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NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | April 4, 2007
Think "whisk" and the familiar balloon-shaped utensil surely comes to mind -- the bigger, the better for whipping cream and meringues to impressive heights. But for this Sunday's Easter brunches and dinners, cooks are just as likely to pull out the smaller "sauce whisk," essential for marrying the disparate elements of gravies, beurre blancs and other fragile accompaniments. The sauce whisk takes more forms: tightly wound coil, skinny balloon, flat wire. Which performs best? I tested four of these whisks on sauces that would be at home on the Easter table -- a curried mint sauce and a velvety hollandaise.
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NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2010
High-speed cruises could take off from the Inner Harbor as soon as Saturday, according to the head of the company that owns the vessels. Passengers will be whisked away on a 50-minute tour, heading past Fort McHenry and traveling at speeds up to 30 knots to the Key Bridge, said Steve Dutcher, vice president and general manager of Chicago-based Entertainment Cruises. Seadog Ventures Inc., a subsidiary of Entertainment Cruises, received final blessing from the city's spending board Wednesday to run the 120-passenger tours.
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NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | March 10, 2002
Q. Whenever I make egg drop soup, it never turns out like it does in a Chinese restaurant. The eggs are always too big and clumpy. Can you help? A. First of all, there is nothing worse than clumpy eggs. (I'm not sure "clumpy" is a word, but it conjures up a good picture of your soup.) I know that there are recipes out there that suggest pouring the eggs on the surface of the soup and allowing them to set up without stirring. Once the eggs are set up, you are supposed to beat them with a fork.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporter | December 14, 2007
Fearful that homeless residents might freeze to death or be killed in an accidental blaze, Baltimore officials descended on a shantytown under the Jones Falls Expressway yesterday in an effort to move vulnerable individuals to shelters or other types of housing. "No trespassing" and "no camping" signs were posted at the encampment, and city officials and homeless advocates tried to persuade homeless individuals, some of whom suffer from mental illnesses, to leave their tarp-and-pallet-board structures.
NEWS
May 10, 2006
"Remove eggs from the refrigerator 30 minutes before use. This helps to keep mayonnaise from curdling, egg whites will whisk to a greater volume, and shells are less likely to crack during boiling." From "The Silver Spoon" Know a helpful shortcut in the kitchen? Send it to Kate Shatzkin, Food Editor, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278 or e-mail it to food@baltsun.com.
NEWS
By [CHICAGO TRIBUNE ] | May 21, 2006
Terrence Crandall, executive chef at The Peninsula Chicago hotel, serves this rich dessert soup on the hotel's famous chocolate buffet. For a dinner party, serve the soup in small shot glasses or cordial glasses and topped with whipped cream and berries. Perfect for entertaining, this recipe makes enough for a large buffet party. Crandall recommends 64 percent dark chocolate, but any high-quality semisweet chocolate will work. Preparation time: 10 minutes Cooking time: 8 minutes Chilling time: 2 hours CHOCOLATE SOUP 'SHOTS' MAKES 30 SERVINGS 2 containers (1 / 2 pint each)
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | January 21, 2004
Looking for a sweet gift idea for your valentine? How about giving your honey a set of artisanal honey from www.beehivebee products.com? The set comes with nine single-ounce vials corked and sealed with beeswax. Varieties include orange blossom, buckwheat and raspberry. The set is accompanied by a wooden display block and a detailed description of each honey. Price is $45 plus $9 for shipping. Whisks that work wonders Whether you're mixing a salad dressing or frothing a cup of hot chocolate, kitchen toolmaker Kuhn Rikon has a whisk for you. The company's new collection includes the Galaxy Spring Whisk, a 10-inch-long tool designed to whip up small amounts of heavy cream or make lump-free pancake batter.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | July 19, 2006
Midsummer kitchen duties are hot, repetitive and slow. They also can build character. That is what I tell myself these days as I slowly whisk the olive oil into the vinaigrette. I chant it to myself as I wait, ice-filled glass in hand, for the tea to steep in the pot for 3 1/2 minutes. Then I say it again as I pit a mountain of sour cherries. I have done these tasks often enough to know that they deliver payoffs. Delectable things come to those who wait. I know, for instance, that if you add the olive oil in scant batches, the vinaigrette thickens to deliver fine points of style and flavor that a hasty emulsion lacks.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Rector and Sylvia Rector,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 21, 1997
Across America this spring and summer, millions of steaks will hiss and sizzle over the glowing coals of outdoor grills. Some will become memorable entrees. Others will meet unfortunate ends.Nearly all of us think we can cook a steak, no matter how limited our other culinary skills. But the steak requires finesse.It's a matter of perfect timing -- the real key to success. It's matching the cut to the right cooking technique. It's mastering the broiler and the braising pan and the heavy-duty ridged skillet.
NEWS
By Russ Parsons and Russ Parsons,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 2003
Until recently, consommes were relegated to sickroom fare, the kind of thing your maiden aunt might sip sitting in her rocker when her liver was acting up. Then a funny thing happened: Chefs began to rediscover the artistic possibilities of a soothing broth. Now it sometimes seems you can't sit down to a tasting menu without being presented with a dainty little bowl of something around which a perfumed consomme is gently ladled. In a way, this is another case of "what's old is new again."
