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BUSINESS
By Marilyn Adams and Marilyn Adams,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 7, 1992
As the recession and economic restructuring continue to cut a swath through the white-collar work force, many companies are hiring specialized consultants to soften the blow.Counselors who offer "career transition" services say corporate shutdowns and downsizings have generated a demand for their work.Such consultants help laid-off managers and executives cope with their loss and learn how to search for a new job in a tight economy.Employers who hire such consultants help not only those laid off. They also help the frightened ones who fear that they might be next.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake defended her decision to require nonessential Baltimore employees to travel to work Thursday or stay home and use vacation time, saying residents need services in severe weather. Union representatives said the decision to allow "liberal leave" - but not to shut down city offices - was inconsistent with Gov. Martin O'Malley's call for Marylanders to stay home during the storm. They said they hoped the mayor would remember the workers' commitment when it came time to finalize their contracts.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake defended her decision to require nonessential Baltimore employees to travel to work Thursday or stay home and use vacation time, saying residents need services in severe weather. Union representatives said the decision to allow "liberal leave" - but not to shut down city offices - was inconsistent with Gov. Martin O'Malley's call for Marylanders to stay home during the storm. They said they hoped the mayor would remember the workers' commitment when it came time to finalize their contracts.
BUSINESS
By Detroit Free Press | February 20, 2007
DETROIT -- Ford Motor Co.'s buyout plan drew an overwhelming response from white-collar employees in parts of the company, prompting the automaker to begin saying no to some offers. Employees who thought they had buyout deals were shocked and angry after learning that the offers were being pulled, some Ford workers told the Detroit Free Press. Yesterday was the final day for workers to accept buyouts. "They got more retirements than they bargained for," a longtime Ford engineer said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Kusnet and By David Kusnet,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 2, 2001
On Labor Day, 2001, the new economy seems to be getting old, with tech start-ups failing, tech stocks tanking, economic growth slowing and layoffs increasing. But, even before the current jitters, many Americans complained that new economy workplaces weren't keeping their promises of flexible rules and schedules, the freedom to do one's best work and unlimited opportunities for those willing to learn new skills and accept new challenges. Instead, many spoke of a nightmarish new workplace, where secure jobs, rising earnings, stable benefits and the traditional bonds of loyalty between employers and employees all were being cast aside.
BUSINESS
By Mary Rowland and Mary Rowland,New York Times News Service | March 9, 1991
Like many executives today, James J. Oden took a look at his life -- a job as director of corporate accounting for Philip Morris in New York, a wife and two kids in New Canaan, Conn. -- and found his work and commute wanting. And like an increasing number of them, he devised a plan to get out of the corporate world and into his own business.Mr. Oden, 43, believed his company had too many people on the payroll, and he figured a way his department could be reorganized -- without him.The company was happy to save money and gave him a lump-sum payment, which he used last September to buy a franchise in Charlotte, N.C., with Tom's Foods, a Georgia-based distributor of snack foods for vending machines and convenience stores.
BUSINESS
By Joyce Lain Kennedy | December 24, 1990
DEAR JOYCE: I notice you focus on white-collar jobs, but I want to trade in a white-collar job to become a truck driver. I've been a drafter, but my company is laying off. Please advise me as I don't want to foul up. -- J.J.Smart fellow. I've had complaints about unscrupulous private truck-driving schools.A happier story features Gordon Hafemann, 43, who recently graduated from U.S. Trucking School in Midway, Colo. A former fleet manager for a car rental company, Hafemann this year decided to change his life.
BUSINESS
By Gerald Graham and Gerald Graham,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 2, 1992
"They told me, 'We don't want you here. You don't belong, and we are going to do all that we can to make you see it our way,' " Steve reported to his manager.Steve is an engineer who recently took a job in a factory rather than be laid off.It was not a smooth change. "When I had that accident with the fork lift last week, I saw that some of the factory guys were standing around laughing," Steve said."One of them said, 'We told you that you would not want to stay around here for long.' I think they sabotaged the equipment."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman | September 16, 1991
As a hard-charging vice president at a commercial real estate company, he thought he had little in common with those forlorn figures lining up for unemployment checks.Then he was laid off from his $40,000-a-year job and ended up in the same line."It was embarrassing to come here and look for a job. I always thought people coming here for unemployment were taking a free ride," said Dennis, 40, who asked that his full name not be used.That view evaporated faster than his 26 weeks of $215 unemployment checks, which eventually expired, as they have for tens of thousands of other Marylanders.
BUSINESS
By Amy Rosewater and Amy Rosewater,Special to The Sun | August 31, 2006
Blue-collar workers once ruled the night. But with manufacturing jobs on the decline, a growing number of white-collar professionals are taking on the physical and personal challenges of working the night shift to meet a growing need for round-the-clock services. About half of the 24 million Americans who work outside the hours of 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. are in white-collar jobs such as technology, finance, calling centers and health care, according to Circadian Technologies Inc., a Stoneham, Mass.
