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White House Chef

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NEWS
March 2, 2004
Joe Stinchcomb, a 2000 graduate of Long Reach High School, has been selected to be one of about 20 chefs for the White House. He expects to work there at least three years. Stinchcomb, 22, was a Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Technology student in the magnet program at Long Reach, where he learned restaurant management, culinary arts and "hotel front" skills, said his former teacher, Elaine Heilman. "He approached everything with an eager desire to learn and to better himself," she said.
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FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2005
Perhaps it was the delicacy of her chilled asparagus soup, or the way she paired the halibut with a dish of basmati rice, pistachio nuts and currants. Whatever it was, when assistant White House chef Cristeta Comerford triumphed with her White House dinner for Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh last month, she also aced the final test in the competition to be the country's next first chef. Her appointment was officially announced Sunday, making her the first woman to hold the position.
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NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Mary Corey and Rob Kasper and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writers | March 12, 1994
As the First Family searches for a new chef, the question of what's cooking in the White House has taken on political as well as culinary implications.Roughly a year after an elite corps of American chefs began lobbying the president to hire an American chef and serve healthy, environmentally conscious meals, the Clintons are replacing the decades-long tradition of rich French food with the home-grown variety, minus the fat.The decision has rankled some socialites and diplomats in Washington who already believe the Clinton's down-home style of entertaining isn't appropriate in the protocol-filled nation's capital.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2005
Walter Scheib III can easily imagine an ideal menu for tonight's White House dinner for Manmohan Singh, the prime minister of India. After all, he prepared the last one. It was September 2000, in the waning days of the Clinton administration. The former White House chef remembers feeding roughly 800 guests smoked chicken cooked with Darjeeling tea, chilled pea soup made with cilantro chutney, chilies and mint, and wild Copper River salmon from Alaska. Now, while the search continues for his successor -- first lady Laura Bush dismissed Scheib in February -- his former assistant chefs, Chris Comerford and John Moeller, are preparing the first official feast since his departure.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2005
Perhaps it was the delicacy of her chilled asparagus soup, or the way she paired the halibut with a dish of basmati rice, pistachio nuts and currants. Whatever it was, when assistant White House chef Cristeta Comerford triumphed with her White House dinner for Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh last month, she also aced the final test in the competition to be the country's next first chef. Her appointment was officially announced Sunday, making her the first woman to hold the position.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2005
Walter Scheib III can easily imagine an ideal menu for tonight's White House dinner for Manmohan Singh, the prime minister of India. After all, he prepared the last one. It was September 2000, in the waning days of the Clinton administration. The former White House chef remembers feeding roughly 800 guests smoked chicken cooked with Darjeeling tea, chilled pea soup made with cilantro chutney, chilies and mint, and wild Copper River salmon from Alaska. Now, while the search continues for his successor -- first lady Laura Bush dismissed Scheib in February -- his former assistant chefs, Chris Comerford and John Moeller, are preparing the first official feast since his departure.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,Sun Staff Writer | March 31, 1994
He is not well-known but he has a light touch with American food.That, in a nutshell, is the reaction of the food world to the news that Walter S. Scheib III, executive chef at The Greenbrier, a resort in White Sulphur Springs, W.Va., will be the new White House chef.Yesterday a spokesman for first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton said the White House job had been offered to Mr. Scheib but added the appointment probably would not become official for about a week, after routine security checks are completed.
NEWS
By Ross K. Baker | April 7, 1994
AGAIN the Oval Office is displaying the high-handedness characteristic of President Clinton.Tuesday, Walter S. Scheib 3rd, who prepared a "light menu," was publicly anointed White House chef.Why wasn't the $60,000 job removed from Civil Service, and the nomination submitted first to the Senate -- more appropriately, its Agriculture Committee? Cabinet nominees are subject to confirmation. Why not the No. 1 man in the kitchen cabinet?Serious questions about Mr. Scheib, currently the chef at the Greenbrier Resort and Health Spa at White Sulphur Springs, W.Va.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | August 18, 1996
A WHITE HOUSE handshake with President Clinton, dinner at the Mayflower Hotel, a tour of San Francisco and several California wineries, and brunch at Baltimore's Harbor Court Hotel filled a five-day tour by members of the Club of Chefs to the Heads of State. Membership in this exclusive group, formed in 1977, is open to chefs who work for, or have worked for, kings, queens, sultans and presidents.The group's annual meetings are quite fancy compared to the first get-together dinners. Now they meet every summer in a different country, and this year, the host was White House chef Walter Scheib.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 4, 1994
New York -- For years the James Beard Awards have been dubbed the Oscars of the food world. Monday night the food show did a pretty good job of imitating the movie awards. The winners basked in the hot, white lights of television. The presenters read bad jokes from TelePrompTers. And the line of award winners trooping to the stage seemed endless. The winners weren't as well-known or as beautiful as movie stars. But the food was better. The ceremony ran from 4 p.m. to 11 p.m with a three-hour break in the middle for -- what else?
