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NEWS
December 4, 2011
Let the first word be one of compassion. For anyone who has a loved one missing, Godspeed the day of that person's safe return. Or failing that, Godspeed the bitter satisfaction of knowing his or her fate. To have someone you love vanish is, one imagines, a special kind of hell. That said, let the second word be one of exasperation. Another white woman has turned up missing. And, as predictably happens in such cases, television news has gone into overdrive, CNN, ABC, NBC providing breathless updates of Michelle Parker's disappearance, how she was last seen the day she appeared on "The People's Court," suing her former fiance, who is now the prime suspect in her alleged kidnapping.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
A White Marsh woman will spend the rest of her life in prison for hiring a hit man to kill her husband — a man she has insisted subjected her to years of abuse. A judge handed down the sentence Monday after jurors rejected Karla Porter's claim of self-defense and convicted her in August of first-degree murder. Prosecutors have disputed the allegations of abuse by William "Ray" Porter, arguing that she concocted them to justify a cold-blooded murder. "The evidence at the trial was very clear.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 3, 1993
BAY MINETTE, Ala. -- Walter McMillian walked out of a courtroom here yesterday a free man after prosecutors conceded that he had spent six years awaiting execution on Alabama's Death Row because of perjured testimony and evidence withheld from his lawyers.Whether he was also put there for being a black man who violated the racial and sexual taboos of the small-town South is only one of the issues swirling around the case, which has also raised larger questions of race and justice.Almost everything about Mr. McMillian's conviction in 1987 for the shooting death of an 18-year-old white female store clerk now seems extraordinary.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2013
Jurors are expected to begin deliberating Monday whether Karla Porter is guilty of premeditated murder for hiring a man to kill her husband, or of a lesser charge because she was acting in self-defense. Porter, 51, is charged with first-degree murder in the death of her husband of 24 years, William "Ray" Porter. He was shot to death March 1, 2010, at the Towson gas station he owned after prosecutors said his wife offered to pay an Essex man $9,000. The hit man, William Bishop, was previously convicted in the murder and is serving a life sentence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2010
'Not in My Neighborhood: How Bigotry Shaped a Great American City,' by Antero Pietila (Ivan R. Dee, 320 pages, $28.95) Builder James W. Rouse is remembered as a visionary because of his shopping malls and new towns, like Columbia - promoted as free of racial discrimination. But Rouse had another, less egalitarian side, according to Antero Pietila, a former Baltimore Sun reporter and editorial writer. That side had shown itself a few years earlier in 1951 when, as vice president of the Northwood Co., Rouse looked the other way as blacks and Jews were excluded from the Northwood community.
NEWS
By Ethel Morgan Smith | February 26, 1997
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. -- I'm glad February is almost over. It's during this month that everyone is looking for me -- or anyone who can come and be black for them.I'm the only African-American professor in my university department of 50 faculty members. I reside in a world that is predominantly white and male: a land-grant state university with about 20,000 students, 5 percent of whom are African-Americans.During February, my mailbox is overflowing. Most of the mail wants me to represent ''my people'' for some worthwhile organization during the month of February and February only.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 1, 2002
YORK, Pa. - Jurors weighing murder charges against former Mayor Charlie Robertson and two other defendants accused in the murder of a black woman during a week of racial violence in 1969 will begin hearing the case today. Prosecutors and defense attorneys are expected to summarize their evidence in opening statements this morning after the judge swears in and gives preliminary instructions to the jury of six white men and six white women. The lawyers finished selecting the last of six alternate jurors yesterday, adding a white man who coaches youth athletics and a white woman who has worked for the Pennsylvania State Police.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 9, 2002
LONDON - A white couple has become the parents of black twins after a mistake by a fertility clinic during in-vitro fertilization in what appears to be the first case of its kind in Britain. The mix-up was reported yesterday by the British newspaper The Sun. In response, the High Court issued an injunction forbidding the publication or broadcasting of details of the case. The case also involves a black couple that sought treatment at the same clinic but did not have children afterward.
