lawyer, David E. Kendall, called the Republicans' inquiry of the first lady a "last-minute hit-and-run smear" and said the senators were not seriously interested in her responses.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 15, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Unwilling to avert a constitutional showdown, a Senate committee rejected a conditional offer by the White House yesterday to provide notes of a Whitewater meeting.On a straight party-line vote of 10-8, the Senate Whitewater Committee decided to enforce its subpoena, which demands that notes made by a former White House lawyer be handed over by 9 a.m. today, without any conditions.If it isn't resolved, the committee will ask the full Senate to challenge the administration in federal court.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 13, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Invoking executive privilege for the first time on Whitewater, the White House yesterday defended President Clinton's decision to defy Senate subpoenas with a brief that relied in part on legal arguments put forward during Watergate by President Richard M. Nixon and during the Iran-Contra scandal by former members of the Reagan administration.The brief, filed last night with the Senate Whitewater committee, repeated the White House argument that Mr. Clinton could withhold material from the committee about a 1993 Whitewater meeting involving senior aides and lawyers because it was protected by the lawyer-client privilege.
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | April 19, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The decision by a voice vote in the Senate to revive till June the stalled (by Democrats) special committee investigation will ensure that the public receives the next installment in events known collectively as Whitewater.Even the Washington Post -- no friend of committee chairman Alfonse D'Amato of New York -- had criticized Democrats for filibustering to keep the Whitewater Special Committee from completing its task. Said a Post editorial, ''Senate Whitewater committee Democrats have behaved less as seekers of truth than as bail bondsmen at every turn for embattled Clinton officials and associates.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- On the eve of today's release of the Senate Whitewater committee report, which is sharply critical of Hillary Rodham Clinton, the first lady yesterday offered a terse and perfunctory response to questions posed to her by her Republican accusers last week.The two-page affidavit was preceded by a caustic letter, tinged with sarcasm, in which the first lady's lawyer, David E. Kendall, called the Republicans' inquiry of the first lady a "last-minute hit-and-run smear" and said the senators were not seriously interested in her responses.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 30, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Trying to show that the federal official who started the Whitewater investigation was biased, Senate Democrats yesterday revealed a personal letter by the investigator in which she disparaged then-presidential candidate Bill Clinton using provocative language.But that official, Jean Lewis -- a former criminal investigator for the Resolution Trust Corp. -- told the Senate Whitewater Committee yesterday that she had bent over backward to keep her "political bias" out of her work.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 25, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Democrats, like Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes of Maryland, concede that, "even if there's no fire," the Republicans' steady beating of the Whitewater drum this year has created a lot of smoke.Increasingly, that smoke is wafting around Hillary Rodham Clinton. She was at the heart of the latest round of hearings that the Senate Whitewater Committee ended last week. And, with her former law firm, she is mentioned often in the notes of a former White House lawyer that were released by the White House last week after a showdown with Congress.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 16, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Senate Whitewater Committee, completing its 13-month investigation, has concluded that Hillary Rodham Clinton directed aides to prevent investigators from examining politically sensitive documents in the White House office of deputy counsel Vincent W. Foster Jr. after he killed himself three years ago.In a report scheduled to be made public Tuesday after it is filed with the full Senate, the Republicans who control the committee said that...
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | April 19, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The decision by a voice vote in the Senate to revive till June the stalled (by Democrats) special committee investigation will ensure that the public receives the next installment in events known collectively as Whitewater.Even the Washington Post -- no friend of committee chairman Alfonse D'Amato of New York -- had criticized Democrats for filibustering to keep the Whitewater Special Committee from completing its task. Said a Post editorial, ''Senate Whitewater committee Democrats have behaved less as seekers of truth than as bail bondsmen at every turn for embattled Clinton officials and associates.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | January 15, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In a move sure to fuel accusations of partisanship, congressional Republicans will announce this week that they intend to extend the Senate Whitewater Committee beyond its Feb. 29 expiration date, pushing the politically charged probe well into the presidential election year.Sources close to the committee headed by Sen. Alfonse D'Amato, the New York Republican who co-chairs the presidential campaign of Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole, say the panel's interim report, slated for release tomorrow, will conclude that more time is needed to explore new information about first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 25, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Democrats, like Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes of Maryland, concede that, "even if there's no fire," the Republicans' steady beating of the Whitewater drum this year has created a lot of smoke.Increasingly, that smoke is wafting around Hillary Rodham Clinton. She was at the heart of the latest round of hearings that the Senate Whitewater Committee ended last week. And, with her former law firm, she is mentioned often in the notes of a former White House lawyer that were released by the White House last week after a showdown with Congress.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Senate Whitewater panel said yesterday that documents describing Hillary Rodham Clinton's work for a failing savings and loan vanished from her former law firm in Little Rock, Ark., before President Clinton took office.Republicans on the committee said the missing papers were crucial to understanding the role Mrs. Clinton played during the 1980s, when her firm represented the failing savings and loan association, Madison Guaranty, in meetings with state regulators appointed by her husband, then the governor of Arkansas.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 15, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Unwilling to avert a constitutional showdown, a Senate committee rejected a conditional offer by the White House yesterday to provide notes of a Whitewater meeting.On a straight party-line vote of 10-8, the Senate Whitewater Committee decided to enforce its subpoena, which demands that notes made by a former White House lawyer be handed over by 9 a.m. today, without any conditions.If it isn't resolved, the committee will ask the full Senate to challenge the administration in federal court.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Senate Whitewater panel said yesterday that documents describing Hillary Rodham Clinton's work for a failing savings and loan vanished from her former law firm in Little Rock, Ark., before President Clinton took office.Republicans on the committee said the missing papers were crucial to understanding the role Mrs. Clinton played during the 1980s, when her firm represented the failing savings and loan association, Madison Guaranty, in meetings with state regulators appointed by her husband, then the governor of Arkansas.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 14, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In the law, there are two Bill Clintons, separate in many ways: the president and the person. But the two have come together to assert a right to resist a Senate committee subpoena -- an apparently unprecedented claim that could wind up in court.The White House and the president's private lawyers told the Senate Whitewater committee Tuesday they would not hand over notes of a November 1993 meeting, attended by seven Clinton attorneys.This morning, the committee is expected to vote on whether to demand obedience to the subpoena -- a vote that could move the dispute a step closer to a major constitutional fight in court.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 14, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In the law, there are two Bill Clintons, separate in many ways: the president and the person. But the two have come together to assert a right to resist a Senate committee subpoena -- an apparently unprecedented claim that could wind up in court.The White House and the president's private lawyers told the Senate Whitewater committee Tuesday they would not hand over notes of a November 1993 meeting, attended by seven Clinton attorneys.This morning, the committee is expected to vote on whether to demand obedience to the subpoena -- a vote that could move the dispute a step closer to a major constitutional fight in court.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 13, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Invoking executive privilege for the first time on Whitewater, the White House yesterday defended President Clinton's decision to defy Senate subpoenas with a brief that relied in part on legal arguments put forward during Watergate by President Richard M. Nixon and during the Iran-Contra scandal by former members of the Reagan administration.The brief, filed last night with the Senate Whitewater committee, repeated the White House argument that Mr. Clinton could withhold material from the committee about a 1993 Whitewater meeting involving senior aides and lawyers because it was protected by the lawyer-client privilege.
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