NEWS
March 2, 2004
Joe Stinchcomb, a 2000 graduate of Long Reach High School, has been selected to be one of about 20 chefs for the White House. He expects to work there at least three years. Stinchcomb, 22, was a Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Technology student in the magnet program at Long Reach, where he learned restaurant management, culinary arts and "hotel front" skills, said his former teacher, Elaine Heilman. "He approached everything with an eager desire to learn and to better himself," she said.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | August 18, 1996
A WHITE HOUSE handshake with President Clinton, dinner at the Mayflower Hotel, a tour of San Francisco and several California wineries, and brunch at Baltimore's Harbor Court Hotel filled a five-day tour by members of the Club of Chefs to the Heads of State. Membership in this exclusive group, formed in 1977, is open to chefs who work for, or have worked for, kings, queens, sultans and presidents.The group's annual meetings are quite fancy compared to the first get-together dinners. Now they meet every summer in a different country, and this year, the host was White House chef Walter Scheib.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 4, 1994
New York -- For years the James Beard Awards have been dubbed the Oscars of the food world. Monday night the food show did a pretty good job of imitating the movie awards. The winners basked in the hot, white lights of television. The presenters read bad jokes from TelePrompTers. And the line of award winners trooping to the stage seemed endless. The winners weren't as well-known or as beautiful as movie stars. But the food was better. The ceremony ran from 4 p.m. to 11 p.m with a three-hour break in the middle for -- what else?
NEWS
By Ross K. Baker | April 7, 1994
AGAIN the Oval Office is displaying the high-handedness characteristic of President Clinton.Tuesday, Walter S. Scheib 3rd, who prepared a "light menu," was publicly anointed White House chef.Why wasn't the $60,000 job removed from Civil Service, and the nomination submitted first to the Senate -- more appropriately, its Agriculture Committee? Cabinet nominees are subject to confirmation. Why not the No. 1 man in the kitchen cabinet?Serious questions about Mr. Scheib, currently the chef at the Greenbrier Resort and Health Spa at White Sulphur Springs, W.Va.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,Sun Staff Writer | March 31, 1994
He is not well-known but he has a light touch with American food.That, in a nutshell, is the reaction of the food world to the news that Walter S. Scheib III, executive chef at The Greenbrier, a resort in White Sulphur Springs, W.Va., will be the new White House chef.Yesterday a spokesman for first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton said the White House job had been offered to Mr. Scheib but added the appointment probably would not become official for about a week, after routine security checks are completed.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Mary Corey and Rob Kasper and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writers | March 12, 1994
As the First Family searches for a new chef, the question of what's cooking in the White House has taken on political as well as culinary implications.Roughly a year after an elite corps of American chefs began lobbying the president to hire an American chef and serve healthy, environmentally conscious meals, the Clintons are replacing the decades-long tradition of rich French food with the home-grown variety, minus the fat.The decision has rankled some socialites and diplomats in Washington who already believe the Clinton's down-home style of entertaining isn't appropriate in the protocol-filled nation's capital.
FEATURES
By Orange County Register | October 28, 1992
Cottage cheese doused with ketchup.Sound like a luncheon dish fit for a president of the United States?Not according to Henry Haller, the White House executive chef in 1966-1987."
NEWS
June 15, 1994
So Walter Scheib, the new White House chef, who is said to be interested in promoting the freshest ingredients raised as close to the kitchen as possible, serves his first state dinner, for the emperor and empress of Japan, and there, 45 minutes from the Chesapeake Bay, he serves shellfish (lobster and scallops) from New England and finfish (char) from Iceland?
FEATURES
By Orange County Register | October 28, 1992
Cottage cheese doused with ketchup.Sound like a luncheon dish fit for a president of the United States?Not according to Henry Haller, the White House executive chef in 1966-1987."
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