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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | November 27, 1998
At the start of this century, Maryland's population of white-tailed deer was so small that hunting them was prohibited statewide in 1902. As the 21st century approaches, the whitetail is back in such force that the state is counting on hunters more than ever to thin the herd."
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January 7, 2013
While it's bustling with activity every weekend, the Anita C. Leight Estuary Center in Abingdon is going to be particularly busy on Jan. 12, with three major programs that will offer something for all ages throughout the day. The white-tailed deer survey kicks off the day at 9 a.m. and continues until 11. Harford County seems to be experiencing explosive population growth - and not just with humans. So, estuary center managers need help from anyone 16 or older to determine if the deer population of Leight Park is a healthy size.
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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | October 19, 2007
FINKSBURG -- The start of one of Maryland's most popular hunting seasons gave state wildlife managers their first look at the effects of a deadly virus on the white-tailed deer population. Biologists were at taxidermy and butcher shops yesterday for the first day of the two-day-early muzzleloader season to look at the health of deer and to ask hunters whether they have seen signs of epizootic hemorrhagic disease, a naturally occurring outbreak that happens every year on the East Coast.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2012
Two days after hundreds of thousands of turkeys were consumed at dinner tables across the state, white-tailed and sika deers are now in the crosshairs for hunters looking to feast on venison. The state's two-week deer firearm season is scheduled to begin Saturday and run through Dec. 8. Brian Eyler, deer project leader for the Maryland Department of Natural of Resources, said Friday that an estimated 40,000 to 50,000 of the state's deer population will likely be harvested during the two-week hunt, including up to 15,000 on Saturday.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1997
I'VE ALWAYS prized being close to nature, but in recent years I've been forcibly reminded that such associations aren't always benign.The first time was in November 1995, when striking a white-tailed deer buck nearly totaled my Honda on U.S. 50 north of Easton. In November 1996, my Toyota collided with another deer near Cambridge.Then, this spring, several days after walking in a Talbot County woods loaded with deer ticks, I came down with Lyme disease.In all of this, I'm in plenty of company.
SPORTS
September 8, 1991
1. Mt. Nebo Wildlife Management AreaLocation: 3 miles north of Oakland, Garrett CountySize: 1,763 acresSelect species: White-tailed deer, ruffed grouse, woodcock, wild turkey, squirrel, cottontail rabbit, wood duck, black duck and mallardMailing address: Mt. Nebo Work Center, Route 1, Box 305A, Oakland, Md., 21550. Telephone: (301) 334-4255.2. Deep Creek Lake State ParkLocation: Thayerville, Garrett CountySize: Hunting is permitted on 1,200 acresSelect species: White-tailed deer, wild turkey, squirrel and grouseMailing address: Deep Creek Lake State Park, Route 2, Box 70,Swanton, Md. 21561.
SPORTS
January 1, 2011
Gene Boyd is 73 and lived in the Baltimore area from 1956 to 2004. A deer hunter who called Garrett County his favorite spot, Boyd asks: Years ago, white-tailed deer season for firearms started on the Friday after Thanksgiving. It was changed to Saturday, the story goes, because wives complained that their husbands were going hunting rather than spending the holiday at home. Can you tell me when this change took place? Outdoors Girl searched the Sun archives and asked veteran hunters if they could recall a Friday opening day, to no avail.
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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1996
At the start of the 20th century, white-tailed deer in Maryland were few and limited to the remote, forested areas of the state. Now, on the threshold of the 21st century, the latest estimates put the state's deer population at more than 300,000.In those 10 decades, much has changed.Unregulated market hunting was abolished. The clear-cutting of expanses of forest has been curtailed. Millions of dollars in state and federal money have been spent to restore good habitat.And the whitetail itself has adapted and proliferated to the point where wildlife biologists are concerned the herd soon will exceed the capacity of the land to feed and shelter it.Tom Mathews, game program supervisor for the Department of Natural Resources, said recently that in all but the mountainous areas of the state's western counties, "the deer population is a problem."
SPORTS
March 6, 1994
DEER SEASONSMajor change would be establishment of a three-day muzzleloader season on Oct. 20, 21, 22 in addition to traditional season in December. During the early muzzleloader season, bow hunters would be required to wear hunter orange and any deer taken with a bow on those dates would count toward bow-season limit.BOW SEASONS* WHITE-TAILEDDates -- Sept. 15-Nov. 25, Dec. 12-16, Jan. 2-31.Areas -- all counties.Bag limits -- One antlered or antlerless with standard license. Additional antlerless white-tailed deer may be taken in Somerset, Wicomico and Worcester counties.