BUSINESS
By Amy Rosewater and Amy Rosewater,Special to The Sun | August 31, 2006
Blue-collar workers once ruled the night. But with manufacturing jobs on the decline, a growing number of white-collar professionals are taking on the physical and personal challenges of working the night shift to meet a growing need for round-the-clock services. About half of the 24 million Americans who work outside the hours of 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. are in white-collar jobs such as technology, finance, calling centers and health care, according to Circadian Technologies Inc., a Stoneham, Mass.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 23, 2005
DETROIT - Anxiety is growing about the shape and size of Ford Motor Co.'s next round of cost and job cuts, which executives have promised will be announced by the end of the year, as at least half a dozen spokespeople were dismissed this week. The Wall Street Journal reported yesterday that white-collar job cuts were discussed at a manufacturing division meeting last month. Workers said the cuts could be as steep as 30 percent of the salaried work force, or more than 10,000 jobs - nearly a third of Ford's white-collar employees, the newspaper reported.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Kusnet and By David Kusnet,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 2, 2001
On Labor Day, 2001, the new economy seems to be getting old, with tech start-ups failing, tech stocks tanking, economic growth slowing and layoffs increasing. But, even before the current jitters, many Americans complained that new economy workplaces weren't keeping their promises of flexible rules and schedules, the freedom to do one's best work and unlimited opportunities for those willing to learn new skills and accept new challenges. Instead, many spoke of a nightmarish new workplace, where secure jobs, rising earnings, stable benefits and the traditional bonds of loyalty between employers and employees all were being cast aside.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | June 23, 1998
The Annapolis city council unanimously approved contracts with two unions last night by a 7-to-0 vote, giving firefighters and white-collar workers a 2 percent salary increase -- the first raise city employees have seen in four years.Yet to be ratified are contracts with the Annapolis police union and the unit of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees that represents blue-collar workers. Both contracts expire June 29.Last night's vote resolves some of the labor issues under discussion for the past five months as city officials and union leaders tried to resolve workers' demands for better pay and better retirement benefits.
NEWS
By Ned Martel and Ned Martel,States News Service | October 29, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A 4.2 percent pay raise for thousands of federal workers in Central Maryland seems all but certain after President Clinton signed a government appropriations bill yesterday that would bring government salaries closer to those in the private sector.The 4.2 percent boost would be the region's first "locality pay" and would take effect in January.The Federal Salary Council, a labor-management group set up to figure out how far apart federal and private-sector salaries were in 28 different regions nationwide, recommended the 4.2 percent pay raise for white-collar federal workers in the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area.
BUSINESS
By Marilyn Adams and Marilyn Adams,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 7, 1992
As the recession and economic restructuring continue to cut a swath through the white-collar work force, many companies are hiring specialized consultants to soften the blow.Counselors who offer "career transition" services say corporate shutdowns and downsizings have generated a demand for their work.Such consultants help laid-off managers and executives cope with their loss and learn how to search for a new job in a tight economy.Employers who hire such consultants help not only those laid off. They also help the frightened ones who fear that they might be next.
FEATURES
By Orange County Register | August 5, 1992
Billy Blanton "became aware" of June Sugden when he was in eighth grade at the little schoolhouse in Mathiston, Miss.For six years he paid her court, promising a life beyond their small town, where roots plunge deep but ambition wilts in damp summer heat.Education was the ticket out, he told her. Education would buy security, put cash money in the bank, let them roam the world in their retirement years.June married Billy 37 years ago and worked five years to support them until he had his ticket -- an engineering degree.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 23, 2005
DETROIT - Anxiety is growing about the shape and size of Ford Motor Co.'s next round of cost and job cuts, which executives have promised will be announced by the end of the year, as at least half a dozen spokespeople were dismissed this week. The Wall Street Journal reported yesterday that white-collar job cuts were discussed at a manufacturing division meeting last month. Workers said the cuts could be as steep as 30 percent of the salaried work force, or more than 10,000 jobs - nearly a third of Ford's white-collar employees, the newspaper reported.
FEATURES
By Orange County Register | August 5, 1992
Billy Blanton "became aware" of June Sugden when he was in eighth grade at the little schoolhouse in Mathiston, Miss.For six years he paid her court, promising a life beyond their small town, where roots plunge deep but ambition wilts in damp summer heat.Education was the ticket out, he told her. Education would buy security, put cash money in the bank, let them roam the world in their retirement years.June married Billy 37 years ago and worked five years to support them until he had his ticket -- an engineering degree.
BUSINESS
By Gerald Graham and Gerald Graham,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 2, 1992
"They told me, 'We don't want you here. You don't belong, and we are going to do all that we can to make you see it our way,' " Steve reported to his manager.Steve is an engineer who recently took a job in a factory rather than be laid off.It was not a smooth change. "When I had that accident with the fork lift last week, I saw that some of the factory guys were standing around laughing," Steve said."One of them said, 'We told you that you would not want to stay around here for long.' I think they sabotaged the equipment."
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