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NEWS
September 14, 1995
It may take months before Baltimoreans fully grasp how much Tuesday's primary election whirlwind altered the city's political landscape.While Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke was renominated to a third term and is standing taller than before, other fixtures in the city's political life -- Mary Pat Clarke, Julian Lapides, Joseph DiBlasi, Vera Hall and Carl Stokes -- were swept aside.Here are some other measures of the changes:After November, when Republicans go through the motion of holding a general election in this heavily Democratic city, Mr. Schmoke could be the only incumbent remaining on the five-member Board of Estimates.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
At some point, a band eyeing pop ubiquity must make a late-night stop at NBC's Studio 8H in Manhattan. In January, it was the turn of Bastille - a British rock quartet riding the success of a chart-topping single called “Pompeii” - to perform on “Saturday Night Live,” and the magnitude was not lost on drummer Chris Wood. If it had been, Wood's friends and family were there to constantly remind him anyway. “Everyone just kept saying to us, 'You realize it's a really big deal, right?
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NEWS
By Arthur J. Magida | September 15, 2002
NEW YORK -- The whirlwind hit New York again Sept. 11, just as it did a year ago. On Wednesday, the winds reached 60 miles an hour. Trees fell. Wires collapsed. Construction supplies were blown from rooftops. Wednesday's winds came down from the skies, the heavens. A year ago Sept. 11, they came from the hell that Lower Manhattan turned into that day. The turbulence of heat and vacuum and momentum and combustion from the World Trade Center generated a micro-climate of dust from incinerated bodies and metal and paper and plastic and dreams -- all whipped about by winds that started in the morning and howled all night and that, in some minds, have not stopped to this day. Long ago, a voice appeared from another whirlwind, one in which God asked Job, "Who is this who darkens counsel by words without knowledge?
FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia and For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Date: July 3 Her story: Pamela Woolford, 47, grew up in Columbia. She is a fiction writer and a former community correspondent for The Baltimore Sun. Her mother, the Rev. Sadie Woolford, lives in Columbia. Her father, Llewellyn Woolford Sr., died in 2012. His story: Gregory Martin, 41, grew up in Middlesex, N.J. He is a music and philosophy teacher at Capital City Public Charter School in Washington, and is also a freelance composer and sound designer. His parents, Mary Ann and Thomas Martin, live in Middlesex.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim smith and By Tim smith,Sun Music Critic | October 13, 2002
Six cities, seven concerts, two train trips, four flights, 24 bus rides. Gee, sounds like fun, doesn't it? Cramming all of that activity into a 12-day span -- during mostly hot, humid weather, by the way -- may not be the most relaxing way to visit Japan. But it's old hat for many members of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, which had toured that country twice before its just-completed excursion. Veterans and newcomers alike took it all in stride. And music director Yuri Temirkanov, making only his second overseas trip with the BSO, is certainly no stranger to exhausting tour schedules with his other orchestra, the St. Petersburg Philharmonic.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2000
The contractual foundation for Orioles ace Mike Mussina's negotiations with the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox began to form yesterday as the right-hander's agent visited with executives for both clubs during a whirlwind East Coast tour. Arn Tellem, Mussina's representative, met first with Yankees general manager Brian Cashman, then shuttled to Boston for face-to-face negotiations with Red Sox general manager Dan Duquette. The Yankees and Red Sox pressed their interest in the fourth-winningest pitcher in Orioles history while receiving assurances from Tellem that Mussina is not merely using the American League East contenders' big pockets to prime his market.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN REPORTER | September 20, 2006
The whirlwind hit Chris Chester hard and fast. When the Ravens selected the offensive lineman from the University of Oklahoma in the second round of April's draft, Chester was suddenly confronted with - among other responsibilities - learning a new playbook, developing a rapport with his new teammates and becoming familiar with a city that is much different from his former home of Norman, Okla. Ravens@Browns Sunday, 4:05 p.m., Ch. 13, 97.9 FM, 1090 AM Line: Ravens by 6 1/2
FEATURES
October 27, 2006
Catch a Fire Rating -- PG-13 What it's about -- Young African working-class man is radicalized by his encounter with the repressive state police during apartheid. The kid attractor factor -- Derek Luke, Tim Robbins, a striking setting. Good lessons/bad lessons -- Those who use terror to fight terror will reap a whirlwind. Violence -- Beatings, torture, see the rating. Language -- Some profanity. Sex -- None, discussed, though. Drugs -- None. Parents' advisory -- A South African history lesson, this is suitable for teenagers old enough to get what it's about.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2003
In entertainment circles, the early months of every year are an exhilarating whirlwind of glamour, parties and prizes galore. It's a time packed with award ceremonies ranging from the Grammys and the Golden Globes to the British Academy of Film and Television Arts awards (BAFTA) and the Screen Actors Guild awards. And, of course, the red carpets that go along with them. Alas, last Sunday's Oscars marked the official end of the year's busiest season for these award ceremonies. As always, it was a fashionable period marked by stars' glorious hits and puzzling misses.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Walter F. Roche Jr. and David Nitkin and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2002
