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By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1995
A series of racial incidents at South Carroll High put state police on alert last week and have left students and staff members uneasy at the Winfield school.On Friday, about 20 white students came to school waving Confederate flags from their pickup trucks or wearing T-shirts with the flag and the words, "You wear your X, I'll wear mine," referring to Malcolm X and the crossed bars of the flag. About 25 of South Carroll's 1,338 students are black."I think the crisis is over," said Principal David Booz, as he watched over a peaceful lunch period yesterday.
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NEWS
March 7, 2014
Lansdowne High School's student film, "Better Learning," has received honorable mention in the first-ever White House Student Film Festival, according to a Friday release from Baltimore County Public Schools. Lansdowne senior Nathan Airey and junior Adam Robinson produced the three-minute movie, which describes how technology has positively affected the way students at the school on Hollins Ferry Road learn and how it will continue to do so. "This student film is a great example of how technology is already a fundamental learning tool in classrooms throughout Baltimore County," said Superintendent Dallas Dance, according to the release.
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NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 3, 2003
Last year, students at Taylor County High in Butler, Ga., made history by holding the school's first prom for both whites and blacks, who previously attended separate spring dances in a lingering vestige from the days of segregation. But the good will generated by that first integrated prom, whose theme was "Making it Last Forever," proved short-lived - this year's dance has been split in two again. A group of white students held their own prom last night, while a second gathering, which is expected to draw people of both races, will be held next weekend.
NEWS
May 10, 2013
I found Patrick Sheridan's letter about heritage to be quite disconcerting and felt compelled to respond. In making the statement that African Americans by their very existence have a richer heritage than others is a racist statement. Are African Americans comprised of richer heritages than those born in the Middle East or Greece with thousands of years of civilization? Does the author feel that those of Gaelic or Celtic heritages did not suffer at the hands of Romans or Britain under their cruel and oppressive rule?
NEWS
March 14, 2005
A QUIET BUT noteworthy trend is occurring at historically black colleges and universities around the country: More white students are enrolling. This is a welcome, if ironic, development at institutions founded when racism denied higher education to blacks. White enrollment at these institutions, known as HBCUs, grew 65 percent during the last 25 years, from 21,000 to 35,000. Nationwide, white enrollment at publicly funded HBCUs is at 13 percent. The increase in enrollment by whites and, to a lesser extent, by Hispanic and Asian-American students is the result of outreach by the schools, more affordable tuitions and shifting attitudes and perceptions by whites who once viewed the schools as unwelcoming and of lesser quality.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 23, 1995
Imagine, for a moment, that Asian teachers dominated the school system in which you live. Imagine they taught white and Asian students, and that the white students were told at every opportunity that Asians scored higher on intelligence and standardized tests.Imagine these white students picked up the morning paper and spotted a headline that read "White Students Continue To Lag Behind Asians." Imagine the Asian teachers had no expectations that the whites could perform academically, that white students were routinely shunted off to special education classes while Asians dominated the gifted and talented programs.
NEWS
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,Contributing Writer | July 25, 1993
When Geneva Pope attended the old Bel Air Colored High School in the 1940s, she had to read books no longer deemed fit for white students. But she and her classmates first had to erase profanities and racial slurs that white students had left on the tattered pages.White students caught buses to schools. Blacks had none, even if they lived nearly 20 miles away.When they arrived at the Colored High School, black students found plumbing in disrepair and walked outside for toilets. In winter, they shivered until they fired up the stoves in the morning.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | June 23, 2000
Emphasizing that they are seeking a partnership with Maryland, not a confrontation, officials from the Office of Civil Rights told state education officials yesterday that they expect to have a final agreement on desegregation signed by the end of September. "I think this is good news today," Patricia S. Florestano, the state secretary of higher education, said after the three-hour meeting with federal officials in Annapolis. "They told us instead of setting goals for us that ... we can write our own plan and set our own goals."
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff writer | May 3, 1992
A fight over racial slurs led to the arrest of three Glenelg High School students last week and prompted two days of dialogue between black and white students on racial issues.Hundreds of students had gathered to see the after-school fight, which occurred in a vacant wooded lot on Sharp Road. Police and teachers helped break it up.Police charged a white male student with assault Tuesday after he allegedly pushed a teacher trying to break up the inter-racial fight among nine students.Police arrested two black male students the next day, charging them with possession of weapons.
NEWS
June 21, 1994
A recent article in The Sun by staff writer Lan Nguyen focused on the preponderance of school suspensions given to black students, particularly males. Nationally, black students were suspended in 1992 at three times the rate of white students. In Maryland, the gap was sometimes wider: In Howard and Harford counties, black students were suspended almost five times as often as non-blacks; in Anne Arundel, Baltimore and Carroll counties, blacks were punished at least twice as often.Educators have recognized a problem that needs to be addressed.