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN REPORTER | May 30, 2007
The reputed California Bloods leader was supposed to be sentenced for a murder conviction in Baltimore yesterday. But last week, Shaidon "Don Papa" Blake was yanked out of the city's detention center by U.S. marshals who were under orders to bring him to a federal court in Las Vegas, where he faces a gun charge. The move surprised prosecutors, Blake's court-appointed lawyer, Blake's family and even the medical officer who was supposed to perform a psychiatric evaluation on the defendant.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | April 4, 2007
Think "whisk" and the familiar balloon-shaped utensil surely comes to mind -- the bigger, the better for whipping cream and meringues to impressive heights. But for this Sunday's Easter brunches and dinners, cooks are just as likely to pull out the smaller "sauce whisk," essential for marrying the disparate elements of gravies, beurre blancs and other fragile accompaniments. The sauce whisk takes more forms: tightly wound coil, skinny balloon, flat wire. Which performs best? I tested four of these whisks on sauces that would be at home on the Easter table -- a curried mint sauce and a velvety hollandaise.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | July 19, 2006
Midsummer kitchen duties are hot, repetitive and slow. They also can build character. That is what I tell myself these days as I slowly whisk the olive oil into the vinaigrette. I chant it to myself as I wait, ice-filled glass in hand, for the tea to steep in the pot for 3 1/2 minutes. Then I say it again as I pit a mountain of sour cherries. I have done these tasks often enough to know that they deliver payoffs. Delectable things come to those who wait. I know, for instance, that if you add the olive oil in scant batches, the vinaigrette thickens to deliver fine points of style and flavor that a hasty emulsion lacks.
NEWS
By [CHICAGO TRIBUNE ] | May 21, 2006
Terrence Crandall, executive chef at The Peninsula Chicago hotel, serves this rich dessert soup on the hotel's famous chocolate buffet. For a dinner party, serve the soup in small shot glasses or cordial glasses and topped with whipped cream and berries. Perfect for entertaining, this recipe makes enough for a large buffet party. Crandall recommends 64 percent dark chocolate, but any high-quality semisweet chocolate will work. Preparation time: 10 minutes Cooking time: 8 minutes Chilling time: 2 hours CHOCOLATE SOUP 'SHOTS' MAKES 30 SERVINGS 2 containers (1 / 2 pint each)
NEWS
May 10, 2006
"Remove eggs from the refrigerator 30 minutes before use. This helps to keep mayonnaise from curdling, egg whites will whisk to a greater volume, and shells are less likely to crack during boiling." From "The Silver Spoon" Know a helpful shortcut in the kitchen? Send it to Kate Shatzkin, Food Editor, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278 or e-mail it to food@baltsun.com.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | January 21, 2004
Looking for a sweet gift idea for your valentine? How about giving your honey a set of artisanal honey from www.beehivebee products.com? The set comes with nine single-ounce vials corked and sealed with beeswax. Varieties include orange blossom, buckwheat and raspberry. The set is accompanied by a wooden display block and a detailed description of each honey. Price is $45 plus $9 for shipping. Whisks that work wonders Whether you're mixing a salad dressing or frothing a cup of hot chocolate, kitchen toolmaker Kuhn Rikon has a whisk for you. The company's new collection includes the Galaxy Spring Whisk, a 10-inch-long tool designed to whip up small amounts of heavy cream or make lump-free pancake batter.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | July 6, 1994
It looms out of the darkness beyond Route 1 like a huge sci-fi special effect, the long, low buildings illuminated in white and blue, trucks swarming around like bees with headlights. It's 2:50 a.m. and the Produce Market at the Maryland Wholesale Food Center in Jessup is about to open.The "day" here begins at 3 a.m. and selling ends at 9 a.m. But by then, most of the trucks will be gone, scattering over five states to deliver sparkling fresh corn, tomatoes, bananas, arugula, kiwi, onions, cabbage, lettuce, zucchini, chayote, green beans and myriad other fruits and vegetables to eager retailers and restaurateurs.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry | September 15, 1996
SO I TURNED ON MY car radio, and the first thing I heard was the Shouting Car-Dealership Jerk. You know the one I mean. He sounds like this:"BELOW DEALER COST!! MAX SNOTWICK FORD DODGE ISUZU CHEVROLET NISSAN STUDEBAKER TOYOTA IS SELLING CARS AT BELOW DEALER COST!! WE'RE LOSING MONEY ON THESE CARS!! WE HAVE TO MAKE ROOM FOR MORE CARS!! SO WE CAN LOSE MORE MONEY!! WE HAVE PROCESSED CHEESE FOR BRAINS!! THAT'S WHY WE'RE SELLING CARS FOR BELOW DEALER "I immediately did what I always do when the Shouting Car-Dealership Jerk comes on: I changed the station.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | January 4, 2004
THE ADMINISTRATION of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. is seriously exploring the idea of special toll lanes on the Washington and Baltimore beltways that could let Cadillacs and BMWs speed toward dinner at Morton's while the rest of us rot in gridlock. I say: Bring it on. "Congestion pricing," economists call it - paying extra to drive on high-demand routes at high-demand times. It's used in Singapore, London, Houston and Southern California. It may be the future of urban commuting. It certainly is worth a try in this neighborhood, one of the world's traffic-clot showpieces.
NEWS
By Russ Parsons and Russ Parsons,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 2003
Until recently, consommes were relegated to sickroom fare, the kind of thing your maiden aunt might sip sitting in her rocker when her liver was acting up. Then a funny thing happened: Chefs began to rediscover the artistic possibilities of a soothing broth. Now it sometimes seems you can't sit down to a tasting menu without being presented with a dainty little bowl of something around which a perfumed consomme is gently ladled. In a way, this is another case of "what's old is new again."
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