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By Sherrilyn A. Ifill | June 17, 2001
THE RECENT SPATE of cases in which whites have been charged or prosecuted for racially motivated murders dating back to the civil rights era may signal an opportunity for healing in communities scarred by the legacy of racial violence. The conviction of Thomas E. Blanton Jr. in the 1963 murder of four young black women at the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., and the recent decision by prosecutors to charge the mayor of York, Pa., and eight other men with murder of a black mother by a white gang during riots in 1969 has undoubtedly brought some measure of satisfaction to those who suffered the agonizing pain of losing their loved ones in "unresolved" racial murders.
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By Jonah Goldberg | November 21, 2013
In Britain to promote her film "The Butler," Oprah Winfrey gave an interview to the BBC this month. Not surprisingly, she promoted her movie about race relations in the White House with comments about race relations and the White House. The BBC's Will Gompertz asked: "Has it ever crossed your mind that some of the treatment of Obama and the challenges he's faced and some of the reporting he's received is because he's an African-American?" Now there's a fresh take. Either Mr. Gompertz has been handcuffed to a radiator in someone's windowless basement for the last five years or, more likely, he was riffing off the suggested questions Ms. Winfrey's PR team handed out to interviewers.
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By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 26, 2000
HAYDEN LAKE, Idaho - It was an ugly incident on a lonely country road. Victoria Keenan and her teen-age son, driving home through the summer twilight, were chased and beaten outside the neo-Nazi Aryan Nations compound by a truckload of security guards. Two men were sentenced to prison in the 1998 attack. But civil rights groups want more. In an Idaho courtroom next week, they will attempt by way of the legal system to do what they haven't been able to in more than two decades: Shut down the Aryan Nations compound - with its barbed wire, watchtower, chapel and "Whites Only" sign.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | March 13, 2011
There is a scholarship for students who wear outfits made of duct tape to their proms. David Letterman offers a scholarship for kids with average grades. There are scholarships for students who vote Democratic (or Republican), scholarships for students who have cancer, diabetes, sickle cell, autism or Tourette's, students named Zolp, students who are blind, deaf, vegan, Arizonan, left handed, low income, African-, Hispanic-, Native-, Asian- or woman-American. So it's hard to get worked up over a new scholarship for students who are white men. It is offered by the Texas-based Former Majority Association for Equality, which would want you to know that it is not motivated by racism.
NEWS
By Kenneth Lavon Johnson | August 2, 2007
Last month, about one hour after my arrival in Atlanta to visit a family member, I was confronted, once again, with the burden that all black men in this country face on a daily basis. I was standing in front of my relative's home in an upscale neighborhood, surveying the beauty that surrounded me, when a white woman in her early 30s approached me, with her dog, from across the street. She asked me, in a rather hostile voice, "Are you waiting for someone?" I responded by saying, "Good afternoon.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 12, 1995
ATLANTA -- More than 30 of the nation's most radical right-wing militias and an Idaho-based neo-Nazi group with a history of violence have simultaneously launched intelligence-gathering operations aimed at government agencies, civil rights organizations and the media, according to a civil rights organization.The move, coming on the heels of the April 19 Oklahoma City bombing, has alarmed experts who monitor the radical right. They say they fear that a coordinated intelligence network could lay the groundwork for a "jihad"-style campaign of terror directed at individuals and agencies seen as enemies by the groups.
NEWS
By ANN LOLORDO and ANN LOLORDO,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- They spoke to a man and a nation. They welcomed African-Americans to the Million Man March with a call for action. They warned millions of other Americans that they will unite against the forces that seek to divide the black community.In sermons and speeches, poetry and song, march organizers and the collection of African-Americans brought to the podium urged their black brothers to atone for their sins and change their ways. They demanded the same of white America that refuses to give blacks their due.From the leader of the Nation of Islam who called for this march to a 10-year-old Maryland girl who recited a poem, the speakers offered hope and inspiration, encouragement and critiques, life lessons and lectures to a crowd on The Mall mall and the nation at large.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | March 27, 1996
Finally some people are beginning to see Hollywood for what it is: the last bastion of white supremacy in America.You read it right. Hollywood. Not the skinheads. Not the KKK. Not right-wing militia loonies. Hollywood. Tinseltown moguls don't spew hatred or attack minorities. Their damage is done in much more subtle and insidious ways.On Monday night, Hollywood handed out its Oscar awards at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences annual orgy of self-indulgence. As usual, it was a white thing.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 25, 2006
So let me get this straight: folks at the National Black Republican Association put out an ad that's considered so offensive that a black Republican has to ask them to slow their roll? Oh, don't you love living in America? Last Thursday, Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele, no doubt realizing that he's going to need a boodle of Democratic votes if he has any shot at being elected Maryland's next U.S. senator, issued a news release condemning the NBRA radio ad. The ad is "insulting to Marylanders and should come down immediately," Steele's release reads.
NEWS
June 30, 2010
I was shocked by your report of Sen. Barbara Mikulski's effusive praise for the late senator and one-time Klansman Robert Byrd. It demonstrated her detachment from a vast segment of Marylanders and her supreme confidence in easy re-election. Senator Mikulski represents Maryland, the native soil of Frederick Douglass and Thurgood Marshall; the home of America's most venerable and venerated African-American newspaper; the cradle of a civil rights movement that got its sea legs in Baltimore and changed our nation.