NEWS
February 13, 2003
Anne Burr McDermott, 84, who acted under the name Anne Burr on Broadway and radio in the 1940s and helped initiate live television shows including the series City Hospital in the early 1950s, died of respiratory failure Feb. 1 in Old Lyme, Conn. Born in Boston, she began her acting career in summer theater and made her Broadway debut in the 1941 play Native Son. The play was adapted by Paul Green and Richard Wright from Mr. Wright's novel of the same title about the accidental killing of a white woman by a black man. Even though the two main characters were not a romantic couple, the play raised eyebrows in its day for casting a white woman opposite a black man (Canada Lee)
SPORTS
By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 13, 2003
AUGUSTA, Ga. - A protest almost nine months in the making took little more than an hour to play out yesterday. Martha Burk and her National Council of Women's Organizations spent more time inflating and deflating a giant pink pig - "Augusta National Corporate Pigs' Club" was the porker's message - than it took for four speakers to earn scattered applause for a series of speeches against Augusta National Golf Course and its all-male membership. As tournament play continued half a mile up Washington Road, fewer than 50 protesters scrambled out of buses to support Burk in her campaign to force Augusta National to accept its first female member.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2013
Accused of ordering a man to kill her husband at a Towson gas station, Karla Porter claims that she felt she had no other choice as she sought to escape an abusive relationship in which she believed her life was in danger. "Ray Porter had become verbally abusive, controlling … physically abusive," Porter's attorney, Teresa Whalen, said in opening statements Tuesday. She said Porter's husband once ground her face into her mother's headstone, telling her she should be dead, too. But prosecutors urged jurors not to lose sight of the fact that the White Marsh woman arranged the hit on her husband and tried to mislead authorities, starting with the 911 call in which she claimed that an unknown man had shot her husband and fled the scene.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2012
Jurors watched a 35-minute police surveillance video, a key piece of evidence, as state prosecutors began Thursday to lay out their case against brothers Tremayne and Travers Johnson, accused of setting a pit bull ablaze. Deputy State's Attorney Jennifer Rallo likened the state's case to the pieces of a puzzle, telling jurors they would hear statements from police officers and a friend of the defendants that would corroborate what can be seen in the video. But defense lawyer Andrew Northrup, representing Tremayne Johnson, emphasized that absent from the video is any picture of a crime being committed.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2012
When an African-American was accused of raping a white woman and another of murdering a white locomotive engineer, Springfield, Ill., exploded into a race riot on the evening of Aug. 14, 1908. The mob grew furious when they learned that the two men had been spirited away to Bloomington, Ill., by the sheriff. Sensing trouble, Gov. Charles S. Deneen sent the National Guard to the city to restore order, but the rioters were not to be stopped. After destroying a small black business district, the mob turned its fury on Badlands, a black neighborhood, where they burned some 40 homes while a crowd of 5,000 spectators looked on. An African-American barber who had tried to defend his shop was lynched.
NEWS
December 4, 2011
Let the first word be one of compassion. For anyone who has a loved one missing, Godspeed the day of that person's safe return. Or failing that, Godspeed the bitter satisfaction of knowing his or her fate. To have someone you love vanish is, one imagines, a special kind of hell. That said, let the second word be one of exasperation. Another white woman has turned up missing. And, as predictably happens in such cases, television news has gone into overdrive, CNN, ABC, NBC providing breathless updates of Michelle Parker's disappearance, how she was last seen the day she appeared on "The People's Court," suing her former fiance, who is now the prime suspect in her alleged kidnapping.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2010
'Not in My Neighborhood: How Bigotry Shaped a Great American City,' by Antero Pietila (Ivan R. Dee, 320 pages, $28.95) Builder James W. Rouse is remembered as a visionary because of his shopping malls and new towns, like Columbia - promoted as free of racial discrimination. But Rouse had another, less egalitarian side, according to Antero Pietila, a former Baltimore Sun reporter and editorial writer. That side had shown itself a few years earlier in 1951 when, as vice president of the Northwood Co., Rouse looked the other way as blacks and Jews were excluded from the Northwood community.
NEWS
By Kenneth Lavon Johnson | August 2, 2007
Last month, about one hour after my arrival in Atlanta to visit a family member, I was confronted, once again, with the burden that all black men in this country face on a daily basis. I was standing in front of my relative's home in an upscale neighborhood, surveying the beauty that surrounded me, when a white woman in her early 30s approached me, with her dog, from across the street. She asked me, in a rather hostile voice, "Are you waiting for someone?" I responded by saying, "Good afternoon.
NEWS
By Kenneth Lavon Johnson | August 2, 2007
Last month, about one hour after my arrival in Atlanta to visit a family member, I was confronted, once again, with the burden that all black men in this country face on a daily basis. I was standing in front of my relative's home in an upscale neighborhood, surveying the beauty that surrounded me, when a white woman in her early 30s approached me, with her dog, from across the street. She asked me, in a rather hostile voice, "Are you waiting for someone?" I responded by saying, "Good afternoon.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2012
Jurors watched a 35-minute police surveillance video, a key piece of evidence, as state prosecutors began Thursday to lay out their case against brothers Tremayne and Travers Johnson, accused of setting a pit bull ablaze. Deputy State's Attorney Jennifer Rallo likened the state's case to the pieces of a puzzle, telling jurors they would hear statements from police officers and a friend of the defendants that would corroborate what can be seen in the video. But defense lawyer Andrew Northrup, representing Tremayne Johnson, emphasized that absent from the video is any picture of a crime being committed.
NEWS
By Anica Butler and Anica Butler,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2005
An early-morning blaze yesterday in a quiet White Marsh neighborhood killed a single mother and her two children. Neighbors in the tight-knit community say the boys, ages 8 and 10, were "exceptional" -- well-behaved, friendly kids who and loved to play basketball with the other neighborhood children. Tami Maguire, 36, and her sons, Michael H. Maguire, 10, and Eric S. Maguire, 8, were found dead by firefighters on the second floor of the two-story home, according to fire officials. The investigation into the cause of the blaze, which heavily damaged the rowhouse in the first block of Trailwood Road, is continuing, but officials said the cause does not appear to be criminal.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | January 17, 2005
WASHINGTON - Jack Johnson was a black man who often spent his days beating up white men and his nights making love to white women. This, in the first years of the last century. So you can understand why he was a polarizing figure, why newspapers inveighed against him and the government conspired to bring him down. Of course, chances are good that you've never even heard of Mr. Johnson. As filmmaker Ken Burns pointed out to me in a telephone interview, we are a nation of great historical illiteracy.
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