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By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 5, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Judiciary Committee lawyers were formally drafting three articles of impeachment yesterday, accusing President Clinton of lying under oath, obstructing justice and, in the most aggressive charge, abusing the power of his office "to thwart the search for truth."As Republican aides decided to present the committee with the broadest possible case against the president, the White House unveiled a new defense strategy, deciding to directly rebut the specific charges as well as broadly attack the investigation and impeachment process.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 19, 2007
WASHINGTON -- At least four top White House lawyers took part in discussions with the CIA from 2003 to 2005 about whether to destroy videotapes showing the secret interrogations of two al-Qaida operatives, according to current and former administration and intelligence officials. The accounts indicate that the involvement of White House officials in the discussions before the destruction of the tapes in November 2005 was more extensive than Bush administration officials have acknowledged.
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NEWS
By Dan Berger | January 20, 1999
Don't White House lawyers understand that the independent counsel and House managers made it crystal clear that defending himself is an impeachable offense?It's a competitive thing. Milosevic can do anything Saddam can do better.Governor Glen is letting the racing moguls know that they bet on the wrong horse.Pub Date: 1/20/99
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,Sun reporter | December 26, 2006
WASHINGTON -- President Bush is bracing for what could be an onslaught of investigations by the new Democratic-led Congress by hiring lawyers to fill key White House posts and preparing to play defense on countless document requests and possible subpoenas. Bush is moving quickly to fill vacancies within his stable of lawyers, though White House officials say there are no plans to drastically expand the legal staff to deal with a flood of oversight. "No, at this point, no," Tony Snow, the White House spokesman, said recently.
NEWS
By JONATHAN WEISMAN and JONATHAN WEISMAN,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 23, 1999
WASHINGTON -- After two weeks of sitting in silent witness in President Clinton's impeachment trial, senators yesterday began lobbing pointed, strategic questions at House and White House lawyers, pushing the proceedings into deepening partisan rancor.Proceedings broke down along party lines, as Republicans and Democrats tried to help their respective sides make the case for or against the removal of the president."The questions and answers this afternoon did nothing to provide any new or significant information," said Louisiana Democratic Sen. John B. Breaux after the session.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 16, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Complaining about "a rather dismal record of delay," the Senate committee investigating campaign finance abuses has demanded that the White House turn over 70 additional videotapes of President Clinton and Vice President Al Gore attending fund-raising events at the White House and around the country.Since Oct. 29, the committee, led by Sen. Fred Thompson, a Tennessee Republican, has sought the videotapes, including tapes of two White House coffees that the committee's lawyers said they learned about only this week.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | May 14, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The controversy over notes taken by White House lawyers advising Hillary Rodham Clinton has raised a serious and complex legal question that has now been put before the Supreme Court. But questions about the motives of the two parties in the case -- President Clinton and special prosecutor Kenneth Starr -- make it something less than an ideal vehicle for a legal test.The issue has developed out of Mr. Starr's demand for notes made by two White House lawyers about conversations with Hillary Clinton on two occasions -- when she was questioned by the prosecutor in the Whitewater case in July of 1995 and when she appeared before a federal grand jury in January of 1996.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 5, 1998
WASHINGTON -- One of President Clinton's White House lawyers, Lanny Breuer, appeared before the Monica Lewinsky grand jury yesterday, after Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist rejected a White House plea to protect staff attorneys from having to testify about their talks with Clinton.But Breuer's appearance sparked another skirmish. After he had testified for several hours, Breuer, prosecutors and White House lawyers met privately with U.S. District Judge Norma Holloway Johnson in what appeared to be another battle over the White House's claim of attorney-client privilege.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 31, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, following the lead of the White House, has decided not to apply the new Civil Rights Act to thousands of pending lawsuits involving alleged employment discrimination.The decision means that government lawyers will not seek damages on behalf of women, blacks and other minorities who say they were victims of job bias.Under earlier federal civil-rights laws, job discrimination was illegal, but victims could not generally win damages.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Jonathan Weisman and Karen Hosler and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 6, 1999
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's impeachment trial will formally open in the Senate tomorrow, and though details on its timing and format are uncertain, White House lawyers are preparing a vigorous defense.The opening of the trial promises to be a momentous piece of political theater. William H. Rehnquist, the chief justice of the United States, will be sworn in to preside over the first presidential impeachment trial since that of Andrew Johnson in 1868. Rehnquist will, in turn, swear in the 100 senators as jurors.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 4, 2003
