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By Paul West and Paul West,New York Times News ServiceSun Staff Correspondent | November 18, 1991
NEW ORLEANS -- For the first day in a month, Louisianans could breathe easily yesterday. David Duke would not be their next governor after all.But behind the lopsided returns in Saturday's election lay a sobering fact: A majority of the state's white voters -- about 55 percent -- had cast their ballots for the former Klansman and neo-Nazi.Despite an unprecedented and wildly successful negative ad campaign aimed at stopping him, Mr. Duke got 75,000 more votes than he received in his U.S. Senate bid last year.
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NEWS
By PAUL WEST and PAUL WEST,WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF | August 10, 2008
WASHINGTON - If Barack Obama's mother were alive today, she'd be 65. In other words, she'd be part of his problem. Obama's problem is with older white voters. He's been wooing them for months and still has little to show for it. During the primaries, they swung solidly behind Hillary Clinton. Now they're backing John McCain. Among white voters 65 and older, McCain leads by 15 points, according to a recent Greenberg Quinlan Rosner survey for Democracy Corps. The Democratic firm found that McCain is running four points better among white seniors than President Bush did four years ago. "White seniors," then, may be the solution to a puzzle that's perplexed some people, namely, why are the national polls so close, given the built-in advantages for a Democratic candidate this year?
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NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,Sun Staff Writer | August 20, 1995
Just 3 1/2 weeks before the Democratic primary, there is no front-runner in the race for City Council president, while city comptroller candidate Joan Pratt has narrowed the gap with Julian Lapides, according to a poll conducted by Mason-Dixon Political/Media Research for The Sun and WMAR-TV Channel 2.In the survey of 435 likely Democratic primary voters, only seven percentage points separate the leader and the fourth-place candidate in the race for council...
NEWS
By Clarence Page | May 13, 2008
A day after her hoped-for monster triumph in the Indiana and North Carolina primaries fizzled, Sen. Hillary Clinton no longer seemed to care whom she offended. She dared to speak about race and gender in public with the candid language that even political consultants usually keep private. Despite losing big to Sen. Barack Obama in North Carolina's Democratic primary and barely squeaking out a victory in Indiana, she said in an interview with USA Today that "I have a much broader base to build a winning coalition on."
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,SUN REPORTER | August 13, 2007
It was a hot Sunday afternoon, and City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. was standing on a platform in front of a South Baltimore crowd, pounding away at the theme of diversity. "That's what this city is about," the mayoral candidate boomed into the microphone. "Our diversity. That's what this campaign is about. Diversity." For this predominantly black city - where race subtly imbues every aspect of politics - the message of inclusion clearly struck a chord with the sea of largely white faces in the audience.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | March 19, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Trying to quell a "firestorm" that threatens his presidential chances, Barack Obama delivered a sweeping address yesterday that bluntly challenged Americans to move beyond "the racial stalemate that we've been stuck in for years." He repeated his criticism of racially charged remarks by his former pastor that, he acknowledged, have raised "nagging questions" about his candidacy. But he also used the controversy as a springboard for wide-ranging remarks that touched on the nation's legacy of racial division and long-simmering animosities that, he said, have hindered social progress.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | November 14, 1992
For years the dirty little secret of the Democratic Party was that, with the exception of Lyndon Johnson in 1964, no Democratic presidential candidate since FDR has won a majority of the white popular vote.This year, of course, all that was supposed to change. Bill Clinton aimed his appeal to middle-class suburbanites and Reagan Democrats, two groups whose defection from the party in presidential contests have kept Democrats out of the White House for the past 12 years.When the first exit-poll data began coming in this week, it looked as though Mr. Clinton's strategy had indeed paid off. Early polls suggested that he had won a plurality of white voters by a margin of as much as 4 percentage points.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,Washington Bureau | November 5, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In winning as a self-styled "different kind of Democrat," President-elect Bill Clinton fashioned a different kind of coalition than those Democrats have relied upon so heavily in the past.Preliminary analyses of the exit polls and election returns showed the foundation of Mr. Clinton's support was made up of traditional party blocs.For example, the Arkansas governor won more than 90 percent of the black vote, almost two-thirds of the Hispanic-American vote, a majority of union workers and three-fourths of the Jewish vote.
NEWS
By Carol M. Swain | June 4, 1993
THE debate over Lani Guinier's fitness to serve as the Justice Department's civil rights chief rightly centers on her distrust of the democratic process and her failure to acknowledge African-Americans' significant progress under the Voting Rights Act.She favors artificial schemes for increasing the political power of minorities.I disagree. African-Americans, for example, cannot benefit from the continued emphasis on segregating black voters in black-majority districts.When the new House was sworn in last January, the number of black members rose to 38 from 25. They now constitute nearly 9 percent of the House as against 12 percent of blacks in the population.
