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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2002
Richard Zaworski of Baltimore requested a recipe for Oyster Pot Pie. "Years ago," he wrote, "my mother made it for my family and we enjoyed it a great deal, but no one can remember the recipe." Marlene Zaworski Mundie, no address given, responded. "I have had this recipe for a few years, but it is not a family recipe. My husband loves it. It is especially good when it snows outside. The white sauce can also be used for chipped beef." And, noting the name of the man seeking the recipe, she added, "Maybe I'll find a lost relative."
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NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 7, 2006
Nancy Johnson of Springdale, Ark., was looking for a lost recipe for a white barbecue sauce. Barbara Diggs of Newcastle, Wyo., sent in a version she enjoys for a white barbecue sauce from a collection of annual recipes from Southern Living magazine. I tested this recipe on chicken pieces, which I marinated in the sauce for about an hour then precooked slightly in the microwave before finishing them on the grill. I basted the chicken pieces with the sauce as they grilled. The result was a moist and flavorful chicken with a slightly piquant taste.
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FEATURES
September 2, 1998
Ask the AthletesWhat is your favorite pizza topping?Kordell Stewart, quarterback, Pittsburgh Steelers:"I like the supreme - black olives, hot peppers, pepperoni, everything."Annika Sorenstam, professional golfer:"Pineapple. I enjoy the sweetness of the fruit on the pizza."Greg Maddux, pitcher, Atlanta Braves:"Jalapeo peppers. They are spicy, and I like 'em!"Jayson Williams, forward, New Jersey Nets:"I like white pizza. It has white cheese and white sauce. I eat pizza once a day!"VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.SIKIDS.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | December 4, 2002
FROM NOW until the new year, there is a temptation to work a little harder in the kitchen than you normally do, to knock yourself out. One way to cope with this surge of feelings is to stretch out on the sofa, put a cold washcloth on your forehead, and wait for the sensation to pass. Perhaps that is what I should have done the other day when I considered making the leek-and-shrimp lasagna. Instead, I succumbed to the impulse to make something rich and elegant that would be a delicious holiday dish.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2002
Ann Popovich of Jeannette, Pa., requested a recipe for vegetable lasagna "with a cream sauce and no tomatoes." Bryon Predika of Baltimore responded with tester Laura Reiley's choice. Vegetable Lasagna Serves 18 6 cups thinly sliced onions (about 3 large) 1 stick butter 1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon flour 1 1/2 quarts milk 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg 1/8 teaspoon white pepper 1 teaspoon dry mustard 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 3 pounds ricotta cheese 2 eggs 2 to 3 large cloves garlic 1/3 cup chopped parsley 1/4 teaspoon oregano 1/4 teaspoon basil 1/8 teaspoon thyme 2/3 cup grated Romano cheese 1 pound lasagna noodles 1/2 pound asparagus tips, cut into bite-sized pieces 1/3 pound snow peas 1/2 pound mushrooms, sliced 1 pound grated sharp cheddar cheese 1 pound grated Swiss cheese 1 ounce pine nuts In a large skillet with a lid, saute the onions in butter until limp.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2001
Mildred P. Herbert of Sykesville requested Haussner's restaurant's recipe for imperial crab. "Many of us were not fortunate to visit one last time." Deborah L. Hiteshew of Baltimore responded with a recipe. She wrote: "I copied it from The Sun in the '80s and have since passed it on to many friends." Haussner's Crab Imperial Serves 6 as an appetizer 1 pound crab meat 2 slices white bread 2 eggs, beaten 4 tablespoons mayonnaise 1 teaspoon prepared mustard 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon black pepper 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 1/2 teaspoon chopped parsley White Sauce (see recipe below)
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | December 4, 2002
FROM NOW until the new year, there is a temptation to work a little harder in the kitchen than you normally do, to knock yourself out. One way to cope with this surge of feelings is to stretch out on the sofa, put a cold washcloth on your forehead, and wait for the sensation to pass. Perhaps that is what I should have done the other day when I considered making the leek-and-shrimp lasagna. Instead, I succumbed to the impulse to make something rich and elegant that would be a delicious holiday dish.