WASHINGTON - Bush administration lawyers said yesterday that a judge's decision to throw out most of the case against Zacarias Moussaoui, a confessed al-Qaida member, might undermine efforts to prosecute terrorists in civilian courts and increase the pressure on the government to move terrorism suspects to military tribunals. The concern was clear at the Justice Department, which was unwilling yesterday to say how - or even whether - it would proceed with the case against Moussaoui, the only person charged in an American court with conspiring in the terror attacks of Sept.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 2, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Monica Lewinsky was questioned by House prosecutors for about four hours yesterday about President Clinton's alleged efforts to keep her from testifying about their affair, but the deposition ended early because Clinton's lawyers chose not to use their allotted time.Instead of asking Lewinsky any questions, one of the president's lawyers, Nicole Seligman, read her an apology on behalf of the president for the ordeal she has been through since civil and criminal investigations of her affair with Clinton began more than a year ago, according to sources familiar with the proceeding.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 2, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The pictures on the walls of the presidential suite at the Renaissance Mayflower Hotel tell the story of the capital -- archival renderings of the Capitol dome, yellowed maps of district streets and vintage photographs of Washington. But the discussions taking place there yesterday told a far less stately chapter in that history.Monica Lewinsky sat in that penthouse suite for about six hours starting at 9: 03 a.m., as House prosecutors sought new details stemming from her relationship with President Clinton.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 27, 1999
WASHINGTON -- With the calling of trial witnesses increasingly likely, House prosecutors pleaded yesterday with the Senate to question what one of them called just a "pitiful three" witnesses to help prove their case that President Clinton should be removed from office.The prosecution's pared-down list included Monica Lewinsky, Clinton confidant Vernon Jordan and senior White House aide Sidney Blumenthal, as well as a last-ditch invitation to the president to testify at his own impeachment trial.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 24, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The president's lawyers and House Republican prosecutors squared off yesterday for the second question-and-answer day of the Senate impeachment trial, fielding pointed queries from senators intent on scoring partisan points.Senators will convene tomorrow to hear House and White House legal adversaries debate a Democratic motion to dismiss the trial and a Republican motion to depose witnesses.For nearly six hours yesterday, senators lobbed softball questions to the lawyers of their own party and bombshells at the opposition.
NEWS
By JONATHAN WEISMAN and JONATHAN WEISMAN,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 23, 1999
WASHINGTON -- After two weeks of sitting in silent witness in President Clinton's impeachment trial, senators yesterday began lobbing pointed, strategic questions at House and White House lawyers, pushing the proceedings into deepening partisan rancor.Proceedings broke down along party lines, as Republicans and Democrats tried to help their respective sides make the case for or against the removal of the president."The questions and answers this afternoon did nothing to provide any new or significant information," said Louisiana Democratic Sen. John B. Breaux after the session.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 6, 1998
WASHINGTON -- White House lawyers will likely get more than one day this week to present a defense of the president, but Judiciary Committee Republicans demanded yesterday that the White House drop its abstract constitutional arguments and attacks on the prosecutor -- and instead present a factual defense of the charges against the president.Committee Chairman Henry J. Hyde tried to meet the White House's Friday night request for three to four days to mount its defense while keeping the inquiry from spilling into next year, when Republicans will hold a narrower House majority and political pressure will demand an end to the impeachment inquiry.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 24, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The president's lawyers and House Republican prosecutors squared off yesterday for the second question-and-answer day of the Senate impeachment trial, fielding pointed queries from senators intent on scoring partisan points.Senators will convene tomorrow to hear House and White House legal adversaries debate a Democratic motion to dismiss the trial and a Republican motion to depose witnesses.For nearly six hours yesterday, senators lobbed softball questions to the lawyers of their own party and bombshells at the opposition.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | January 20, 1999
Don't White House lawyers understand that the independent counsel and House managers made it crystal clear that defending himself is an impeachable offense?It's a competitive thing. Milosevic can do anything Saddam can do better.Governor Glen is letting the racing moguls know that they bet on the wrong horse.Pub Date: 1/20/99
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 16, 1999
WASHINGTON -- A parade of House prosecutors staged a four-hour tutorial yesterday on the laws of perjury and obstruction of justice, hoping to persuade 100 silent senators that the offenses committed by President Clinton were grave enough to merit his removal from office.In a sometimes repetitive proceeding, four House Republicans insisted that the evidence against the president overwhelmingly proves the two articles of impeachment approved by the House in December.The prosecutors went on to argue that the evidence is so weighty that it shows Clinton guilty also of some charges the House did not approve or even consider, such as witness tampering or perjury in his deposition in the Paula Corbin Jones lawsuit.
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