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Eileen Ambrose | August 21, 2012
You can receive big bucks and feel good about yourself to by reporting financial fraud. This whistle blower program awards 30 percent of the amount recouped once the Securities and Exchange Commission undertakes an enforcement action against the bad actor. To receive an award, however, the fraud must involve sanctions worth more than $1 million. The SEC announced today that it awarded its first payout - nearly $50,000 - to an unidentified whistle blower who provided documents and other information that helped the SEC with one of its ongoing investigations and prevented further fraud.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
The FBI is investigating a former University of Maryland contract worker who said he took College Park administrators' personal information from the campus network and posted online about the stunt to draw attention to major security flaws. David Helkowski said in an interview with The Baltimore Sun that he noticed vulnerabilities months before a February attack exposed nearly 300,000 sensitive records. Frustrated that issues continued even after he raised concerns while working on a university website, Helkowski said, he took the data to raise alarm.
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NEWS
June 6, 2013
Thanks again for giving proper coverage to the Trial of the Century ("Manning trial begins at Fort Meade," June 4). As a Pfc. Bradley Manning supporter, I am biased, but the court martial has attracted interest around the world. On Monday as the court martial began, I was outside the main gate to Fort Meade with other Manning supporters. In an opening statement, an Army prosecutor stated that Mr. Manning knew that the documents he released "would endanger fellow U.S. soldiers. " Such poppycock astonishes me, but the U.S. government wants more from Private Manning than just a pound of flesh.
NEWS
January 8, 2014
There are various opinions about Edward Snowden, and I feel a need to add mine to the mix ("Snowden has more U.S.-Israel secrets to expose: Greenwald," Jan. 6). Mr. Snowden has violated U.S. laws and needs to be punished, the question is how - death penalty or imprisonment - and if the latter, for how long? To make the public aware of unclassified information makes him a whistle blower, but to publicize classified information makes him a spy. And then to run and hide in Russia shows that he was completely aware of the damage he has done to aspects of our national security.
NEWS
By Joe Davidson, The Washington Post | May 17, 2013
The Justice Department's secret review of Associated Press telephone records gives advocates for federal employees one more reason to doubt the Obama administration's full commitment to protecting whistleblowers, particularly those in national security agencies. Revelations about the department's broad prying into the work, home and mobile phone records of AP journalists in Washington, New York and Hartford, Conn., sent a chill through news organizations. Perhaps that was the point.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2011
Baltimore officials agreed Wednesday to pay $245,000 to settle a federal lawsuit by a police whistle-blower who claimed he was forced to resign after raising concerns about the department's helicopter program. The former officer, Samuel K. Miller, wrote a memo in 2006 criticizing the Police Department for failing to properly train officers in the helicopter unit and to properly maintain the helicopters. The settlement was approved Wednesday by the Board of Estimates. It includes a $120,000 payment to Miller and $125,000 in legal fees and other costs, said City Solicitor George Nilson.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2011
FedEx will pay $8 million to settle a lawsuit filed by a former Crofton shipping center employee accusing the company of defrauding the federal government. Mary Garofolo, who worked for FedEx for 23 years before retiring in May 2007, filed suit against the company under the federal whistle-blower statute after complaints to her supervisors about the scheme were ignored, she said. Her suit was filed under seal to enable government investigators to look into her allegations, which centered on a fraudulent billing scheme involving thousands of late deliveries that FedEx falsely blamed on 9/11-related security delays.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2012
A pollution whistle blower may be granted a financial reward Wednesday at the sentencing of two foreign shipping companies that were illegally pumping oily sludge and plastic into the sea and falsifying records to cover their tracks, according to court filings. The U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Maryland filed a motion in the state's federal court Tuesday asking U.S. District Court Judge Marvin J. Garbis to grant one half of any fine imposed on the companies to ship engineer Salvatore Lopez, who alerted the U.S. Coast Guard in Baltimore to the companies' illicit behavior.
NEWS
November 29, 2012
Finally, the trial of the century made the front page of The Sun ("Accused WikiLeaker to ask for dismissal," Nov. 26). I will join others outside the main gate to Fort Meade to show support for the whistleblower Pfc. Bradley Manning during his latest hearing. Some generations ago, Daniel Ellsberg took the risks of peace and released the Pentagon Papers. The papers revealed how the U.S. government consistently lied about the imperial war in Vietnam. For that remarkable action, Mr. Ellsberg faced the full wrath of the Nixon administration, which was one of the most crooked of all time.
NEWS
August 13, 2013
Let's not start Cold War II - one was quite enough! President Barack Obama's cancellation of the summit talks with Russia's Vladimir Putin was childish, short-sighted and unnecessary ( "No summit, small loss," Aug. 7). No doubt many are furious that NSA whistle blower Edward Snowden slipped away to Russia, but it's time to stay calm and carry on. Too much is at stake today, and this American hissy fit is an embarrassment. I find it ironic that Mr. Obama canceled the summit yet at the same time has proposed ways to put the brakes on U.S. intelligence agencies that are trampling the Constitution and spying unnecessarily on law-abiding American citizens!
