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By Rita St. Clair | December 23, 1990
I'm not a newcomer to the field of interior design and I tend to be somewhat skeptical about products that suddenly become wildly popular. It's just a fad, I often tell myself.Sometimes I'm right. Other times, however, what seemed like a passing fancy proves to have real staying power. That's clearly the case with the whirlpool bath.This luxury item is now found in many homes, not all of them owned by the rich and trendy. Whirlpools have become so common that I'm regularly asked for advice about installation and accessories.
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NEWS
May 21, 2013
There is an old adage, often heard in the local marinas, that a boat is nothing more than a hole in the water into which you pour money. Turns out the same could be said about Baltimore's water and sewer system - it is a money-soaking hole that puts the Queen Mary to shame. That the city's water system is old and deteriorating is nothing new. No doubt there are pipes still in the ground that would have served Edgar Allan Poe in his day - if the notorious drinker ever had a taste for non-alcoholic beverages, that is. But that problem was apparent last year, and the year before, and the year before that, and on and on. For more than a decade, Baltimore has been raising water rates annually by 9 percent or more.
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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | November 16, 1994
CHICAGO -- Continuing a trend among large companies of cutting employment even in times of prosperity, the Whirlpool Corp. said yesterday that it would close two North American factories and reduce its worldwide work force by 3,200, more than 7 percent.The cutbacks will result in a one-time charge of $240 million against earnings in the current quarter, but are expected eventually to save $150 million in annual operating expenses. Whirlpool, based in Benton Harbor, Mich., has earned $249 million on sales of $6 billion in the first nine months of the year.
BUSINESS
By Barbara Rose and Barbara Rose,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 7, 2008
CHICAGO - Smoking is a lightning rod for controversy, as is the question of whether workers who smoke should have to pay more for their health insurance. It's no wonder then that Whirlpool Corp. made headlines last month for suspending 39 workers who were seen smoking outside their Evansville, Ind., factory despite enrolling for insurance as nonsmokers. Whirlpool's smokers pay $500 a year more for their employer-provided health insurance - a penalty big enough to increase the likelihood of cheating - but how would the company find out?
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 23, 2005
Maytag Corp. directors, after waiting in vain for a rival suitor to raise its bid, agreed yesterday to sell the company to longtime appliance-industry rival Whirlpool Corp. for $1.7 billion. The proposed acquisition is far from a sure thing, however. Because a Whirlpool/Maytag combination will hold a nearly 50 percent share in certain segments of the household-appliance marketplace, the acquisition is expected to face tough, protracted scrutiny from federal antitrust regulators. Yesterday's accord ends a lengthy bidding process that began in May, when an investor group led by the New York buyout firm of Ripplewood Holdings offered to buy financially struggling Maytag for $14 a share, or $1.12 billion.
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 28, 2005
Maytag Corp. has agreed to open its books to suitor Whirlpool Corp., as the two appliance-industry rivals edged closer to a possible deal. Whirlpool, of Benton Harbor, Mich., said yesterday that it entered into a confidentiality agreement with Maytag, under which Whirlpool can "immediately commence" the in-depth examination of a buyout target's nonpublic financial materials. Whirlpool has said it is willing to pay $18 a share, or about $1.43 billion, to buy Maytag, assuming a review of Maytag's finances turns up no previously unknown problems.
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 13, 2005
CHICAGO - Maytag Corp.'s board, reversing its earlier stance, declared Whirlpool Corp.'s risky but richer $21-a-share buyout proposal to be superior to the $14-a-share bid that Maytag earlier accepted from a private investment group. The Newton, Iowa, company's move late yesterday appears to put Whirlpool's $1.7 billion bid in the lead as the fight over Maytag moves into its final stage. But Whirlpool hasn't won yet. The contest for Maytag began in May, when an investor group led by the New York leveraged-buyout group Ripplewood Holdings offered to buy the company for $14 a share, or $1.11 billion.
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 9, 2005
Whirlpool Corp., seeking to dislodge another bidder and lock up a deal, raised its buyout bid for struggling industry rival Maytag Corp. $2 yesterday to $20 a share, or $1.6 billion. In a rare and potentially costly maneuver, Whirlpool's offer also includes a promise to pay Maytag a $120 million "reverse breakup fee" if the government blocks the acquisition on antitrust grounds. The sweetened offer "reflects both the value we see in the combination of Whirlpool and Maytag and the confidence we have in the ultimate receipt of regulatory approval for the transaction," said Whirlpool Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Jeff Fettig.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1994
Electric car battery productionGeneral Motors and a battery technology company will start commercial-scale production of nickel metal-hydride batteries for electric cars next year, the companies announced yesterday.Nickel metal-hydrides store about twice as much electricity per pound as lead-acid batteries, and can deliver the energy quickly. A Geo Metro converted to electricity with nickel metal-hydrides won a electric car race in Phoenix early this year by traveling more than 200 miles at highway speeds without recharging.
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 19, 2005
Maytag Corp. shares jumped yesterday after rival Whirlpool Corp. unexpectedly unveiled a $17-a-share buyout bid to become Maytag's third suitor. Despite a number of question marks that surround Whirlpool's $1.37 billion cash-and-stock proposal, investors bet that Maytag will draw an even higher bid: In New York Stock Exchange trading, Maytag shares surged $2.03, or 13 percent, to close at $17.48. Whirlpool said that if it succeeds in acquiring cash-strapped Maytag, it could strengthen the smaller company's competitive position by introducing technological innovations and economies of scale.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun Columnist | November 14, 2006
When it comes to the art of complaining, there is a very fine line between being determined and being a pain. Lil Jungreis worried that she crossed that line after she spent two years calling Whirlpool Corp. about a defective refrigerator she purchased in October 2004. "They make like I am crazy or like I don't know what I am talking about," Jungreis said of her repeated calls for repair. "Almost from the very beginning, I thought I did something wrong. I felt so bad. I spoke to so many different people.