NEWS
By PAUL WEST and PAUL WEST,WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF | August 10, 2008
WASHINGTON - If Barack Obama's mother were alive today, she'd be 65. In other words, she'd be part of his problem. Obama's problem is with older white voters. He's been wooing them for months and still has little to show for it. During the primaries, they swung solidly behind Hillary Clinton. Now they're backing John McCain. Among white voters 65 and older, McCain leads by 15 points, according to a recent Greenberg Quinlan Rosner survey for Democracy Corps. The Democratic firm found that McCain is running four points better among white seniors than President Bush did four years ago. "White seniors," then, may be the solution to a puzzle that's perplexed some people, namely, why are the national polls so close, given the built-in advantages for a Democratic candidate this year?
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun reporter | May 12, 2008
ROMNEY, West Va. -- Bill Arnold's life-sized likeness of Barack Obama gets no respect. Friends vandalized the cardboard cutout at a meeting in this small eastern panhandle city, plastering the face with a picture of Hillary Clinton. His mother, embarrassed to have the prop in her house, flipped it upside down so neighbors walking past her window wouldn't recognize it. "This is Hillary country," explained Arnold, a 58-year-old retired behavior disorder teacher, as he carried the figure into the Obama campaign headquarters here where it would be sheltered from further abuse.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | March 24, 2008
I look forward confidently to the day when all who work for a living will be one, with no thought to their separateness as Negroes, Jews, Italians or any other distinctions. - the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Dec. 11, 1961 Tom Watson, memorialized with a statue on the grounds of the Georgia State Capitol, is remembered for a virulent racism that denigrated Catholics, demonized Jews and lauded a Ku Klux Klan that would terrorize former slaves. But Mr. Watson didn't start his political career as a hatemonger.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | March 19, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Trying to quell a "firestorm" that threatens his presidential chances, Barack Obama delivered a sweeping address yesterday that bluntly challenged Americans to move beyond "the racial stalemate that we've been stuck in for years." He repeated his criticism of racially charged remarks by his former pastor that, he acknowledged, have raised "nagging questions" about his candidacy. But he also used the controversy as a springboard for wide-ranging remarks that touched on the nation's legacy of racial division and long-simmering animosities that, he said, have hindered social progress.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | February 13, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Barack Obama might keep calling himself the underdog. But from now on, that dog won't hunt. His smashing victories in three Mid-Atlantic primaries yesterday will likely be seen as a turning point in the 2008 presidential contest. Obama came roaring out of Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia with a new lode of delegates, taking the lead for the first time over Hillary Clinton, who once seemed all but unbeatable. The latest results confirmed that Obama has continued to broaden and deepen his coalition, and he is now cutting into the heart of Clinton's base of support.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,SUN REPORTER | August 13, 2007
It was a hot Sunday afternoon, and City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. was standing on a platform in front of a South Baltimore crowd, pounding away at the theme of diversity. "That's what this city is about," the mayoral candidate boomed into the microphone. "Our diversity. That's what this campaign is about. Diversity." For this predominantly black city - where race subtly imbues every aspect of politics - the message of inclusion clearly struck a chord with the sea of largely white faces in the audience.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | January 19, 2000
DES MOINES -- The conventional wisdom is that African-American and Latino voters will find it easy to support either Vice President Al Gore or former senator Bill Bradley against the Republican nominee in the general election campaign next fall. No one questions the proposition that both Democrats are fully committed to economic and social justice for minorities. That was obvious when they confronted one another here in what was called a brown-black presidential forum limited to discussion of questions of particular relevance to minorities.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | February 13, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Barack Obama might keep calling himself the underdog. But from now on, that dog won't hunt. His smashing victories in three Mid-Atlantic primaries yesterday will likely be seen as a turning point in the 2008 presidential contest. Obama came roaring out of Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia with a new lode of delegates, taking the lead for the first time over Hillary Clinton, who once seemed all but unbeatable. The latest results confirmed that Obama has continued to broaden and deepen his coalition, and he is now cutting into the heart of Clinton's base of support.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | January 19, 2000
DES MOINES -- The conventional wisdom is that African-American and Latino voters will find it easy to support either Vice President Al Gore or former senator Bill Bradley against the Republican nominee in the general election campaign next fall. No one questions the proposition that both Democrats are fully committed to economic and social justice for minorities. That was obvious when they confronted one another here in what was called a brown-black presidential forum limited to discussion of questions of particular relevance to minorities.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 2, 1995
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Defying fears of anarchy or apathy, South Africans celebrated another level of democracy yesterday as long lines of voters snaked away from the polling stations in local elections.At one station near the Kruger National Park, voters reportedly had to outmaneuver an elephant grazing on berries in a nearby tree. At several stations in the township of Soweto, voters faced the wrath of supporters of the Inkatha Freedom Party, who claimed one of their candidates was not properly listed on the ballot.
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | September 17, 1995
LaTanya Bailey Jones voted last Tuesday for change -- and for the incumbent, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke.She is not altogether pleased with his leadership, but she could not imagine voting for his opponent. The continuing promise of Mr. Schmoke's presence as a black elected official was enough for her."I'm part of the black middle class that doesn't want to give up the hope that black leadership of the '70s and '80s will have answers for the problems of the '90s. I decided that if Kurt Schmoke gets a message from this election, that may be all we need," she said.
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