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By Kay Chubbuck and Kay Chubbuck,Special to the Sun | May 7, 2000
"White Teeth," by Zadie Smith. Random House. 462 pages. $29.95. Not since Mary Shelley composed "Frankenstein" at the age of 19 has a bookish young woman made such an extraordinary debut. In this case, "White Teeth" was written during 24-year-old Zadie Smith's spare time at Cambridge University. But make no mistake: it's no Brideshead Regurgitated. Instead, this novel has zest. It bubbles and pops in its imaginative intensity. Smith's intent: a comic portrayal of what it means to be "ethnic."
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NEWS
November 17, 2013
Susan Reimer 's recent column regarding Sarah Palin was spot on and laugh-out-loud hilarious ( "Sarah Palin: the gift that keeps on giving," Nov.13). I did feel that she left out the true reason that this political and intellectual lightweight is still around, or as Ms. Reimer so eloquently puts it, is the "gift that keeps on giving. " And that reason is that she is a very, very attractive women with all the right physical attributes: great figure, pretty hair, beautiful eyes and white teeth combined with a winning smile!
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 10, 2003
White Teeth, a zany satire about Britain coming to terms with diversity, is a case of PBS finally getting multiculturalism right. And, for the most part, what a delight. Public Television has been pressing the issue of multiculturalism since Pat Mitchell took over as president in 2000, generally with less than spectacular results. While the goal of making what is onscreen more representative of modern-day multicultural realities is laudable, the trick is doing it without compromising standards.
NEWS
October 9, 2003
An interview with Linda Williamson, a discussion leader for the Miller Midday Book Club. Why did you start this particular club? Our library wanted to make a daytime book club available to the community. A lot of senior citizens in this neighborhood are avid readers and wanted to participate in a book discussion. Another participant said that there weren't any openings anywhere in other clubs she knew of, so she was glad to come to this one. We were also looking for parents who might drop their kindergartners off at school and want to come in, or people who might want to come on their lunch hour.
NEWS
October 9, 2003
An interview with Linda Williamson, a discussion leader for the Miller Midday Book Club. Why did you start this particular club? Our library wanted to make a daytime book club available to the community. A lot of senior citizens in this neighborhood are avid readers and wanted to participate in a book discussion. Another participant said that there weren't any openings anywhere in other clubs she knew of, so she was glad to come to this one. We were also looking for parents who might drop their kindergartners off at school and want to come in, or people who might want to come on their lunch hour.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kay Chubbuck and By Kay Chubbuck,Special to the Sun | October 6, 2002
The Autograph Man, by Zadie Smith. Random House. 400 pages. $24.95. Alex-Li Tandem is the autograph man, a dealer in famous signatures. He lives in England on the fringes of the entertainment industry, "a minor incidence in the lives of others." He is a spectator, a collector, an observer in this bittersweet (and in some ways failed) new novel by Zadie Smith. Importantly, Alex-Li is also beset with an obsession. He wants -- no, needs -- the rare and elusive signature of Kitty Alexander, a screen star and glamour girl from the golden days of cinema.
NEWS
November 17, 2013
Susan Reimer 's recent column regarding Sarah Palin was spot on and laugh-out-loud hilarious ( "Sarah Palin: the gift that keeps on giving," Nov.13). I did feel that she left out the true reason that this political and intellectual lightweight is still around, or as Ms. Reimer so eloquently puts it, is the "gift that keeps on giving. " And that reason is that she is a very, very attractive women with all the right physical attributes: great figure, pretty hair, beautiful eyes and white teeth combined with a winning smile!
