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White Elephant

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NEWS
November 18, 2010
Its gestation period has been much longer than for the average pachyderm, Towson Circle lll will nonetheless become one of the largest white elephants in Baltimore County's history ( "Not coming soon: a new movie complex in Towson," Nov. 14). They are going to build a parking garage practically next to another parking garage no one uses at night now and across the street from a free parking lot for a cost of at least $12 million. The revenue it may generate will not be enough to pay for the annual maintenance and staffing costs, so one can forget about ever recouping the taxpayers' money.
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NEWS
July 5, 2013
The proposal offered by letter writer Steve English to tear down the Baltimore Hilton has to be the dumbest idea going ("Orioles fans can finance Hilton tear-down," July 2). I am an Orioles fan and don't care about the view of the skyline at Camden Yards. Steve, do you go to the game to look at the skyline or watch the game? I watch the game. Others can go sit on Federal Hill and look at the skyline and save money on Orioles tickets. Why should we contribute to tearing down Gov. Martin O'Malley's white elephant that should not have been built to begin with?
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NEWS
August 8, 1994
With the opening of the city's Columbus Center just five months away, it is appropriate that redevelopment efforts now center on two vacant buildings nearby, the Pier 4 Power Plant and the Fishmarket. Both bombed in their initial incarnations as entertainment centers and have been begging for new users ever since.Two years ago, the cavernous Power Plant was offered to a group of investors who wanted to re-open it as a $32.5 million virtual reality entertainment complex called Sports Center USA. They have been having trouble securing financing, however.
EXPLORE
June 2, 2011
Yard-sailing. It sounds so … nautical. Everyone likes a good yard sale. I was just speaking with a neighbor about "one man's junk being another man's treasure. " The Reservoir High School football program, in association with various members of the local community, are sponsoring a community-wide yard sale at the high school June 25 from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. Your spot in the sale — a parking space — will set you back $15, $20 for two spaces or $30 for three. I think you see the pattern.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 5, 1994
Three years ago, I presented a good idea (if I do say s myself) for the Power Plant, and none of the so-called tourism experts listened to me. Now, who knows? Maybe the PP will become office space for Alex. Brown. Maybe it won't. Too bad the chowderheads didn't listen to me. My concept could have become reality a year ago. We could have rolled this baby out and filled the place with paying customers. Instead, what do we have? A white elephant.Which gets me to my proposal.I say call the Power Plant what it is: The White Elephant.
NEWS
February 20, 1996
THE DECISION by the Carroll County commissioners not to purchase the Westminster fire hall should be seen as a temporary setback but not a defeat of efforts to recycle the structure. As the most architecturally striking building on Main Street in the county seat, it is far from being a white elephant. In the right hands, in fact, the edifice could be the focal point of revitalization for Westminster's commercial district.Obviously, the Westminster Fire Company is interested in selling the building.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2002
Warning that the Baltimore Convention Center risks becoming a "white elephant," hospitality industry leaders and a key legislator say the agency charged with bringing conventions and trade shows to the city should be examined and brought under the same umbrella as the Convention Center itself. There is sharp disagreement, however, over whether the Convention Center should be expanded again and whether the city needs a headquarters hotel adjacent or nearby. "If we're not attracting conventions, we ought to find out why," said Mary Jo McCulloch, president of the Maryland Hotel and Lodging Association and the Maryland Tourism Council.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 22, 1992
No disrespect to any of the people who put together proposals for the Power Plant, Baltimore's premier white elephant, but I hope the Baltimore Development Corp. rejects all the ideas and asks for more.So far, the only proposal that sounds promising is the one for a catering hall. Wedding and bar mitzvah receptions on Pier 4 at the Inner Harbor could be alluring and marketable. The problem, however, is that it would not make the Power Plant a "public facility," in the way a mall, museum or entertainment center would.
EXPLORE
June 2, 2011
Yard-sailing. It sounds so … nautical. Everyone likes a good yard sale. I was just speaking with a neighbor about "one man's junk being another man's treasure. " The Reservoir High School football program, in association with various members of the local community, are sponsoring a community-wide yard sale at the high school June 25 from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. Your spot in the sale — a parking space — will set you back $15, $20 for two spaces or $30 for three. I think you see the pattern.
NEWS
July 5, 2013
The proposal offered by letter writer Steve English to tear down the Baltimore Hilton has to be the dumbest idea going ("Orioles fans can finance Hilton tear-down," July 2). I am an Orioles fan and don't care about the view of the skyline at Camden Yards. Steve, do you go to the game to look at the skyline or watch the game? I watch the game. Others can go sit on Federal Hill and look at the skyline and save money on Orioles tickets. Why should we contribute to tearing down Gov. Martin O'Malley's white elephant that should not have been built to begin with?
