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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 24, 1992
After a fast, smart start, "White Sands" implodes like a black hole, sucking all goodwill from the atmosphere of the theater, turning those of us who started to love it into embittered cuckolds.Great setup: Willem Dafoe, a deputy sheriff in New Mexico, comes across the body of a possible suicide in the desert. Besides a bullet in the head and a gun in the hand, the stiff is clutching (with the other hand) a suitcase loaded with $500,000 in small, dirty bills.Everything in the early sequences is absolutely first rate.
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NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,Los Angeles Times | December 23, 2006
Catching a break with the Florida weather yesterday afternoon, the space shuttle Discovery made a perfect sunset landing at Kennedy Space Center. Mission controllers had waved off an earlier landing opportunity because of storms and low clouds, but the weather unexpectedly cleared enough to allow the attempt. Had the weather not cleared at Kennedy, Discovery would most likely have had to land at the White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico, the NASA team's third choice for a landing site.
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FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 27, 1992
After a fast, smart start, "White Sands" implodes like a black hole, sucking all goodwill from the atmosphere of the theater, turning those of us who started to love it into embittered cuckolds.Great setup: Willem Dafoe, a deputy sheriff in New Mexico, comes across the body of a possible suicide in the desert. Besides a bullet in the head and a gun in the hand, the stiff is clutching (with the other hand) a suitcase loaded with $500,000 in small, dirty bills.Everything in the early sequences is absolutely first rate.
NEWS
By Michael Cabbage and Michael Cabbage,ORLANDO SENTINEL | December 22, 2006
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Space shuttle Discovery could return home today to an unusual sort of white Christmas that NASA managers want to avoid. Only once in 114 previous landings has the shuttle touched down at the White Sands Missile Range in southern New Mexico, a blanched desert of gypsum sand so desolate that the first atomic bomb was detonated there. White Sands' Northrup Strip traditionally has been viewed by NASA as a shuttle runway of last resort, available in case circumstances prevented a return to primary landing sites at the Kennedy Space Center or Southern California's Edwards Air Force Base.
FEATURES
By Syd Kearney and Syd Kearney,Houston Chronicle | April 30, 1995
Love it or leave it: This Mexican city seems to elicit just two emotions from North Americans.Cancun's fans know you cannot find more beautiful beaches for the U.S. dollar.Many travelers are comforted, too, in knowing they won't experience language problems. You have to wander far off the tourist paths to find someone here who isn't proficient in English.Cancun enthusiasts also like the familiar names on the resort's hotels and restaurants. Take your pick from Holiday Inn to Hyatt to Denny's.
NEWS
By Michael Cabbage and Michael Cabbage,ORLANDO SENTINEL | December 22, 2006
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Space shuttle Discovery could return home today to an unusual sort of white Christmas that NASA managers want to avoid. Only once in 114 previous landings has the shuttle touched down at the White Sands Missile Range in southern New Mexico, a blanched desert of gypsum sand so desolate that the first atomic bomb was detonated there. White Sands' Northrup Strip traditionally has been viewed by NASA as a shuttle runway of last resort, available in case circumstances prevented a return to primary landing sites at the Kennedy Space Center or Southern California's Edwards Air Force Base.
NEWS
December 23, 1992
Rosel H. HydeFormer FCC chairmanWASHINGTON -- Rosel H. Hyde, a former chairman of the Federal Communications Commission who spent 35 years with the regulatory agency, died Saturday at a nursing home in suburban Maryland after suffering a stroke. He was 92.During his career, Mr. Hyde played a key role in developing communications policy, including the licensing and expansion of radio and television, cable and mobile radio.He also helped develop the fairness doctrine that requires broadcasters to make available time for opposing views and in the 1969 prohibition of cigarette advertising on radio and TV. Mr. Hyde was named an FCC commissioner in 1946 after serving as the agency's general counsel.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,Los Angeles Times | December 23, 2006
Catching a break with the Florida weather yesterday afternoon, the space shuttle Discovery made a perfect sunset landing at Kennedy Space Center. Mission controllers had waved off an earlier landing opportunity because of storms and low clouds, but the weather unexpectedly cleared enough to allow the attempt. Had the weather not cleared at Kennedy, Discovery would most likely have had to land at the White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico, the NASA team's third choice for a landing site.