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 23, 2005
Maytag Corp. directors, after waiting in vain for a rival suitor to raise its bid, agreed yesterday to sell the company to longtime appliance-industry rival Whirlpool Corp. for $1.7 billion. The proposed acquisition is far from a sure thing, however. Because a Whirlpool/Maytag combination will hold a nearly 50 percent share in certain segments of the household-appliance marketplace, the acquisition is expected to face tough, protracted scrutiny from federal antitrust regulators. Yesterday's accord ends a lengthy bidding process that began in May, when an investor group led by the New York buyout firm of Ripplewood Holdings offered to buy financially struggling Maytag for $14 a share, or $1.12 billion.
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 13, 2005
CHICAGO - Maytag Corp.'s board, reversing its earlier stance, declared Whirlpool Corp.'s risky but richer $21-a-share buyout proposal to be superior to the $14-a-share bid that Maytag earlier accepted from a private investment group. The Newton, Iowa, company's move late yesterday appears to put Whirlpool's $1.7 billion bid in the lead as the fight over Maytag moves into its final stage. But Whirlpool hasn't won yet. The contest for Maytag began in May, when an investor group led by the New York leveraged-buyout group Ripplewood Holdings offered to buy the company for $14 a share, or $1.11 billion.
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 9, 2005
Whirlpool Corp., seeking to dislodge another bidder and lock up a deal, raised its buyout bid for struggling industry rival Maytag Corp. $2 yesterday to $20 a share, or $1.6 billion. In a rare and potentially costly maneuver, Whirlpool's offer also includes a promise to pay Maytag a $120 million "reverse breakup fee" if the government blocks the acquisition on antitrust grounds. The sweetened offer "reflects both the value we see in the combination of Whirlpool and Maytag and the confidence we have in the ultimate receipt of regulatory approval for the transaction," said Whirlpool Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Jeff Fettig.
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 28, 2005
Maytag Corp. has agreed to open its books to suitor Whirlpool Corp., as the two appliance-industry rivals edged closer to a possible deal. Whirlpool, of Benton Harbor, Mich., said yesterday that it entered into a confidentiality agreement with Maytag, under which Whirlpool can "immediately commence" the in-depth examination of a buyout target's nonpublic financial materials. Whirlpool has said it is willing to pay $18 a share, or about $1.43 billion, to buy Maytag, assuming a review of Maytag's finances turns up no previously unknown problems.
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 19, 2005
Maytag Corp. shares jumped yesterday after rival Whirlpool Corp. unexpectedly unveiled a $17-a-share buyout bid to become Maytag's third suitor. Despite a number of question marks that surround Whirlpool's $1.37 billion cash-and-stock proposal, investors bet that Maytag will draw an even higher bid: In New York Stock Exchange trading, Maytag shares surged $2.03, or 13 percent, to close at $17.48. Whirlpool said that if it succeeds in acquiring cash-strapped Maytag, it could strengthen the smaller company's competitive position by introducing technological innovations and economies of scale.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun Columnist | November 14, 2006
When it comes to the art of complaining, there is a very fine line between being determined and being a pain. Lil Jungreis worried that she crossed that line after she spent two years calling Whirlpool Corp. about a defective refrigerator she purchased in October 2004. "They make like I am crazy or like I don't know what I am talking about," Jungreis said of her repeated calls for repair. "Almost from the very beginning, I thought I did something wrong. I felt so bad. I spoke to so many different people.
NEWS
November 22, 1995
Police logEllicott City: 3400 block of Jay Court: Someone tried to steal TC 1987 Acura Legend after prying open its door Friday or Saturday, police said.Ellicott City: 5300 block of Sunnyfield Court: Burglars broke into a house under construction and stole a whirlpool tub and a patio door Nov. 15 or 16, police said.Ellicott City: 10000 block of Autumn View Lane: A gray 1986 Acura Legend with Maryland tags AZL-436 was stolen Friday or Saturday, police said.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 10, 2004
As any reader of the Brothers Grimm, L. Frank Baum or even J.K. Rowling can attest, the idea of a magic wand casts a powerful spell on the human imagination. Probably no sooner did our cave-dwelling forebears wield their first stick, in fact, than they began longing for even more powerful technologies to make life easier. Harried homemakers, then, may be intrigued to learn that a new type of magic wand is about to alter the way we live. Will it (gling!) turn drab footwear into red sequined pumps a la The Wizard of Oz?
NEWS
By Annie Peroutka and Annie Peroutka,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2003
On July 2, 1863, the charge and countercharge over the 19 acres of the Wheatfield resulted in 4,000 dead and wounded Union and Confederate soldiers on the second day of fighting at Gettysburg. "The Wheatfield has been aptly called the `whirlpool' of battle, because of the manner in which regiments on both sides were seemingly sucked into its vortex," observes author Edward J. Stackpole in They Met At Gettysburg. The fighting began about 4:30 p.m. on farmer George Rose's fields, At 4:30 p.m., Col. P. Regis de Trobriand was positioned with Union regiments along the southern edge of the Wheatfield behind a stone wall.
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