Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWhite Paper
IN THE NEWS

White Paper

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | September 23, 2001
WASHINGTON - President Bush, under pressure from foreign governments to produce evidence that Osama bin Laden is responsible for the attacks Sept. 11, has directed investigators to prepare a briefing paper outlining the U.S. case, sources familiar with the situation said. The white paper is expected to be made public. It is designed mainly to assure potential allies and the American public that the White House has concrete proof that the exiled Saudi millionaire is directly tied to the attacks, a key to building political support for any retaliation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2013
Works in living black and white provide fascinating experiences at the C. Grimaldis Gallery. Two artists working in different media are highlighted in an exhibit that challenges the way we see familiar images - or what we assume to be familiar images. Dennis Lee Mitchell, receiving his first solo show at Grimaldis, employs smoke to create pieces that exude, simultaneously, remarkable calmness and volatility. The technique involves lighting a blow torch and applying the resulting carbon to paper.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By John Javna | October 20, 1990
American workers throw out the equivalent of more than 1,500 trees -- recyclable letterhead stationery, memos, copier paper, typing paper and computer paper -- every week.We throw out about 85 percent of the office paper we use -- enough to build a 12-foot-high wall of paper from New York to California.Every time we recycle a ton of it, we save the equivalent of 380 gallons of oil and 7,000 gallons of water.What does your office use that can be recycled?*WHITE PAPER* It includes: white computer paper, stationery (letterhead and bond)
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | February 9, 2013
An unsigned and undated Justice Department white paper, obtained by NBC News, reports The New York Times, "... is the most detailed analysis yet to come into public view regarding the Obama legal team's views about the lawfulness of killing, without a trial, an American citizen who executive branch officials decide is an operational leader of Al Qaeda or one of its allies. " The proviso is they must pose "an imminent threat of violent attack against the United States. " If "an informed, high-level official" of the government decides they are a threat, the paper says, and if capture is not feasible, they may be killed.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | February 9, 2013
An unsigned and undated Justice Department white paper, obtained by NBC News, reports The New York Times, "... is the most detailed analysis yet to come into public view regarding the Obama legal team's views about the lawfulness of killing, without a trial, an American citizen who executive branch officials decide is an operational leader of Al Qaeda or one of its allies. " The proviso is they must pose "an imminent threat of violent attack against the United States. " If "an informed, high-level official" of the government decides they are a threat, the paper says, and if capture is not feasible, they may be killed.
NEWS
April 20, 2011
While a senior at Goucher College and employed as one of the first Baltimore Urban Corps interns 41 years ago, I was assigned to work part-time with City Council President William Donald Schaefer. My job was to meet with selected people who had written to Mr. Schaefer, figure out what their concerns were, and report back to him. At the same time, he wanted me to produce a white paper on creating an ombudsman who could fairly adjudicate citizen complaints. It was a fascinating job, especially because Don Schaefer actually spent time with me to discuss what I was finding in my travels through the city.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | November 7, 1990
Someday fish packages could have a microchip embedded in their wrapping. When the fish is correctly cooked in a microwave oven, the chip would turn the oven off. This, futurists predict, will insure perfectly cooked fish.Moreover, it could, I predict, give an entirely new meaning to the phrase "fish and chips."The prospect of having your fish boss around your oven was one of the predictions I came across while reading a white paper on the seafood in the next century. The paper was the distillation of opinions and seafood-in-the-sky prophesies that came out of a gathering of food experts.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 27, 1996
The fifth-grade students at Freedom Elementary feasted like their Pilgrim and Native American forebears yesterday.Their costumes were paper, and the cuisine was heated in crock pots, but the children easily created the conviviality of shared Thanksgiving meals.The celebration began with "The Unthankful Pilgrim," a drama of a settler disheartened by harsh winters and the loss of family."But he became thankful when his friends reminded him of all he had," said Josh Lapps, who played the lead.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | June 25, 1995
Driven by rising worldwide demand, the paper industry is booming. Mills across the country are posting whopping profits as prices have jumped 30 percent to 75 percent, depending on the grade of paper, over the past year.This trend has generated mounting anxiety for companies for which paper represents a high share of their costs, such as newspapers, publishing, paper goods and packaging. Others are seeking to adjust their budgets to cover the higher costs or to reduce their consumption.What's the outlook for paper prices and their impact on $l companies that are heavy users of paper?
NEWS
By Ernest B. Furgurson | January 11, 1991
Washington. IN THE PERSIAN Gulf confrontation, U.S. military officers are enforcing press ''guidelines'' to limit coverage and censor reports more closely than in any modern American war. Their ostensible reason is to protect plans and options when fighting starts.Simultaneously, the chairman of the House Armed Services Committee in Washington issues a 26-page ''white paper'' outlining U.S. military options in substantial detail. If that document were classified rather than published, any potential enemy would pay a spy millions to steal a copy.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | February 9, 2012
Mitt Romney appears to have all the foreign-policy savvy of someone who once visited Euro Disney, and it's freaking me out. Not to say that President Barack Obama is any more knowledgeable on that front, but at least he seems aware of his limitations, outsourcing foreign leadership to the French, the Brits, Hillary Clinton and private contractors. Never has the world been so interconnected, with power and influence becoming decentralized and regionalized. America's problems -- economic or otherwise -- can no longer be solved from inside America, nor can conventional wisdom and the traditional order of things be predictably relied upon.
