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White Rabbit

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By Polly Paddock and Polly Paddock,Knight-Ridder | February 11, 1996
"White Rabbit," by Kate Phillips. Houghton Mifflin. 212 pages. $21.95If this first novel is any indication, you'll hear a lot more about this gifted young writer. At 28, she has taken an imaginative leap into the mind of an 88-year-old woman and emerged with a deeply affecting meditation on life. The book takes place during one long day, apparently the final day, in the life of Ruth Hubble.The prose is understated, the metaphors are quietly masterful. It's a beautiful book.
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EXPLORE
September 1, 2012
The Carroll Hospital Center Auxiliary will host the sixth annual White Rabbit Fun Day on Saturday, Sept. 8, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the hospital's Dixon Building parking lot, Stoner Avenue, Westminster. The day will feature entertainment, children's activities, food and a flea market. Spaces for craft vendors and flea market available; $25. Call 410-871-7280.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | January 9, 2003
Don't be late for a very important date Sunday at Smith Theatre in Columbia. The National Marionette Theatre presents the classic tale Alice in Wonderland. Detailed marionettes, modeled on the original book illustrations of artist John Tenniel, star as Alice, the White Rabbit, the Mad Hatter, the Caterpillar, the Queen of Hearts, the Cheshire Cat and the other creatures in Wonderland. Watch Alice follow the White Rabbit down the hole and into a magical land, and see her embark on many a curious adventure until her safe return to the meadows.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2012
At rehearsals last weekend, young actors were busy preparing for professional-caliber productions opening next week. Children's Theatre of Annapolis presents Disney's "Alice in Wonderland," featuring a cast ages 8 to 14, on weekends April 13-22 at its Bay Head Road theater in Annapolis. The Annapolis Shakespeare Company will present "Romeo and Juliet," featuring a cast age 18 and under, April 12-14 at Bowie Playhouse in White Marsh Park. The 1951 Disney animated film is based on Lewis Carroll's classics, "The Adventures of Alice in Wonderland" and its sequel, "Through the Looking Glass.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kenneth Turan and Tribune newspapers | March 5, 2010
One pill makes you larger and one pill makes you small, and the pills Tim Burton gives you don't do very much at all. With apologies to the Jefferson Airplane's "White Rabbit," that more or less sums up "Alice in Wonderland," the director's middling new version of the Lewis Carroll tale. It has its successful moments but it's surprisingly inert overall, more like a Burton derivative than something he actually did himself. Through no fault of its own, "Alice" also has the misfortune of being the first major 3-D release to come out after the "Avatar" revolution, and when you add in that Burton chose to shoot in 2D and have the footage converted, it inevitably plays like one of the last gasps of the old-fashioned ways of doing things.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | April 23, 1993
A novel is a novel. A play is a play. And neither automatically becomes a successful version of the other.That's one lesson to be learned from the Moonlight Trouper's presentation of "Alice In Wonderland," which is showing at Anne Arundel Community College's Pascal Center this weekend.Indeed, a great deal of this script adapted for the stage by Eve Le Galliene and Florida Friebus comes directly from Lewis Carroll himself, and therein lies the problem. With no handcrafted dramatic structure to buttress them, the enchanting monologues and conversations of the novel become talky and just plain uneventful when transported to the stage.
NEWS
By KATHERYN G. McGILL | October 9, 1991
The center of the market was dominated by a large red, white and blue canopy. Still seeking the White Rabbit, Alice had left Tweedledum and Tweedledee far behind, up the hill, exhausted in fits of glee after their poem.As she approached the market, she could make out hundreds of people milling around amidst muffled noises. A row of traffic cones stood in front of the canopy, on either side of a large gate. A guardsman, dressed in camouflage, paced back and forth. As Alice approached, he stepped forward.