FEATURES
By Maria Hiaasen | April 16, 1997
Item: Hanover Side Dish Classics Pasta CapriWhat you get: 20 ounces (4 servings)Cost: $2.19Time to prepare: 7-9 minutes in the microwave or 7-10 minutes on stovetopReview: This satisfied a weeknight craving for veggies tossed in fancy pasta, and I didn't have to linger over the stove sauteeing garlic and stirring a white sauce. Fluffy malfalda pasta and colorful carrots, asparagus and red peppers come frozen in a bag with a small pouch of garlic and parmesan cheese sauce -- tangy, not overpowering.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | October 27, 1992
I had lunch the other day with a friend who, at 78, is bright, charming and articulate. Like most of us, he is still 16 in his heart and determined to enjoy every moment of his life to the fullest. He is also waging war against progressive paralysis and crippling arthritis.These conditions, like many other illnesses, have neither a nutritional cause nor cure. They do, however, create a nutritional problem.People with such limiting conditions find it especially difficult to shop for food and to prepare and eat meals.
FEATURES
By Felicia Gressette and Felicia Gressette,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 29, 1993
In culinary defense of the casserole, I would like to point out that cuisines the world over are dotted with them. Cassoulet, the famous French baked bean dish, is a casserole. So is choucroute garni -- sauerkraut baked with sausages and other smoked meats. So are lasagna, moussaka, jambalaya and arroz con pollo.Besides, there's nothing like a ready-for-the-oven casserole to bail out a tired working cook or save the day when friends decide to stay for supper. If the dish is frozen, just pop it into the microwave for a quick defrost, then bake as usual (adding a few extra minutes)
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2002
Ann Popovich of Jeannette, Pa., requested a recipe for vegetable lasagna "with a cream sauce and no tomatoes." Bryon Predika of Baltimore responded with tester Laura Reiley's choice. Vegetable Lasagna Serves 18 6 cups thinly sliced onions (about 3 large) 1 stick butter 1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon flour 1 1/2 quarts milk 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg 1/8 teaspoon white pepper 1 teaspoon dry mustard 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 3 pounds ricotta cheese 2 eggs 2 to 3 large cloves garlic 1/3 cup chopped parsley 1/4 teaspoon oregano 1/4 teaspoon basil 1/8 teaspoon thyme 2/3 cup grated Romano cheese 1 pound lasagna noodles 1/2 pound asparagus tips, cut into bite-sized pieces 1/3 pound snow peas 1/2 pound mushrooms, sliced 1 pound grated sharp cheddar cheese 1 pound grated Swiss cheese 1 ounce pine nuts In a large skillet with a lid, saute the onions in butter until limp.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2002
Richard Zaworski of Baltimore requested a recipe for Oyster Pot Pie. "Years ago," he wrote, "my mother made it for my family and we enjoyed it a great deal, but no one can remember the recipe." Marlene Zaworski Mundie, no address given, responded. "I have had this recipe for a few years, but it is not a family recipe. My husband loves it. It is especially good when it snows outside. The white sauce can also be used for chipped beef." And, noting the name of the man seeking the recipe, she added, "Maybe I'll find a lost relative."