NEWS
November 18, 2010
Its gestation period has been much longer than for the average pachyderm, Towson Circle lll will nonetheless become one of the largest white elephants in Baltimore County's history ( "Not coming soon: a new movie complex in Towson," Nov. 14). They are going to build a parking garage practically next to another parking garage no one uses at night now and across the street from a free parking lot for a cost of at least $12 million. The revenue it may generate will not be enough to pay for the annual maintenance and staffing costs, so one can forget about ever recouping the taxpayers' money.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 7, 2004
It seems a pity that Maryland has apparently lost its chance to build a one-man museum for the seminal abstract-expressionist painter Clyfford Still. But the city of Denver, which successfully wooed Still's widow for the artist's legacy, may have unwittingly bitten off more than it can chew. Last month, Denver's mayor, John Hickenlooper, announced that his city had reached an agreement with Still's estate to build a museum that would house more than 2,000 of the painter's artworks that have been stored in rural Maryland since the artist's death in 1980.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2002
Warning that the Baltimore Convention Center risks becoming a "white elephant," hospitality industry leaders and a key legislator say the agency charged with bringing conventions and trade shows to the city should be examined and brought under the same umbrella as the Convention Center itself. There is sharp disagreement, however, over whether the Convention Center should be expanded again and whether the city needs a headquarters hotel adjacent or nearby. "If we're not attracting conventions, we ought to find out why," said Mary Jo McCulloch, president of the Maryland Hotel and Lodging Association and the Maryland Tourism Council.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | April 25, 1997
White Elephant. Scary thing that. The phrase popped up in a Sun story yesterday about Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's decision to support public subsidy of John Paterakis' hotel east of the Inner Harbor, nearly a mile from the Baltimore Convention Center. Lauren Kramer-Whelan, a meeting planner for the Society of Nuclear Medicine, said the organization canceled its plan to bring 7,000 delegates here in 2000 because the city lacks a major hotel within walking distance of the convention center."The cancellation," she said, "is proof that the Baltimore Convention Center expansion is a $151 million white elephant without the right hotel to support it."
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 14, 1996
CHEAP AND cultural date alert! For those who wonder if there is life outside a video store, the answer is yes.It is possible to have fun and be cultured without watching aproduction of the British Broadcasting Corporation.Tonight, the Montpelier Cultural Arts Center sponsors a free reception to honor the seven artists selected for the center's 17th annual Invitational Sculpture Exhibition.Hobnob with the culturally enhanced while viewing works by members of the Washington Sculptors Group.
NEWS
February 20, 1996
THE DECISION by the Carroll County commissioners not to purchase the Westminster fire hall should be seen as a temporary setback but not a defeat of efforts to recycle the structure. As the most architecturally striking building on Main Street in the county seat, it is far from being a white elephant. In the right hands, in fact, the edifice could be the focal point of revitalization for Westminster's commercial district.Obviously, the Westminster Fire Company is interested in selling the building.
NEWS
January 10, 1994
This much has been clear since Annapolis began talking about building a conference center: It ought to go in the city, as near the historic downtown as possible. Convention visitors who choose Annapolis are going to expect to experience cobblestone streets, the City Dock and 18th-century & 2/3 architecture.Of the three sites being considered, only one comes close to offering visitors that experience, the so-called Menke property at Taylor Avenue and West Street. The city is pushing for the Menke site, and it seems certain that a site-selection committee, which is scheduled to decide by Feb. 1, will choose it. We wish the Menke property were closer to downtown, but it clearly is the best of the three choices.
BUSINESS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1995
When the city chose the well-known Cordish Co. as the best bet for bringing a steady flow of visitors to the derelict embarrassment called the Power Plant, history weighed heavily in the decision.The history of the complex, shuttered for more than five years after two commercial failures -- and last successful as a steam-generating power plant decades ago.The history of the city's repeated failed attempts to find a tenant capable of redeveloping the hulking, three-building complex.And, most important, the history of the Baltimore-based Cordish Co., known nationwide for redeveloping failed urban projects.
NEWS
December 28, 1994
After watching the Anne Arundel County government, school system and community college fight petty turf battles for years, it's nice to see them at last pledging to work together.The new partnership of County Executive John G. Gary, School Superintendent Carol S. Parham and Anne Arundel Community College President Martha A. Smith makes sense at a time when the county must operate within the confines of a voter-imposed property tax cap.By combining their efforts, the government, schools and college may be able to save money on construction, vehicle maintenance, health insurance and pensions.
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