NEWS
April 20, 2011
While a senior at Goucher College and employed as one of the first Baltimore Urban Corps interns 41 years ago, I was assigned to work part-time with City Council President William Donald Schaefer. My job was to meet with selected people who had written to Mr. Schaefer, figure out what their concerns were, and report back to him. At the same time, he wanted me to produce a white paper on creating an ombudsman who could fairly adjudicate citizen complaints. It was a fascinating job, especially because Don Schaefer actually spent time with me to discuss what I was finding in my travels through the city.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2010
Students from the Children's Guild who sailed the bay and collected litter from the Inner Harbor shoreline throughout this month found a creative outlet for the trash they brought back to their Glen Burnie school: turning it into a sailboat. The 20 children, who are coping with autism and emotional disorders, converted their stinky collection into a work of art Wednesday, sculpting a sailboat from cardboard, soda bottles and Styrofoam. They decorated its hull with cast-off candy wrappers and snack bags and filled its jib with smiling photos of themselves, taken during their four-week summer course, which showed them their role in protecting the environment.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | September 23, 2001
WASHINGTON - President Bush, under pressure from foreign governments to produce evidence that Osama bin Laden is responsible for the attacks Sept. 11, has directed investigators to prepare a briefing paper outlining the U.S. case, sources familiar with the situation said. The white paper is expected to be made public. It is designed mainly to assure potential allies and the American public that the White House has concrete proof that the exiled Saudi millionaire is directly tied to the attacks, a key to building political support for any retaliation.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2001
Whose woods these are you may well know, but perhaps not as Elzbieta Sikorska draws them. These trees standing or fallen, these streamlets, rocks and brush are all part of Washington's suburban scenery, common as sparrows and as apt to draw attention. Sikorska has stopped on her walks in the woods and taken snapshots and returned to her house in Silver Spring and then gone to work - or is it war? It's a battle of a sort, as you may notice from her 10 drawings on view at the Gomez Gallery in Baltimore through March 10. These woods don't whisper gently in the passing day. They crackle as if struck by lightning, the tree trunks and branches jittering like live wires.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | January 12, 1999
THE DAILY LIFE of a young girl is not all boys and beauty tips, gossip and girlfriends, soccer and school clothes, and nobody knows that better than her mom. Since the publication of "Reviving Ophelia," by Mary Pipher in 1994, each day brings us a newspaper headline or a television special chronicling how our happy, energetic and self-confident girls are exploited by popular culture, shortchanged by schools, and set adrift by families until they...
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | February 9, 2012
Mitt Romney appears to have all the foreign-policy savvy of someone who once visited Euro Disney, and it's freaking me out. Not to say that President Barack Obama is any more knowledgeable on that front, but at least he seems aware of his limitations, outsourcing foreign leadership to the French, the Brits, Hillary Clinton and private contractors. Never has the world been so interconnected, with power and influence becoming decentralized and regionalized. America's problems -- economic or otherwise -- can no longer be solved from inside America, nor can conventional wisdom and the traditional order of things be predictably relied upon.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2001
Whose woods these are you may well know, but perhaps not as Elzbieta Sikorska draws them. These trees standing or fallen, these streamlets, rocks and brush are all part of Washington's suburban scenery, common as sparrows and as apt to draw attention. Sikorska has stopped on her walks in the woods and taken snapshots and returned to her house in Silver Spring and then gone to work - or is it war? It's a battle of a sort, as you may notice from her 10 drawings on view at the Gomez Gallery in Baltimore through March 10. These woods don't whisper gently in the passing day. They crackle as if struck by lightning, the tree trunks and branches jittering like live wires.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 3, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Democratic fund-raisers looked upon President Clinton as a cash cow whose presence at campaign-year events would help the party raise $70 million from wealthy donors in 1996, according to documents released yesterday by the White House.The documents are among 1,200 pages of campaign memos and other notes from the files of Harold M. Ickes, a former White House deputy chief of staff. They are the second batch of his papers to be made public.Together, the papers help sketch the most complete portrait to date of a White House racked by election anxiety and preoccupied by the idea that Clinton's re-election depended on a prodigious fund-raising operation.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 27, 1996
The fifth-grade students at Freedom Elementary feasted like their Pilgrim and Native American forebears yesterday.Their costumes were paper, and the cuisine was heated in crock pots, but the children easily created the conviviality of shared Thanksgiving meals.The celebration began with "The Unthankful Pilgrim," a drama of a settler disheartened by harsh winters and the loss of family."But he became thankful when his friends reminded him of all he had," said Josh Lapps, who played the lead.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.