NEWS
By Chris Myers Asch | January 18, 2011
The tragedy in Arizona has sparked nationwide soul-searching and calls for more civility from across the political spectrum. Seldom is there an issue on which President Barack Obama, House Speaker John Boehner, The New York Times and Sen. John McCain can agree. At the risk of being deemed insensitive and out of touch with the times, I (respectfully) want to stress the necessity of incivility. While we all rightfully condemn the violence in Tucson, we also should recognize the value that incivility has in a democracy.
NEWS
June 30, 2010
I was shocked by your report of Sen. Barbara Mikulski's effusive praise for the late senator and one-time Klansman Robert Byrd. It demonstrated her detachment from a vast segment of Marylanders and her supreme confidence in easy re-election. Senator Mikulski represents Maryland, the native soil of Frederick Douglass and Thurgood Marshall; the home of America's most venerable and venerated African-American newspaper; the cradle of a civil rights movement that got its sea legs in Baltimore and changed our nation.
NEWS
By Kenneth Lavon Johnson | August 2, 2007
Last month, about one hour after my arrival in Atlanta to visit a family member, I was confronted, once again, with the burden that all black men in this country face on a daily basis. I was standing in front of my relative's home in an upscale neighborhood, surveying the beauty that surrounded me, when a white woman in her early 30s approached me, with her dog, from across the street. She asked me, in a rather hostile voice, "Are you waiting for someone?" I responded by saying, "Good afternoon.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 25, 2006
So let me get this straight: folks at the National Black Republican Association put out an ad that's considered so offensive that a black Republican has to ask them to slow their roll? Oh, don't you love living in America? Last Thursday, Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele, no doubt realizing that he's going to need a boodle of Democratic votes if he has any shot at being elected Maryland's next U.S. senator, issued a news release condemning the NBRA radio ad. The ad is "insulting to Marylanders and should come down immediately," Steele's release reads.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | December 24, 2002
AS A white Southerner who voted in the 1948 presidential election, I think Sen. Trent Lott and the resultant commentary are giving 1940s-style white Southern segregationists a bad name. I lived in Georgia in 1948. It and six other of the 11 states of the old Confederacy voted for President Harry Truman. We Crackers gave the president three times as many votes as we gave Mr. Thurmond. That was a predominantly white vote, too. Most Southern blacks were still disenfranchised then, and many if not most, of those who weren't voted Republican.
TOPIC
By Sherrilyn A. Ifill | June 17, 2001
THE RECENT SPATE of cases in which whites have been charged or prosecuted for racially motivated murders dating back to the civil rights era may signal an opportunity for healing in communities scarred by the legacy of racial violence. The conviction of Thomas E. Blanton Jr. in the 1963 murder of four young black women at the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., and the recent decision by prosecutors to charge the mayor of York, Pa., and eight other men with murder of a black mother by a white gang during riots in 1969 has undoubtedly brought some measure of satisfaction to those who suffered the agonizing pain of losing their loved ones in "unresolved" racial murders.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | December 24, 2002
AS A white Southerner who voted in the 1948 presidential election, I think Sen. Trent Lott and the resultant commentary are giving 1940s-style white Southern segregationists a bad name. I lived in Georgia in 1948. It and six other of the 11 states of the old Confederacy voted for President Harry Truman. We Crackers gave the president three times as many votes as we gave Mr. Thurmond. That was a predominantly white vote, too. Most Southern blacks were still disenfranchised then, and many if not most, of those who weren't voted Republican.
NEWS
By NELL IRVIN PAINTER | May 16, 1994
Princeton, New Jersey. -- Forty years ago tomorrow a unanimous Supreme Court handed down the Brown vs. Board of Education decision. It was a turning point not only in history of U.S. race relations, but also in the history of the United States as a whole. As a kid I read the news and wondered whether Brown would really make a difference.The immediate aftermath did not promise the dismantling of American apartheid. Brown produced inaction from the Republican White House of Dwight D. Eisenhower.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 26, 2000
HAYDEN LAKE, Idaho - It was an ugly incident on a lonely country road. Victoria Keenan and her teen-age son, driving home through the summer twilight, were chased and beaten outside the neo-Nazi Aryan Nations compound by a truckload of security guards. Two men were sentenced to prison in the 1998 attack. But civil rights groups want more. In an Idaho courtroom next week, they will attempt by way of the legal system to do what they haven't been able to in more than two decades: Shut down the Aryan Nations compound - with its barbed wire, watchtower, chapel and "Whites Only" sign.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | July 16, 2000
IT'S BEEN MORE than a year since some folks cheered the impending death of Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan. Those of you who did know who you are. When word of Farrakhan's prostate cancer hit newspapers, television and radio, some grinned and chuckled and cackled at the prospect of the "Jew-baiting black racist's" impending demise. Some, no doubt, danced a joyous jig. There was only one problem: Farrakhan wasn't dead yet. On Thursday, just before 8:50 p.m., one Louis Farrakhan, resplendent in an impeccably tailored, double-breasted, royal blue suit, walked in front of an overflow crowd at the Bread of Life Cathedral.
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