NEWS
August 13, 2013
Let's not start Cold War II - one was quite enough! President Barack Obama's cancellation of the summit talks with Russia's Vladimir Putin was childish, short-sighted and unnecessary ( "No summit, small loss," Aug. 7). No doubt many are furious that NSA whistle blower Edward Snowden slipped away to Russia, but it's time to stay calm and carry on. Too much is at stake today, and this American hissy fit is an embarrassment. I find it ironic that Mr. Obama canceled the summit yet at the same time has proposed ways to put the brakes on U.S. intelligence agencies that are trampling the Constitution and spying unnecessarily on law-abiding American citizens!
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2013
A military judge ruled Tuesday that Army Pfc. Bradley E. Manning violated the Espionage Act when he gave a trove of classified material to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks to publish online. But Army Col. Denise Lind found the onetime Marylander not guilty of aiding the enemy - the most serious charge brought by the government, which carries a possible life sentence. Manning, 25, could still be sentenced to decades in prison for leaking hundreds of thousands of war logs, diplomatic cables and battlefield video footage in the largest security breach in U.S. history.
NEWS
July 14, 2013
I'm a bit late, but I would like to lend my support to Melvin A. Goodman for his commentary regarding whistle-blowers ("We need more whistle-blowers," June 23). Whistle-blowers can make contributions toward better government. But now our government is making it too dangerous for most people to even think of doing this; we have become fearful of the consequences of criticizing our own government. "Dissent is patriotic" is to some degree no longer tolerated. I have recently heard that sales of George Orwell's "1984," in which "Big Brother" is constantly watching, have soared.
NEWS
June 27, 2013
As a former co-worker of Thomas Drake, whose work I held in highest regard, I was deeply incensed to see his name linked with those of Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden ("We need more whistle-blowers," June 23). Mr. Drake was a mature, ethical, skilled professional and a true whistle-blower. He was not a callow youth with a dangerously limited understanding or appreciation of the intelligence community, or someone whose revelations were driven by personal ignorance and hubris. Mr. Drake saw a situation in which the National Security Agency was wasting valuable time, manpower and money designing and developing a project that, in many ways, duplicated existing systems that actually did the job better.
NEWS
By Melvin A. Goodman | June 23, 2013
A major problem in the United States is not that there are too many whistle-blowers. Rather, there are too few. Where were the whistle-blowers when the CIA was operating secret prisons; conducting torture and abuse; and kidnapping individuals off the streets in Europe and the Middle East and turning them over to foreign intelligence agencies that conducted torture and abuse? Where were the whistle-blowers when the National Security Agency violated the Fourth Amendment of the Constitution against "unreasonable searches and seizures" and conducted widespread, warrantless eavesdropping?
NEWS
June 6, 2013
Thanks again for giving proper coverage to the Trial of the Century ("Manning trial begins at Fort Meade," June 4). As a Pfc. Bradley Manning supporter, I am biased, but the court martial has attracted interest around the world. On Monday as the court martial began, I was outside the main gate to Fort Meade with other Manning supporters. In an opening statement, an Army prosecutor stated that Mr. Manning knew that the documents he released "would endanger fellow U.S. soldiers. " Such poppycock astonishes me, but the U.S. government wants more from Private Manning than just a pound of flesh.
NEWS
By Daniel W. Whitney | January 29, 2010
Billions of dollars are lost each year nationally to fraudulent Medicare and Medicaid claims. If only legitimate claims were paid, the savings could help pay for health care reform. The federal government has been unable to effectively police against such fraud - but private citizens can make a difference. A federal law known as the False Claims Act (FCA) has been on the books since the Civil War era. Originally designed to combat false claims submitted to the Union Army, the FCA applies to false or fraudulent medical claims submitted to the federal government for payment.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | January 19, 2012
An article by Payments Source, a sister publication of the American Banker, recently reported that J.P. Morgan Chase has stopped filing lawsuits to collect on credit card and other debts in several states - including Maryland. The publication noted that Chase had fired in-house attorneys involved in collections. A review of electronic court records by the American Banker found that Chase collections efforts disappeared in Maryland, California, Florida, New York, and Washington, and dropped off dramatically in Illinois in recent months.
NEWS
By Joe Davidson, The Washington Post | May 17, 2013
The Justice Department's secret review of Associated Press telephone records gives advocates for federal employees one more reason to doubt the Obama administration's full commitment to protecting whistleblowers, particularly those in national security agencies. Revelations about the department's broad prying into the work, home and mobile phone records of AP journalists in Washington, New York and Hartford, Conn., sent a chill through news organizations. Perhaps that was the point.
NEWS
December 3, 2012
Is he a whistle blower or traitor? It can be argued either way, but the critical issue in the case of Pfc. Bradley Manning is his mental health ("Officer: Manning tightly confined to prevent suicide," Nov. 29). When I attended one of the days of hearings at Fort Meade last year, I was struck by how young and vulnerable he appeared. It is difficult to understand how the military trusted him with important secure data when he exhibited behavior that was a cry for help. He is the size of an average 8th grader, and I am sure that makes his ability to adjust to military life extremely difficult.
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