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By Kim Pierce and Kim Pierce,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | February 21, 1996
They stick in our brains: "It's the real thing," "You deserve a break today," "It does a body good."And, of course, "the other white meat."Armed with that slogan, and 31 percent leaner hogs, the National Pork Producers Council has succeeded in getting Americans to rethink pork.Since 1987, "the other white meat" has been the linchpin of a national pork campaign, which a council spokeswoman says has targeted consumers and restaurants.The message has hit home: Pork consumption per capita has risen slightly over that time, as has overall meat consumption.
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NEWS
December 26, 2005
Some of the credit goes to Katrina, the giant storm that all but consumed the federal budget. Maybe more thanks should go to the "Bridge to Nowhere," a project for Alaska so dubious it focused attention for months on the practice of allowing congressional lawmakers to slip goodies for the homefolks into giant spending bills with no questions asked. Whatever the motivation, Congress was shamed into forsaking such individual "earmarks" on this year's $600 billion version of the measure that finances a broad array of health, education and social programs.
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NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | November 25, 2005
In the basement of St. Elizabeth's Catholic Church, about two dozen volunteers wearing name tags, gloves and hairnets did what no one else at the annual Bea Gaddy Thanksgiving dinner wanted to do. Leg by leg, wing by wing, they tore the dark meat off of several hundred turkeys - enough birds to fill two, 26-foot U-Hauls. The cold meat numbed their hands, and after three hours of dividing, ripping and twisting the slippery meat, their fingers had become sore. "This is the heartbeat of the operation," said Dereck Bowden, 47, as he thrust his hands into a 10-gallon pot of stuffing in the adjacent kitchen.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | November 25, 2005
In the basement of St. Elizabeth's Catholic Church, about two dozen volunteers wearing name tags, gloves and hairnets did what no one else at the annual Bea Gaddy Thanksgiving dinner wanted to do. Leg by leg, wing by wing, they tore the dark meat off of several hundred turkeys - enough birds to fill two, 26-foot U-Hauls. The cold meat numbed their hands, and after three hours of dividing, ripping and twisting the slippery meat, their fingers had become sore. "This is the heartbeat of the operation," said Dereck Bowden, 47, as he thrust his hands into a 10-gallon pot of stuffing in the adjacent kitchen.
NEWS
December 26, 2005
Some of the credit goes to Katrina, the giant storm that all but consumed the federal budget. Maybe more thanks should go to the "Bridge to Nowhere," a project for Alaska so dubious it focused attention for months on the practice of allowing congressional lawmakers to slip goodies for the homefolks into giant spending bills with no questions asked. Whatever the motivation, Congress was shamed into forsaking such individual "earmarks" on this year's $600 billion version of the measure that finances a broad array of health, education and social programs.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | February 16, 2000
* Item: Perdue Entrees * What you get: 2 servings * Cost: About $3 * Preparation time: 2 to 3 minutes in microwave, 25 to 30 minutes in conventional oven * Review: Perdue's newest heat-and-serve chicken entrees are heavy on tasty, white-meat chicken. The flavors could use a little fine-tuning, however. The Jambalaya With Chicken, Sausage, Rice and Ham was overpowered by fennel. The Chicken Alfredo With Fettucine was rich and creamy, but with an odd sweetness to it. The portions seem a little off, too. If I split this for 2 servings as the label suggests, I'd definitely have to come up with a salad and another side dish to make a meal.
FEATURES
By Maria Hiaasen | May 7, 1997
Item: Marie Callender's Chicken Pot PieWhat you get: 2 servings (1 pound, 1/2 ounce)Cost: $3.29Time to prepare: 15 minutes in the microwave; 1 hour in conventional oven.Review: I probably hadn't eaten a chicken potpie since college, when I did my cooking in a toaster oven, but Marie Callender's "new microwavable golden flaky crust" intrigued me. The pie comes in a cardboard pan and sits inside its silver-lined box for browning. I was skeptical, but the crust turned out lightly browned and flaky.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | February 26, 1992
Chicken thighs are a penny-pinchers delight. These meaty, moist poultry parts are easy to work with, very flavorful and, best of all, cost anywhere from one-third to one-half the price of skinless, boneless chicken breasts.For example, a local grocery store was selling name-brand boneless, skinless chicken breasts for $2.69 a pound. Thighs, with the skin and bone, were selling at $1.19 a pound. Roughly speaking, plan on losing about one ounce per thigh when the skin and bone are removed.Thighs can be substituted in most white meat recipes but work best in strong sauces, such as tomato or red wine, says Beverly Cox, a home economist for Perdue.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 16, 2004
CHICAGO - McDonald's Corp., the world's largest restaurant chain, said it had fourth-quarter net income of about 10 cents a share, helped by rising U.S. sales in response to new products like white-meat Chicken McNuggets. The earnings include costs of 25 cents a share for the sale of the Donatos Pizzeria chain and closing Boston Market restaurants outside the United States, the company said. McDonald's had a loss of $343.8 million, or 27 cents a share, in the fourth quarter of 2002. Sales in the United States, McDonald's largest market, rose 12 percent last month, the ninth straight monthly gain.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Restaurant Critic | May 14, 1993
Maybe Federal Hill wasn't ready for 30 different kinds of pizza. At least that seems to be the premise behind the opening of the Iola Cafe in the spot where the Al Pacino Cafe used to be.The most noticeable difference between the two, other than the fine lavender neon lightning bolt in the window, is that the new place offers only 16 varieties. (My new rule, by the way, is never to read -- let alone order -- past No. 5 on any pizzeria's menu. The further along you get, the stranger and less appetizing the combinations are. Pineapple and mozzarella (No. 13 at Iola)
FEATURES
By Kim Pierce and Kim Pierce,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | February 21, 1996
They stick in our brains: "It's the real thing," "You deserve a break today," "It does a body good."And, of course, "the other white meat."Armed with that slogan, and 31 percent leaner hogs, the National Pork Producers Council has succeeded in getting Americans to rethink pork.Since 1987, "the other white meat" has been the linchpin of a national pork campaign, which a council spokeswoman says has targeted consumers and restaurants.The message has hit home: Pork consumption per capita has risen slightly over that time, as has overall meat consumption.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | March 5, 2008
Spicy tomato salsa gives these light, juicy chicken burgers a hint of the Southwest. Coleslaw is a perfect side dish. Look for ground chicken made from breast meat only. If it's simply labeled "ground chicken," it contains skin, fat and dark meat. Any type of sweet onion can be used. Be sure to drain the salsa or the hamburgers won't hold their shape. Southwestern Chicken Burgers Makes 2 servings 3/4 pound ground white-meat chicken 1/4 cup no-sugar-added tomato salsa, drained salt and freshly ground pepper olive-oil spray 2 whole-wheat or whole-grain hamburger rolls 1 medium tomato, sliced 2 lettuce leaves Mix chicken, salsa and salt and pepper to taste in a small bowl.
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