NEWS
By Jody Vilschick and Jody Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 31, 2001
Busy Dobbin Center has a busy Chinese restaurant, Wok 175, tucked behind the fast-food joints. "We've owned Wok 175 since 1991 - about three years after it opened," owner Billy Wong said. Wok 175 brings decades of experience in cooking Chinese cuisine, according to Wong. "Our head chef is my father-in-law," he said. "He's been a chef for 40 years - 30 of which in Columbia restaurants." According to Wong, the restaurant serves Americanized Mandarin-style food and a variety of dishes in other styles.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2001
Mildred P. Herbert of Sykesville requested Haussner's restaurant's recipe for imperial crab. "Many of us were not fortunate to visit one last time." Deborah L. Hiteshew of Baltimore responded with a recipe. She wrote: "I copied it from The Sun in the '80s and have since passed it on to many friends." Haussner's Crab Imperial Serves 6 as an appetizer 1 pound crab meat 2 slices white bread 2 eggs, beaten 4 tablespoons mayonnaise 1 teaspoon prepared mustard 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon black pepper 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 1/2 teaspoon chopped parsley White Sauce (see recipe below)
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | May 24, 2000
Vera L. Francisco of Baltimore requested a recipe for Salmon Cakes similar to those served at Love's restaurant at 25th and Charles streets before it closed. Walter Niles of Spearfish, S.D., responded with a recipe that he said his late mother-in-law, who lived in Washington, D.C., had made. He said flaked halibut could be used in lieu of salmon but without the lemon juice the recipe calls for. Maxine A. Dubinsky of Owings Mills was looking for a Gefilte-Fish Loaf recipe, which "was once available from Bluefeld/Danielle caterers, which has gone out of business."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,Special to the Sun | July 22, 1999
It's hard to say what we liked more about the location of Brown's Wharf -- the long expanse of windows letting in the view of the harbor or the slow honk of tugboats pulling away from the Broadway Pier. It makes sense that tourists would be drawn to this Fells Point restaurant, especially with the water taxi stopping nearby. Tourists may not notice, however, what was apparent to us as soon as we opened our menus. They'll pay more for their meal on the water at Brown's Wharf than they would at similar but land-locked restaurants in the city.
NEWS
By Jody Vilschick and Jody Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 31, 2001
Busy Dobbin Center has a busy Chinese restaurant, Wok 175, tucked behind the fast-food joints. "We've owned Wok 175 since 1991 - about three years after it opened," owner Billy Wong said. Wok 175 brings decades of experience in cooking Chinese cuisine, according to Wong. "Our head chef is my father-in-law," he said. "He's been a chef for 40 years - 30 of which in Columbia restaurants." According to Wong, the restaurant serves Americanized Mandarin-style food and a variety of dishes in other styles.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | May 24, 2000
Vera L. Francisco of Baltimore requested a recipe for Salmon Cakes similar to those served at Love's restaurant at 25th and Charles streets before it closed. Walter Niles of Spearfish, S.D., responded with a recipe that he said his late mother-in-law, who lived in Washington, D.C., had made. He said flaked halibut could be used in lieu of salmon but without the lemon juice the recipe calls for. Maxine A. Dubinsky of Owings Mills was looking for a Gefilte-Fish Loaf recipe, which "was once available from Bluefeld/Danielle caterers, which has gone out of business."
FEATURES
September 2, 1998
Ask the AthletesWhat is your favorite pizza topping?Kordell Stewart, quarterback, Pittsburgh Steelers:"I like the supreme - black olives, hot peppers, pepperoni, everything."Annika Sorenstam, professional golfer:"Pineapple. I enjoy the sweetness of the fruit on the pizza."Greg Maddux, pitcher, Atlanta Braves:"Jalapeo peppers. They are spicy, and I like 'em!"Jayson Williams, forward, New Jersey Nets:"I like white pizza. It has white cheese and white sauce. I eat pizza once a day!"VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.SIKIDS.
FEATURES
By Cathy Thomas and Cathy Thomas,Orange County Register | December 31, 1997
Even in early-childhood attempts at cooking, I found hot vegetables teamed with melted cheese an irresistible combination. At 8, I got mixed reviews from my family when I slathered perfectly innocent buds of blanched broccoli with warm, processed cheese from a jar. The cheese formed an eerie orange mask over the warm florets, creating a smooth, porcelain-like finish that filled every nook and cranny.It was one of my first tries at creating drama on a plate. I loved it. I tried it with everything from baked potatoes to brussels sprouts.
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