FEATURES
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 4, 1998
CAPE TOWN, S. Africa -- Internationally shunned during the shameful years of apartheid, this "Mother City" of South Africa is these days becoming an increasingly popular destination for foreign visitors.It's hardly surprising, of course, given its breathtaking setting beneath Table Mountain and the myriad attractions it can offer, from palm-fringed, white-sand beaches to wild nature reserves, from gorgeous vineyards to a dazzling Water Front mall.To show how pent-up was the overseas demand for travel here, in the 12 months after the 1994 election of the country's first majority black government under President Nelson Mandela, tourism to Cape Town jumped a staggering 49 percent.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter | April 23, 1992
"The Player" is an acerbic, satiric look at Hollywood, as put together by Hollywood exile Robert Altman. It follows an ambitious young producer as he tries to navigate his way through some career obstacles, including murder. Rated R."White Sands" features Willem Dafoe as a deputy sheriff in New Mexico who goes undercover to find a murderer. Mickey Rourke plays his nemesis, a heavy-lidded CIA lizard. Rated R."Toto le Heros" is a wondrous Belgian film in which a bitter old man sets out to murder a rival and ends up recovering his own life.
FEATURES
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 4, 1998
CAPE TOWN, S. Africa -- Internationally shunned during the shameful years of apartheid, this "Mother City" of South Africa is these days becoming an increasingly popular destination for foreign visitors.It's hardly surprising, of course, given its breathtaking setting beneath Table Mountain and the myriad attractions it can offer, from palm-fringed, white-sand beaches to wild nature reserves, from gorgeous vineyards to a dazzling Water Front mall.To show how pent-up was the overseas demand for travel here, in the 12 months after the 1994 election of the country's first majority black government under President Nelson Mandela, tourism to Cape Town jumped a staggering 49 percent.
FEATURES
By Syd Kearney and Syd Kearney,Houston Chronicle | April 30, 1995
Love it or leave it: This Mexican city seems to elicit just two emotions from North Americans.Cancun's fans know you cannot find more beautiful beaches for the U.S. dollar.Many travelers are comforted, too, in knowing they won't experience language problems. You have to wander far off the tourist paths to find someone here who isn't proficient in English.Cancun enthusiasts also like the familiar names on the resort's hotels and restaurants. Take your pick from Holiday Inn to Hyatt to Denny's.
NEWS
December 23, 1992
Rosel H. HydeFormer FCC chairmanWASHINGTON -- Rosel H. Hyde, a former chairman of the Federal Communications Commission who spent 35 years with the regulatory agency, died Saturday at a nursing home in suburban Maryland after suffering a stroke. He was 92.During his career, Mr. Hyde played a key role in developing communications policy, including the licensing and expansion of radio and television, cable and mobile radio.He also helped develop the fairness doctrine that requires broadcasters to make available time for opposing views and in the 1969 prohibition of cigarette advertising on radio and TV. Mr. Hyde was named an FCC commissioner in 1946 after serving as the agency's general counsel.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 27, 1992
After a fast, smart start, "White Sands" implodes like a black hole, sucking all goodwill from the atmosphere of the theater, turning those of us who started to love it into embittered cuckolds.Great setup: Willem Dafoe, a deputy sheriff in New Mexico, comes across the body of a possible suicide in the desert. Besides a bullet in the head and a gun in the hand, the stiff is clutching (with the other hand) a suitcase loaded with $500,000 in small, dirty bills.Everything in the early sequences is absolutely first rate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 24, 1992
After a fast, smart start, "White Sands" implodes like a black hole, sucking all goodwill from the atmosphere of the theater, turning those of us who started to love it into embittered cuckolds.Great setup: Willem Dafoe, a deputy sheriff in New Mexico, comes across the body of a possible suicide in the desert. Besides a bullet in the head and a gun in the hand, the stiff is clutching (with the other hand) a suitcase loaded with $500,000 in small, dirty bills.Everything in the early sequences is absolutely first rate.
NEWS
By James Janega and James Janega,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 9, 2005
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - With electrical supplies dwindling on the space shuttle Discovery, NASA officials say they are determined to bring it down safely early today despite unpredictable weather at the primary landing site in Florida. If weather prevents the shuttle from touching down at Kennedy Space Center for a second day, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is considering landing in New Mexico or at the shuttle's primary backup site in California. "We're going to land [today]
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1997
A photo caption in Monday's Maryland section mistakenly reversed the identifications of two Johns Hopkins scientists involved in a rocket launch in New Mexico. Above, Eric Burgh is on the left and rocket controller Jason McPhate is on the right.The Sun regrets the errors.WHITE SANDS, N.M. -- The little rocket ignited like a white flare and leaped into the night sky above the White Sands Missile Range.In seconds, even as its roar was reaching observers miles away, the rocket had vanished from sight.
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