Aides to Gov.-elect Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. said yesterday that his campaign used a deeply discounted helicopter service more often than initially disclosed, and provided other details that raised more legal questions about the trips. Ehrlich spokesman Paul E. Schurick said the campaign used the luxury executive helicopter eight times between April and November, including a trip to New York related to Ehrlich's congressional duties. Initially, the campaign said it made six trips. Much of the helicopter use was donated by Whirlwind Aviation Inc., a company with close ties to Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc., owners of WBFF Fox 45. Schurick could provide dates and locations for only six of the eight trips; the campaign has received post-dated bills for all of them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and Assistant editor, b | January 19, 2014
That "glamorous pirate" Lord Gillingham is working on some sort of Guinness World Record of pursuit here.  I'd be weirded out a bit if Tony wasn't more likeable. He's proper, but not insufferable. And doesn't get drunk easily like Sir John "Dimples" Bullock. And Mary is clearly a catch -- she has the looks, the property and side-saddle riding abilities. But compared with Matthew Crawley's epic 147-year courtship of Mary, Lord Gillingham's unexpected marriage proposal seems pretty jarring.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
SARASOTA, Fla. - Around this time last year, Manny Machado spent his spring on a nomadic journey shuffling between the Orioles' minor league and major league camps. He wore No. 95. When he made appearances in the major league camp, he dressed in an auxiliary clubhouse isolated from the big league players. But after an early-August call-up from Double-A Bowie - a move that helped propel the Orioles to the playoffs - the 20-year-old Machado is entrenched in the clubhouse this spring.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
Volvo Ocean Race officials were whisked to the top of the World Trade Center, honored as guests at a reception and squired to the grassy expanse of Fort McHenry during a 24-hour courtship meant to seal the deal to make Baltimore the event's only U.S. port of call in 2015. "I think they wanted validation on some things, and I think we delivered," Terry Hasseltine, executive director of the Maryland Office of Sports Marketing, said Tuesday of the previous day's visit. "We had an open dialogue, and I think it was conveyed to them loud and clear that we have a dynamic team in place.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2012
One afternoon in early June, Ken Mallette was in Jacksonville driving from a funeral when he got a text message about severe storms striking Maryland. One of the storms' 11 tornadoes had just ravaged nearby Fallston. In his second week as executive director of the Maryland Emergency Management Agency, Mallette arrived in Fallston in a matter of minutes rather than head back to the state's emergency command center in Reisterstown. He surveyed the damage and met with Harford County Executive David Craig.
SPORTS
Mike Preston | June 1, 2012
Charley Toomey's office phone line is so flooded that it no longer accepts incoming calls. The Loyola men's lacrosse coach has spent the past couple of days responding to emails, so he really hasn't had a chance to think a lot about his team's national championship. It apparently hasn't set in with his wife, Sara, either. "I don't know if it will," Toomey, a father of three, said with a laugh. "The next thing I'm going to hear is, 'Honey, go out and cut the grass. You've been involved in a lot the past two weeks, so it's time to mow the lawn.' "Maybe later this summer when I'm out on the [Chesapeake]
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2011
Few understand the club that Adam Riess joined Tuesday when he received a 5:30 a.m. phone call from Sweden. But Carol Greider received the same call two years ago, and soon she'll sit with her Johns Hopkins University colleague and tell him what it's like to become a Nobel laureate. "It's going to be a complete whirlwind at first," the molecular biologist said after a news conference for Riess. "First it's the press, but then it's the academic community. I was getting 200 to 300 emails a day after I won. " A Nobel victory creates many ripples.
NEWS
By David Nitkin, Walter F. Roche Jr. and David Folkenflik and David Nitkin, Walter F. Roche Jr. and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2002
Gov.-elect Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. has been given extensive use of a luxury executive helicopter provided at an apparent discount by a company with ties to two Maryland television stations. Most recently, Ehrlich and his family used the $2,500-an-hour aircraft eight days after the election to travel between Washington and Ocean City, where he was vacationing. Campaign aides acknowledged yesterday that no payments have been made for the chartered helicopter services, provided by Whirlwind Aviation Inc. of Frederick, though the flights date to April.
NEWS
December 31, 2006
First Night Annapolis, tonight's 16th annual celebration of the arts, will usher in the new year with more than 20 new acts. Additions to the program of dance, magic acts and musical performances throughout downtown include 1st Samuel, a high-energy group of young gospel singers, comedian Kelly Terranova, Whirlwind Woodwinds and a tour of little-known historic African-American sites. The celebration will begin with the children's program, "First Act," from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts on Chase Street.
EXPLORE
By Rebecca Oppenheimer | July 28, 2011
July kicks off with an Independence Day celebration, so it is easy to associate the whole month with all things American. Why not break the mold this summer? Choose one of these works of foreign fiction to finish off your July with an international flair. "The Shadow of a Blue Cat" by Naoyuki Ii Dalkey Archive, $17.95 Much of the Japanese fiction published in the United States tends towards the offbeat and disturbing. "The Shadow of a Blue Cat" is a different breed entirely.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2011
Wide receiver Torrey Smith , the Ravens' second-round draft pick, attended Saturday's Red-White football game, visiting with his former Maryland teammates. Smith wore red a Maryland Terrapins T-shirt (not a Ravens shirt). He received one of the loudest ovations of the day when introduced to the Byrd Stadium crowd. Smith had 67 catches and 12 touchdowns last season. But Ravens fans may not know that he played much of the year with a sore ankle that has now had time to heal. He had seemed to pull up and limp after scoring on a 68-yard pass in the Florida International game in September.
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