NEWS
By Kristin Sette and Kristin Sette,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2002
Carol Fox is determined to frustrate the white-tailed deer that feed in her West Friendship garden. She has erected an electric fence and sprayed repellents on the vegetables. And when the deer began eating the bottoms of her pine trees, Fox blocked their pathway and spread wooden pallets on the ground to discourage them from hopping the fence. Some deer are still getting in, but Fox said she will keep trying. "It's a balance of things," said Fox, 62, a master gardener who lives on 11 acres in western Howard.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2012
A number of hunting regulation changes are being considered by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources Wildlife and Heritage Service as a result of receiving more than 1,000 comments at stakeholder meetings, public hearings and online forums. The changes, which would go into effect this fall for two years, have been endorsed by the Maryland Wildlife Advisory Commission. The proposals include extending the archery season for white-tailed and sika deer, as well as the fox hunting season, and reopening the river otter season in Allegany and Garrett counties.
SPORTS
January 1, 2011
Gene Boyd is 73 and lived in the Baltimore area from 1956 to 2004. A deer hunter who called Garrett County his favorite spot, Boyd asks: Years ago, white-tailed deer season for firearms started on the Friday after Thanksgiving. It was changed to Saturday, the story goes, because wives complained that their husbands were going hunting rather than spending the holiday at home. Can you tell me when this change took place? Outdoors Girl searched the Sun archives and asked veteran hunters if they could recall a Friday opening day, to no avail.
NEWS
August 27, 2008
The abundance of deer around Baltimore's Loch Raven Reservoir is no mere nuisance. It has damaged the forest, wiping out habitat for other species and threatening the region's drinking water supply. Under those circumstances, limited hunting on the city-owned property is not only a reasonable but also an overdue decision. Authorities in Baltimore and Baltimore County plan to allow seasonal bowhunting on the northern portions of Loch Raven beginning in mid-September and then employ licensed professional deer hunters to conduct a closely supervised and targeted harvest of animals in the southern areas early next year.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | October 22, 2007
A few weeks ago, this column was an unrestrained tirade on the subject of deer - focusing on the animals' insidious quest to crash through the windshields of passing motorists. That same day, through no design I'm aware of, another section of The Sun ran a sensitive and sympathetic feature by Abigail Tucker about two Baltimore County women who have made it their mission to protect the adorable white-tailed creatures from the depredations of bloodthirsty hunters. Judging by the e-mail received by Tucker and myself, our readership is rich in Bambi-phobic misanthropes.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | October 19, 2007
FINKSBURG -- The start of one of Maryland's most popular hunting seasons gave state wildlife managers their first look at the effects of a deadly virus on the white-tailed deer population. Biologists were at taxidermy and butcher shops yesterday for the first day of the two-day-early muzzleloader season to look at the health of deer and to ask hunters whether they have seen signs of epizootic hemorrhagic disease, a naturally occurring outbreak that happens every year on the East Coast.
NEWS
By KRISTI FUNDERBURK AND LIZ F. KAY and KRISTI FUNDERBURK AND LIZ F. KAY,SUN REPORTERS | August 9, 2006
The beauty of the Soldiers Delight Natural Environment Area is, as the sign proclaims, "enhanced by rare plants and animals." But one breed of animal is overrunning the refuge and devouring the unusual plants, and state wildlife officials say there is only one way to solve the problem. They want bowhunters to thin the deer population. "A few deer is a few deer too many if they get to those plant species and wipe them out," said Paul Peditto, director of the Wildlife and Heritage Service for Maryland's Department of Natural Resources.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2012
Two days after hundreds of thousands of turkeys were consumed at dinner tables across the state, white-tailed and sika deers are now in the crosshairs for hunters looking to feast on venison. The state's two-week deer firearm season is scheduled to begin Saturday and run through Dec. 8. Brian Eyler, deer project leader for the Maryland Department of Natural of Resources, said Friday that an estimated 40,000 to 50,000 of the state's deer population will likely be harvested during the two-week hunt, including up to 15,000 on Saturday.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | November 21, 2004
COME NEXT Saturday, there will be more hunters in Maryland's woods than there will be football fans today at M&T Bank Stadium. Count on it. The Department of Natural Resources estimates that close to 75,000 of the state's 123,000 licensed hunters will mark the opening of the two-week deer firearms season with a walk in the woods. And this time next week, a lot of them will be back out there for the second of two Sundays of hunting. Deer skin vs. pigskin? You decide. Stadium capacity: 69,084.
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