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By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | August 2, 1999
Two chief Baltimore mayoral rivals have begun posting billboards and airing radio ads in each other's voting strongholds. City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III has picked up billboard help across the city from the police and fire unions, while fellow Councilman Martin O'Malley targeted black voters with radio ads. The Fraternal Order of Police, Firefighters Union and Baltimore Fire Officers Association spent $3,000 to post 12 billboards...
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 25, 2006
NEW YORK -- For the past four decades, the predominantly black population of central Brooklyn has been represented in Washington by one of its own, a tradition that dates to the 1968 victory of Shirley Chisholm, the first black woman elected to Congress. But now, in a district whose boundaries were drawn to strengthen black voting power, residents are locked in a wrenching, racially charged debate over an up-and-coming white politician's campaign for Congress. The candidacy of that politician, David Yassky - who has built a reputation as an accomplished, independent-minded councilman - has led to angry accusations of racial carpetbagging.
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NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | June 27, 1999
CAN a white politician be elected mayor of majority-black Baltimore? Poll numbers seem to indicate the answer is yes -- depending on the name of that white candidate.Still, the odds are strongly against such an outcome.Baltimore's politics have always divided along ethnic and racial lines.Look at the long history of the Irish in Northeast Baltimore electing a slew of their compatriots to office, or the long tradition of Jews in Northwest Baltimore siding heavily with home-grown candidates.
NEWS
September 22, 1999
Stokes was right to applaud blacks for cross-racial votingDuring his concession speech on Election Day (Sept. 14), Carl Stokes said he was proud of Baltimore's African-American community, because so many of its members had crossed racial lines and voted for Martin O'Malley.I've thought a great deal about Mr. Stokes' comments. They were generous, because Mr. Stokes might have won, if about 35 percent of African-Americans hadn't voted for a white candidate.They were also perceptive. It makes sense for black Baltimoreans to vote for a qualified black candidate instead of a qualified white candidate.
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | March 1, 1992
Takoma Park. -- In the beginning, the race for Congress in Maryland's new Fourth Congressional District was all about numbers and anger.Draped across the northeast corner of Washington, D.C., the district has drawn more than a dozen Democrats and almost as many Republicans to compete for an open seat.The campaign has seemed at times to stimulate class, regional and racial friction. But with the election two days away, the story may have turned to one of accommodation and even reconciliation.
NEWS
September 22, 1999
Stokes was right to applaud blacks for cross-racial votingDuring his concession speech on Election Day (Sept. 14), Carl Stokes said he was proud of Baltimore's African-American community, because so many of its members had crossed racial lines and voted for Martin O'Malley.I've thought a great deal about Mr. Stokes' comments. They were generous, because Mr. Stokes might have won, if about 35 percent of African-Americans hadn't voted for a white candidate.They were also perceptive. It makes sense for black Baltimoreans to vote for a qualified black candidate instead of a qualified white candidate.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Michael James and Joe Mathews and Michael James,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1999
Martin O'Malley built his victory in white neighborhoods such as Hamilton and Highlandtown, but he sealed his huge margin in areas such as Roundview Road, in the heart of a public housing project in African-American Cherry Hill.Across the street from a polling place there yesterday afternoon, six women who live on this street -- all older than 30, all mothers, all black, all from this south Baltimore neighborhood -- walked into Patapsco Elementary to push a button beside the name of O'Malley, a white man from the other side of the city.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | March 13, 1991
Simon Says:The most terrifying drivers I have ever ridden with have been real estate agents.There is absolutely nothing wrong with George Bush touring Kuwait City. After all, Lincoln toured Richmond.There are few smells as good as a freshly sharpened pencil.The best way to break up a marriage is to play Monopoly with your spouse.If you've always wanted to meet the governor, now you know how to do it: Just send him a nasty letter and he'll come right to TC your door. That's what I call service.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | March 27, 1992
Jesse Jackson tells me he is not tickled with all the credit Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton has received for attracting more black votes than any other presidential candidate this year, in spite of Mr. Clinton's handicap of white skin.Mr. Jackson makes a significant point. Mr. Clinton received an awesome amount of votes in Illinois, Michigan and the Southern state primaries and did almost as well with Hispanics (two-thirds of the Texas Latino vote, according to a Los Angeles Times poll), but his total numbers fell considerably short of what Mr. Jackson showed four years earlier, mainly because black turnout is lower.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | June 24, 1999
OUT OF Martin O'Malley's mouth came the following phrase Tuesday morning: "the integrated and hopeful 3rd District." He said this right at the top, so everybody could notice his sentiments. Then he used this phrase: "working-class families of this city, black and white." He said this maybe 12 seconds later, in case anybody had already forgotten his first reference: It's a city of multiple colors.He said these things standing on the sunlit corner of Harford Road and The Alameda, right by Clifton Park, and right by a sign originally designed to keep drug dealers away, which they naturally ignore, and he said it while announcing his run for mayor of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1999
