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White Flight

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NEWS
December 22, 2011
I wouldn't wax rhapsodic about the half centennial of the Jones Falls Expressway ("City's six-lane Main Street at 50," Dec. 16). It was the evacuation route for white flight at a time when the strictures of Jim Crow were in retreat under the Warren Court. How else to explain that the planned "transit line" down the center of the road was never built? Coupled with the dismantling of commuter rail and streetcars around the same time, the JFX could guarantee in and out privileges to white suburbanites but left urban blacks without cars with no way out. The irony is that the JFX half centennial observations are coming at a time when The Sun gets floridly paranoid letters deriding PlanMaryland as a socialist plot engendered by Saul Alinsky (who has been dead for almost 40 years)
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NEWS
October 15, 2013
It is sad to hear that a local business, Santoni's Supermarket, will be closing after more than eight decades serving the people of southeast Baltimore ("Highlandtown Santoni's folds," Oct. 14). Not only are 80 people going to be out of jobs, but now another Baltimore neighborhood faces life in a food desert, all too common of a problem in our city. Santoni's has been in business since the tail end of the Great Depression, stayed in business through food rationing of World War II, though white flight of the '60's and '70's, and countless recessions, including the Great Recession of which some of the effects can still be felt.
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EXPLORE
September 19, 2013
I am writing to express my utter dismay at the redistricting plan to move half of the Clemens Crossing feed out of Wilde Lake Middle School, despite plans for a building expansion the following year. Wilde Lake Middle School is fed by two Title I schools and one non-Title I school, yet the plan is to remove high-income students! Although moving low-income students to high-income schools is known to be enormously beneficial to those students, that is the last thing that the Howard County Public School System would ever consider doing.
EXPLORE
September 19, 2013
I am writing to express my utter dismay at the redistricting plan to move half of the Clemens Crossing feed out of Wilde Lake Middle School, despite plans for a building expansion the following year. Wilde Lake Middle School is fed by two Title I schools and one non-Title I school, yet the plan is to remove high-income students! Although moving low-income students to high-income schools is known to be enormously beneficial to those students, that is the last thing that the Howard County Public School System would ever consider doing.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | December 8, 2005
"The New White Flight" was the title of an eye-opening article in a recent issue of The Wall Street Journal. It was about a high school in Cupertino, Calif., where a growing Asian-American student population is causing academic standards to rise - and causing many white parents to withdraw their children from the school and some to move out of the community. The school has some of the highest test scores in the state. But although everybody is in favor of high academic standards in the abstract, not everyone is in favor of having to struggle to meet those standards.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1995
Kings Contrivance village residents told Columbia Association President Padraic Kennedy last night that they're concerned about a perception of so-called "white flight" from Columbia and crime that is keeping shoppers away from several of the new town's village centers, particularly at night.They also expressed confusion over how to address concerns in community in which several public and private institutions -- village boards, the Columbia Association, the Rouse Co. and county government -- all wield influence.
BUSINESS
By Lauren Harner and Lauren Harner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 23, 2004
The building designs in Windsor Hills display everything from Victorian-style housing to modern apartment buildings to Japanese-inspired homes. The architectural variety is just a small part of the neighborhood's identity in West Baltimore. Residents praise Windsor Hills' diversity. Tanya Hicks, a resident of Windsor Hills for 35 years, said her now-grown son enjoyed knowing all kinds of people in his neighborhood. "He had all different kinds of friends: poor friends, rich friends," Hicks said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 19, 1997
MOUND HOUSE, Nev. -- Four years ago, Richard and Sherrie Glover decided they had had enough of life in Upland, a suburb of Los Angeles. They were fed up with the traffic, fed up with the smog, and frightened by what they believed was increased activity by Hispanic gangs."
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2003
FOR HALF a century, "white flight" has dominated demographic change in Baltimore. While the city's population was dropping by nearly a third between 1950 and 2000, the number of whites in Baltimore was declining by more than 70 percent. Even in the decade between 1990 and 2000, when the number of African-Americans living in the city fell for the first time, the net loss of white population outstripped that of blacks, 5 to 1. Now, there is new evidence to suggest that the seemingly relentless decline in the city's white population is leveling off. According to recent census estimates, the number of non-Hispanic whites living in Baltimore between the 2000 Census and July 1, 2002, declined by just more than 5,000 - a drop of about 185 a month.
NEWS
October 31, 1995
JUST WHAT is happening to Columbia, the planned city that James Rouse created a quarter-century ago to foster a more inclusive suburbia?Recent reports have a citizens group calling on the Columbia Association to take steps to stimulate better relations between affluent and poor residents of the city. Meanwhile, a resident of one village expressed concern at a recent public meeting about "white flight" from some neighborhoods. As if to add to the confusion, a new book just hit the bookstores that celebrates Columbia's legacy of racial and economic harmony.