NEWS
By RICHARD RODRIGUEZ | November 8, 1994
Illegal immigration is the price we pay for erecting Coca-Cola billboards all over the world. In Manila as in Lima, America puts up huge self-advertisements.We advertise our beauty and our sexy glamour; we display our happy white teeth -- DRINK COKE.Today, many Californians are going to vote for Proposition 187, hoping to put an end to illegal immigration by denying government services to illegal immigrants and to their children. American politicians warn that ''the illegals'' are coming for our welfare dollars.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 25, 1993
About three-quarters of the way through the very, very long "Aspen Extreme," I heard a little boy -- the next, great, American critic, I'm sure -- turn to his mother and say, "Mommy, is this a real movie?"Of course, it isn't.Besides its interminable length and its surprising lack of razzle-dazzle skiing sequences, it turns out to be a moldy retread of youth tube TV cliches: "Beverly Hills 90210 Downhill," that sort of thing. It's jammed with angst and agony and self-doubt as it takes its uniformly attractive, dreary cast through the usual temptations and triumphs.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN COLUMNIST | August 8, 2003
Opening campaign speech of new California gubernatorial candidate Arnold Schwarzenegger: My friends: I stand before you, tanned and powerful, with perfect white teeth, but also humbled by your applause. People ask me: "Ah-nult, why are you running for governor?" Very simple, my friends. To win! To crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and to hear the lamentation of the women! Dat is what politics is about, my friends! As you know, dere are dose who would deny me this prize.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 10, 2003
White Teeth, a zany satire about Britain coming to terms with diversity, is a case of PBS finally getting multiculturalism right. And, for the most part, what a delight. Public Television has been pressing the issue of multiculturalism since Pat Mitchell took over as president in 2000, generally with less than spectacular results. While the goal of making what is onscreen more representative of modern-day multicultural realities is laudable, the trick is doing it without compromising standards.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kay Chubbuck and By Kay Chubbuck,Special to the Sun | October 6, 2002
The Autograph Man, by Zadie Smith. Random House. 400 pages. $24.95. Alex-Li Tandem is the autograph man, a dealer in famous signatures. He lives in England on the fringes of the entertainment industry, "a minor incidence in the lives of others." He is a spectator, a collector, an observer in this bittersweet (and in some ways failed) new novel by Zadie Smith. Importantly, Alex-Li is also beset with an obsession. He wants -- no, needs -- the rare and elusive signature of Kitty Alexander, a screen star and glamour girl from the golden days of cinema.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kay Chubbuck and Kay Chubbuck,Special to the Sun | May 7, 2000
"White Teeth," by Zadie Smith. Random House. 462 pages. $29.95. Not since Mary Shelley composed "Frankenstein" at the age of 19 has a bookish young woman made such an extraordinary debut. In this case, "White Teeth" was written during 24-year-old Zadie Smith's spare time at Cambridge University. But make no mistake: it's no Brideshead Regurgitated. Instead, this novel has zest. It bubbles and pops in its imaginative intensity. Smith's intent: a comic portrayal of what it means to be "ethnic."
NEWS
By RICHARD RODRIGUEZ | November 8, 1994
Illegal immigration is the price we pay for erecting Coca-Cola billboards all over the world. In Manila as in Lima, America puts up huge self-advertisements.We advertise our beauty and our sexy glamour; we display our happy white teeth -- DRINK COKE.Today, many Californians are going to vote for Proposition 187, hoping to put an end to illegal immigration by denying government services to illegal immigrants and to their children. American politicians warn that ''the illegals'' are coming for our welfare dollars.
NEWS
January 28, 2007
Craig named head of regional council County Executive David R. Craig has been elected chairman of the Baltimore Metropolitan Council, a regional planning council made up of elected officials from jurisdictions including Baltimore City and Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Harford and Howard counties. As chairman, Craig will be responsible for guiding the council in its efforts to improve quality of life and enhance economic vitality in the region. "Fostering a collaborative approach to solving the challenges faced by a growing economy and surging population, has been, and will continue to be, an area of primary focus for me," Craig said in a news release announcing the appointment.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | January 16, 2005
I'm a conservative investor with eight years until retirement. I own shares of Colgate-Palmolive Co. in my portfolio. What is the outlook for the company? - B.C., via the Internet This global consumer products giant famous for toothpaste, dishwashing liquid, Ajax detergent and Irish Spring soap is cleaning house. It is cutting 4,400 jobs worldwide, or 12 percent of its work force, and shutting down 25 of its 78 factories in a new four-year restructuring plan. Greater emphasis will be placed on distribution, sales and promotion, where it lags rival Procter & Gamble Co. The company expects to post $200 million in charges in 2005 while saving $45 million.
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