NEWS
April 18, 2013
In case no one has noticed it yet, two-thirds of Towson University's past and current student body is and remains white. The current and past regime's mantra of "inclusion" and "diversity" is nothing more than a thinly veiled attempt to disenfranchise the whites. This includes the recent Title 9 female over male baseball mess that the current TU president botched. TU is fine with all new ideas, just as long as they are theirs. During 1970-72 as an elected Student Government Association senator, I stood behind the effort to form a Black Student Union.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
Towson University is trying to reassure its student population and address the concerns of national civil rights groups after a pro-white race student group recently announced it would conduct crime-watching patrols at night. Matthew Heimbach, a Towson senior and founder of the White Student Union, made headlines across the country earlier this week for the patrols, which he said were in response to a spike in black-on-white crime. Heimbach said the patrol members would be unarmed except for flashlights and pepper spray, though he had previously told Towson's student newspaper his members have gotten firearms training.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2013
Barely a week after the group made national news for advocating for racial segregation at the Conservative Political Action Conference, Towson University's White Student Union is again drawing attention for plans to conduct nighttime patrols to watch for crime. Matthew Heimbach, a 21-year-old senior and founder of the group, said his group plans to go out a few nights a week - the men armed with only Maglite flashlights, the women with pepper spray - and will attempt to make a citizen's arrest if they witness a "violent felony.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | February 22, 2010
By the start of classes in August 2011, white students in Howard County are expected to be a minority, joining those in Baltimore County. The two school systems are riding a demographic wave that carries broad implications for how students are taught. Baltimore County two years ago joined Baltimore City and Montgomery, Prince George's, Charles and Somerset counties as Maryland jurisdictions where minorities outnumber white students in public schools, although the development was little noticed at the time.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | November 2, 2008
The 1,000 or so students in Baltimore County's Class of 2009 who have yet to satisfy state test requirements for graduation are going to remedial classes, attending after-school programs and being pulled out during class and lunch for extra instruction as schools strive to help them meet the mark. Administrators and teachers are also making an appeal to parents, reminding them of what's at stake this year and what they can do to ensure that their children get their diplomas. "The message is real clear to kids: 'Now I've got to pass this,' " said Stephen A. Edgar, principal of Parkville High School, referring to the exams that are now mandatory for graduation.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Sun reporter | July 15, 2008
Statewide test scores for African-American and low-income children rose significantly this year and are moving closer to parity with other students, according to data released today by state education officials. The Maryland scores were buoyed by large gains in Baltimore City and Prince George's County, where there are large black and poor populations, but the trend was also seen in Anne Arundel County and other areas of the state. For the fifth year in a row, scores improved across the state on the Maryland School Assessment, a test given in grades three through eight, as part of the federal No Child Left Behind Act. Last school year, 86 percent of elementary students passed the reading test and 84 percent passed the math.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Ivan Penn contributed to this article | October 18, 1996
Two interracial fights within the past week at Wilde Lake High School are prompting a call by Howard County's African American Coalition for more peer mediation and conflict-training courses at the west Columbia school.Police, parents and community leaders have met over the past two days to discuss the incidents and talk with students, according to Wilde Lake officials. The Rev. Robert Turner, president of the coalition, is asking school administrators to offer more programs for students to learn to deal with their cultural differences.
NEWS
By Howard P. Rawlings and Robert A. Kronley | May 10, 1999
MARYLAND has made more progress than virtually any other Southern state in expanding opportunities in higher education for African-American students. State leaders are committed to developing a comprehensive plan that provides opportunities and ensures academic excellence for all students.Maryland's emphasis on accountability in our schools has resulted in more students from all backgrounds getting the quality education they need for success in college and the workplace. And the state's scholarship programs have created a pathway to higher education for more of our young people.
NEWS
May 18, 2008
More suspensions the wrong answer The adage that experience is the best teacher is an appropriate response to those who believe school suspensions are the way to push children who misbehave out of our school systems ("Discipline's Cost," May 11). History demonstrates that the zero-tolerance policy has failed to act as a deterrent to students. Nine percent of the students in Maryland's public schools were suspended in the 2006-2007 school year, and that figure was up from just 6 percent 15 years earlier.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Sun reporter | January 2, 2008
The faces of Maryland's public school children have quietly been changing over the past several years, and minorities - primarily Hispanics, Asians and African-Americans - now outnumber white students in the state. Maryland public school enrollment data show that 48 percent of the students in the state's 24 school systems are white. African-Americans represent 38 percent of the school population, Hispanics 8 percent and Asian-Americans most of the remaining 6 percent.
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