NEWS
December 22, 2011
I wouldn't wax rhapsodic about the half centennial of the Jones Falls Expressway ("City's six-lane Main Street at 50," Dec. 16). It was the evacuation route for white flight at a time when the strictures of Jim Crow were in retreat under the Warren Court. How else to explain that the planned "transit line" down the center of the road was never built? Coupled with the dismantling of commuter rail and streetcars around the same time, the JFX could guarantee in and out privileges to white suburbanites but left urban blacks without cars with no way out. The irony is that the JFX half centennial observations are coming at a time when The Sun gets floridly paranoid letters deriding PlanMaryland as a socialist plot engendered by Saul Alinsky (who has been dead for almost 40 years)
NEWS
By John Fritze and Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2011
Stanley Zerden remembers a time in the 1970s when Oldtown held promise. Largely burned out by the 1968 riots, the area became a focus for then-Mayor William Donald Schaefer, who closed blocks of Gay Street to cars and created a revolutionary concept for the time — an inner-city pedestrian mall where people could stroll and shop. It almost worked. "It was very successful, and it was Schaefer's baby," the 62-year-old Zerden, a third-generation property owner in Oldtown, said of the now hollowed-out neighborhood east of the city's prison complex.
NEWS
By Dennis D. Parker and Susan Goering | December 26, 2008
Barack Obama's election to this country's highest office powerfully shattered a centuries-old racial glass ceiling. But we must not be tricked into thinking that this inspiring milestone means we have dismantled all structures of racial discrimination in America, or that we can take a breather from the tireless fight for racial justice. Fighting against individual acts of intentional discrimination is important, but the real cause of persistent segregation is institutional discrimination.
NEWS
By Erin Aubry Kaplan and Erin Aubry Kaplan,Los Angeles Times | January 12, 2007
I recently turned 45, and for the first time in my life, my age came as a bit of a shock. Not because of the number (well, maybe a little bit) but because I've started looking backward at my footprints and realizing there aren't enough. I know it's a bit premature, but I'm searching for a semblance of my place in history and am coming up empty. I don't think that will change, especially as history rushes to fill in the blanks made by moments and eras that seem to be coming at us faster and faster - 9/11, the war in Iraq, climate change.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | December 8, 2005
"The New White Flight" was the title of an eye-opening article in a recent issue of The Wall Street Journal. It was about a high school in Cupertino, Calif., where a growing Asian-American student population is causing academic standards to rise - and causing many white parents to withdraw their children from the school and some to move out of the community. The school has some of the highest test scores in the state. But although everybody is in favor of high academic standards in the abstract, not everyone is in favor of having to struggle to meet those standards.
BUSINESS
By Lauren Harner and Lauren Harner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 23, 2004
The building designs in Windsor Hills display everything from Victorian-style housing to modern apartment buildings to Japanese-inspired homes. The architectural variety is just a small part of the neighborhood's identity in West Baltimore. Residents praise Windsor Hills' diversity. Tanya Hicks, a resident of Windsor Hills for 35 years, said her now-grown son enjoyed knowing all kinds of people in his neighborhood. "He had all different kinds of friends: poor friends, rich friends," Hicks said.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | April 7, 1992
In 1968, after civil disorders exploded across the nation, the Kerner Commission deplored the fact that the United States really was ''two nations, one black one white -- separate and unequal.'' Last week a unanimous Supreme Court told us that it is probably going to stay that way.The high tribunal said that where segregated, one-race schools are returning because of ''white flight'' or ''voluntary'' housing patterns, the federal courts have no duty or power to prevent ''resegregation.''''Where resegregation is a product not of state action but of private choices, it does not have constitutional implications,'' said Justice Anthony M. Kennedy.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | March 18, 2004
WASHINGTON - America's public schools, as you may have noticed, remain largely divided by race in spite of the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark Brown vs. Board of Education decision. As the 50th anniversary of that decision approaches on May 17, it is fashionable for some civil rights reformers to declare that Brown has not lived up to its promise. But look at the story behind the numbers and you might notice something more complex and perplexing: Racial segregation persists in public schools not so much in spite of Brown as because of it. Today's segregation is very different from that of the early 1950s.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2003
FOR HALF a century, "white flight" has dominated demographic change in Baltimore. While the city's population was dropping by nearly a third between 1950 and 2000, the number of whites in Baltimore was declining by more than 70 percent. Even in the decade between 1990 and 2000, when the number of African-Americans living in the city fell for the first time, the net loss of white population outstripped that of blacks, 5 to 1. Now, there is new evidence to suggest that the seemingly relentless decline in the city's white population is leveling off. According to recent census estimates, the number of non-Hispanic whites living in Baltimore between the 2000 Census and July 1, 2002, declined by just more than 5,000 - a drop of about 185 a month.
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