Nine months ago, state Del. Howard P. "Pete" Rawlings set out on a mission to find a replacement for three-term Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke. He looked over the field of candidates and in a sweeping analysis called them "frightening to people."Then, he tried to pick his own candidate, lobbying NAACP President Kweisi Mfume and other Baltimore County residents to move to the city and run, urging a 70-year-old retired police chief to join the race, and flirting with a mayoral bid himself.In the end, Rawlings backed City Councilman Martin O'Malley, an unlikely prospect for the influential state leader to support, in particular because O'Malley is white and Rawlings is black, in a predominantly African-American city.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Michael James and Joe Mathews and Michael James,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1999
Martin O'Malley built his victory in white neighborhoods such as Hamilton and Highlandtown, but he sealed his huge margin in areas such as Roundview Road, in the heart of a public housing project in African-American Cherry Hill.Across the street from a polling place there yesterday afternoon, six women who live on this street -- all older than 30, all mothers, all black, all from this south Baltimore neighborhood -- walked into Patapsco Elementary to push a button beside the name of O'Malley, a white man from the other side of the city.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | August 20, 1999
ONE OR more of them may yet succeed, but the city election of 1999 has been a perilous thing for kingmakers.At least four of the city's well-known political leaders -- two elected officials, two paid advisers -- have asserted the right and responsibility to anoint the candidate they find best able to direct city affairs.Their efforts have been extraordinarily public in contrast with the king-making cabals and backroom deliberations of Baltimore under the big Democratic bosses. Yet, the kingmaker's enterprise is inherently arrogant, suggesting that the democratic process needs intervention by the self-appointed.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | August 2, 1999
Two chief Baltimore mayoral rivals have begun posting billboards and airing radio ads in each other's voting strongholds. City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III has picked up billboard help across the city from the police and fire unions, while fellow Councilman Martin O'Malley targeted black voters with radio ads. The Fraternal Order of Police, Firefighters Union and Baltimore Fire Officers Association spent $3,000 to post 12 billboards...
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | June 27, 1999
CAN a white politician be elected mayor of majority-black Baltimore? Poll numbers seem to indicate the answer is yes -- depending on the name of that white candidate.Still, the odds are strongly against such an outcome.Baltimore's politics have always divided along ethnic and racial lines.Look at the long history of the Irish in Northeast Baltimore electing a slew of their compatriots to office, or the long tradition of Jews in Northwest Baltimore siding heavily with home-grown candidates.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | June 24, 1999
OUT OF Martin O'Malley's mouth came the following phrase Tuesday morning: "the integrated and hopeful 3rd District." He said this right at the top, so everybody could notice his sentiments. Then he used this phrase: "working-class families of this city, black and white." He said this maybe 12 seconds later, in case anybody had already forgotten his first reference: It's a city of multiple colors.He said these things standing on the sunlit corner of Harford Road and The Alameda, right by Clifton Park, and right by a sign originally designed to keep drug dealers away, which they naturally ignore, and he said it while announcing his run for mayor of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,Sun Staff Writer | August 10, 1995
As the only white candidate in the race for City Council president, Councilman Joseph J. DiBlasi's winning formula is simple: Go after the white vote and hope his three black opponents split the black vote."
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,Sun Staff Writer | September 9, 1995
Since early summer, the four major candidates for City Council president have run a quiet campaign and left the daily drama to the mayoral race -- unwittingly taking themselves out of the limelight and the minds of some voters.Now that there are just a few days before Tuesday's Democratic primary, the candidates -- all in a dead-heat in a mid-August Sun poll -- say they are changing tactics. Gone are the folksy appeals for votes, replaced by pleas on radio and television.Voters "are not paying attention to us," said candidate Carl Stokes.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1999
Campaign signs on the sides of Baltimore buses are boasting the Rev. Martin Luther King's familiar civil rights motto: "They will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character."The twist, however, is that the signs support white mayoral candidate A. Robert Kaufman. Four years after a racially divisive mayoral race, white citywide candidates such as Kaufman find themselves running as the minority.African-American voters hold a 63 percent to 37 percent edge over white voters in the city, an advantage exemplified by Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's trouncing of his 1995 white opponent, Mary Pat Clarke.
NEWS
By Carl T. Rowan | July 12, 1996
WASHINGTON -- When Bob Dole chose to campaign in Richmond, the cradle of the Confederacy, rather than speak to the national convention of the NAACP Tuesday , was he signaling his campaign strategy?Was he indicating that, like some of his predecessors, he intends to run as ''the white man's candidate?''A firestorm of black criticism erupted after Senator Dole snubbed the NAACP invitation. ''He has no interest in what the membership of the NAACP stands for,'' said Rep. Donald Payne, a New Jersey Democrat.
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