NEWS
By KATHERYN G. McGILL | October 8, 1991
Alice sprawled lazily amongst the pickerelweed and cordgrass.The leaves of obligate wetland vegetation reached out kiss her fingers. A warm sun bathed the wetland area, and a fickle breeze rippled the stands of spike rushes and cattails.She slipped off her wet loafers and pushed her toes playfully into the cool, water-logged soil. Damselflies coupled and laid eggs on the reed grass. The call of red-winged blackbirds put a halo of music around the quiet solitude. An otter led its kits among the clumps of marsh hibiscus.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | December 26, 2004
Dorothy Smith, a devoted wife and mother who embraced the role of family historian, died Monday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Copper Ridge Institute in Sykesville. The longtime Baltimore resident was 84. Dorothy Williams was born near Evian, France, in Divonne-les-Bains. She was raised by her maternal grandparents, who were direct descendants of King Louis IX of France. Her father, Col. Roger Williams III, a career Army officer, was a descendant of Roger Williams, the founder of Rhode Island.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2012
At rehearsals last weekend, young actors were busy preparing for professional-caliber productions opening next week. Children's Theatre of Annapolis presents Disney's "Alice in Wonderland," featuring a cast ages 8 to 14, on weekends April 13-22 at its Bay Head Road theater in Annapolis. The Annapolis Shakespeare Company will present "Romeo and Juliet," featuring a cast age 18 and under, April 12-14 at Bowie Playhouse in White Marsh Park. The 1951 Disney animated film is based on Lewis Carroll's classics, "The Adventures of Alice in Wonderland" and its sequel, "Through the Looking Glass.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kenneth Turan and Tribune newspapers | March 5, 2010
One pill makes you larger and one pill makes you small, and the pills Tim Burton gives you don't do very much at all. With apologies to the Jefferson Airplane's "White Rabbit," that more or less sums up "Alice in Wonderland," the director's middling new version of the Lewis Carroll tale. It has its successful moments but it's surprisingly inert overall, more like a Burton derivative than something he actually did himself. Through no fault of its own, "Alice" also has the misfortune of being the first major 3-D release to come out after the "Avatar" revolution, and when you add in that Burton chose to shoot in 2D and have the footage converted, it inevitably plays like one of the last gasps of the old-fashioned ways of doing things.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | December 26, 2004
Dorothy Smith, a devoted wife and mother who embraced the role of family historian, died Monday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Copper Ridge Institute in Sykesville. The longtime Baltimore resident was 84. Dorothy Williams was born near Evian, France, in Divonne-les-Bains. She was raised by her maternal grandparents, who were direct descendants of King Louis IX of France. Her father, Col. Roger Williams III, a career Army officer, was a descendant of Roger Williams, the founder of Rhode Island.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | January 9, 2003
Don't be late for a very important date Sunday at Smith Theatre in Columbia. The National Marionette Theatre presents the classic tale Alice in Wonderland. Detailed marionettes, modeled on the original book illustrations of artist John Tenniel, star as Alice, the White Rabbit, the Mad Hatter, the Caterpillar, the Queen of Hearts, the Cheshire Cat and the other creatures in Wonderland. Watch Alice follow the White Rabbit down the hole and into a magical land, and see her embark on many a curious adventure until her safe return to the meadows.
NEWS
By Polly Paddock and Polly Paddock,Knight-Ridder | February 11, 1996
"White Rabbit," by Kate Phillips. Houghton Mifflin. 212 pages. $21.95If this first novel is any indication, you'll hear a lot more about this gifted young writer. At 28, she has taken an imaginative leap into the mind of an 88-year-old woman and emerged with a deeply affecting meditation on life. The book takes place during one long day, apparently the final day, in the life of Ruth Hubble.The prose is understated, the metaphors are quietly masterful. It's a beautiful book.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | April 23, 1993
A novel is a novel. A play is a play. And neither automatically becomes a successful version of the other.That's one lesson to be learned from the Moonlight Trouper's presentation of "Alice In Wonderland," which is showing at Anne Arundel Community College's Pascal Center this weekend.Indeed, a great deal of this script adapted for the stage by Eve Le Galliene and Florida Friebus comes directly from Lewis Carroll himself, and therein lies the problem. With no handcrafted dramatic structure to buttress them, the enchanting monologues and conversations of the novel become talky and just plain uneventful when transported to the stage.
NEWS
By KATHERYN G. McGILL | October 9, 1991
The center of the market was dominated by a large red, white and blue canopy. Still seeking the White Rabbit, Alice had left Tweedledum and Tweedledee far behind, up the hill, exhausted in fits of glee after their poem.As she approached the market, she could make out hundreds of people milling around amidst muffled noises. A row of traffic cones stood in front of the canopy, on either side of a large gate. A guardsman, dressed in camouflage, paced back and forth. As Alice approached, he stepped forward.
EXPLORE
September 1, 2012
The Carroll Hospital Center Auxiliary will host the sixth annual White Rabbit Fun Day on Saturday, Sept. 8, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the hospital's Dixon Building parking lot, Stoner Avenue, Westminster. The day will feature entertainment, children's activities, food and a flea market. Spaces for craft vendors and flea market available; $25. Call 410-871-7280.
NEWS
October 2, 2005
Hospital to launch Parkinson's support Carroll Hospital Center has partnered with the Carroll County Bureau of Aging and the Morris K. Udall Parkinson's Disease Research Center of Excellence at the Johns Hopkins University to create a Parkinson's disease support group. To launch the new group, a one-time-only presentation will be held at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Westminster Senior Activities Center, 125 Stoner Ave. Dr. Joseph Savitt will discuss the latest in Parkinson's research. The group will meet regularly from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. the fourth Tuesday of the month at the Westminster senior center.
NEWS
By KATHERYN G. McGILL | October 8, 1991
Alice sprawled lazily amongst the pickerelweed and cordgrass.The leaves of obligate wetland vegetation reached out kiss her fingers. A warm sun bathed the wetland area, and a fickle breeze rippled the stands of spike rushes and cattails.She slipped off her wet loafers and pushed her toes playfully into the cool, water-logged soil. Damselflies coupled and laid eggs on the reed grass. The call of red-winged blackbirds put a halo of music around the quiet solitude. An otter led its kits among the clumps of marsh hibiscus.
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