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By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2003
FOR HALF a century, "white flight" has dominated demographic change in Baltimore. While the city's population was dropping by nearly a third between 1950 and 2000, the number of whites in Baltimore was declining by more than 70 percent. Even in the decade between 1990 and 2000, when the number of African-Americans living in the city fell for the first time, the net loss of white population outstripped that of blacks, 5 to 1. Now, there is new evidence to suggest that the seemingly relentless decline in the city's white population is leveling off. According to recent census estimates, the number of non-Hispanic whites living in Baltimore between the 2000 Census and July 1, 2002, declined by just more than 5,000 - a drop of about 185 a month.
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By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
The movie "Jaws" was released 39 years ago this month so by now we're certain it's more than safe to go back in the water. Or is it? Over the weekend, a fisherman off the coast of Cape May, N.J., had a semi-pleasant (no one died) encounter with a great white shark that came snooping near the man's 35-foot boat. The 16-foot shark hung around about 20 minutes, according to Steve Clark, the vessel's owner, and didn't leave without getting a taste of a bait bag filled with chum that was hanging from the boat.
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NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2004
Racial and ethnic minorities are fueling growth in the region's suburbs, most notably Baltimore and Howard counties, according to U.S. Census estimates released yesterday. In Baltimore County, as the non-Hispanic white population decreased by 1,285 between 2000 and last year, the number of black residents swelled by 18,175. The county's relatively small Asian and Hispanic communities also added new residents. Combined, the non-white population made up about 28 percent of Baltimore County's residents last year, up from 25 percent in 2000.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel | January 4, 2010
With the first decade of the 21st century having drawn to a close, Baltimore is on the verge of a major demographic development. For the first decade since the city's population decline began some 60 years ago, white flight is not the leading cause of the decrease in the number of residents - black flight is. According to the most recent census estimates, since 2000 the number of non-Hispanic whites in the city has declined by about 7,000,...
NEWS
By James Bock | February 20, 1991
Baltimore's white population declined by almost 60,000 over the past decade while its black population grew only slightly, leaving the city 59.2 percent black in 1990, the U.S. Census Bureau reported yesterday.The figures came as a modest surprise to city planners, who had projected that Baltimore -- which was 54.8 percent black in 1980 -- would top the 60 percent mark this decade.Maryland's black population grew by almost one-quarter over the past decade, spurred by an influx of blacks into the Washington suburbs.
NEWS
August 16, 2006
Because Maryland has so few Hispanics and Asians, relatively speaking, it's noteworthy that a new Census Bureau survey found that their numbers have been increasing here sharply over the past five years. But the real significance in this mid-decade statistical snapshot? It's the story it tells about African-Americans. Half the growth in the state's population since 2000 is because of the increase in the number of black Marylanders. They made a much bigger difference than any other racial or ethnic group.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel | January 4, 2010
With the first decade of the 21st century having drawn to a close, Baltimore is on the verge of a major demographic development. For the first decade since the city's population decline began some 60 years ago, white flight is not the leading cause of the decrease in the number of residents - black flight is. According to the most recent census estimates, since 2000 the number of non-Hispanic whites in the city has declined by about 7,000,...
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | July 15, 1997
THE NAACP is holding its national convention this week in Pittsburgh, with some of its members muttering about giving up the long struggle for school integration. This is an echo of words spoken by many white people all their lives. It only goes to prove, when it comes to matters of race, black people can be just as wrong as whites."A debate has been raging as to whether [school integration] is still the position we should take," NAACP Chairwoman Myrlie Evers-Williams declared three weeks ago.And, though she restated the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People's commitment to integration Sunday night, Evers-Williams' words opened a creaking door through which other voices are now being heard.
NEWS
By R. Alonso-Zaldivar and R. Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 18, 2004
WASHINGTON - The numbers of Hispanics and Asians in the United States will triple over the next half-century as an aging white population slips from its traditional majority perch, according to U.S. Census Bureau projections released today. The estimates through 2050 show that during the current decade, the United States will, for the first time, reach the demographic milestone of more than 100 million minority residents. By 2010, minorities will number more than 110 million out of a total population of 309 million.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Madison Park and Kelly Brewington and Madison Park,SUN REPORTERS | August 9, 2007
For years, minority population increases have transformed Baltimore's inner suburbs. Now, that growth is reaching into such extended areas as Harford County, diversifying a relatively homogeneous jurisdiction. Between 2000 and 2006, Harford County's minority population increased quickly while the rate of growth of its white population slowed, according to data released today by the U.S. Census. The trend is true for the entire Baltimore region, whose growth is being fueled by minorities.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Madison Park and Kelly Brewington and Madison Park,SUN REPORTERS | August 9, 2007
For years, minority population increases have transformed Baltimore's inner suburbs. Now, that growth is reaching into such extended areas as Harford County, diversifying a relatively homogeneous jurisdiction. Between 2000 and 2006, Harford County's minority population increased quickly while the rate of growth of its white population slowed, according to data released today by the U.S. Census. The trend is true for the entire Baltimore region, whose growth is being fueled by minorities.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | May 17, 2007
Minorities constituted more than half of Maryland's preschool population in 2006, according to a state analysis of U.S. census data that show minorities have fueled virtually all of the state's population growth this decade. The data - released today by the U.S. Census Bureau - indicate that Maryland's population is increasing because of immigrants and minority families arriving from other states, as the white population declines slightly. An analysis of the data by the Maryland Department of Planning shows that the diversity is most apparent among young people, with minorities constituting 51 percent of children under age 5. Maryland's figures follow national trends in which one in three U.S. residents is a minority and nearly half of all children under 5 are minorities.
NEWS
August 16, 2006
Because Maryland has so few Hispanics and Asians, relatively speaking, it's noteworthy that a new Census Bureau survey found that their numbers have been increasing here sharply over the past five years. But the real significance in this mid-decade statistical snapshot? It's the story it tells about African-Americans. Half the growth in the state's population since 2000 is because of the increase in the number of black Marylanders. They made a much bigger difference than any other racial or ethnic group.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2005
BALTIMORE HAS long been a Democratic bastion, but just how liberal is the city? Pretty darn liberal, according to a newly released study. Baltimore is the 14th most liberal city in the country, according to the study by the nonpartisan Bay Area Center for Voting Research in Berkeley, Calif. Among major cities -- those with more than 300,000 people -- Baltimore ranked as the sixth most liberal. The study examined 2004 presidential election returns for 237 cities with populations greater than 100,000.
NEWS
By R. Alonso-Zaldivar and R. Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 18, 2004
WASHINGTON - The numbers of Hispanics and Asians in the United States will triple over the next half-century as an aging white population slips from its traditional majority perch, according to U.S. Census Bureau projections released today. The estimates through 2050 show that during the current decade, the United States will, for the first time, reach the demographic milestone of more than 100 million minority residents. By 2010, minorities will number more than 110 million out of a total population of 309 million.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2003
FOR HALF a century, "white flight" has dominated demographic change in Baltimore. While the city's population was dropping by nearly a third between 1950 and 2000, the number of whites in Baltimore was declining by more than 70 percent. Even in the decade between 1990 and 2000, when the number of African-Americans living in the city fell for the first time, the net loss of white population outstripped that of blacks, 5 to 1. Now, there is new evidence to suggest that the seemingly relentless decline in the city's white population is leveling off. According to recent census estimates, the number of non-Hispanic whites living in Baltimore between the 2000 Census and July 1, 2002, declined by just more than 5,000 - a drop of about 185 a month.
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