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By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | April 5, 2006
What is the difference between heavy cream and whipping cream anyway? The Code of Federal Regulations defines cream as "the liquid milk product high in fat separated from milk" that must contain not less than 18 percent milk fat. Light cream contains between 18 percent and 30 percent milk fat; light whipping cream (also called whipping cream) contains between 30 percent and 36 percent milk fat; heavy cream contains at least 36 percent milk fat. The more fat cream has, the better and easier it will whip.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2012
The annual Pillsbury Bake-Off concluded today in Orlando, Fla.  The $1 million winner was annonced live on "The Martha Stewart Show. " Here is Christina Verrelli winning recipe for Pumpkin Ravioli with Salted Caramel Whipped Cream. Among the 100 finalists were two Baltimore area residents. Susann Studz competed in the Entertaining Appetizers category with Sushi-Style Crescent Crab Rolls , and Laura Majchrzak competed in the Sweet Treats category with her original Carrot Cake Tart recipe.
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FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | January 17, 2001
THESE ARE biscuit-baking times. Hot and flaky, fresh from the oven, homemade biscuits can easily be the bright spot of a winter day. During these dreary months, it does not take much to constitute a highlight. Anything warm is welcome. Some folks say baking soothes the soul. Maybe so, but a lesser motive moved me to bake a batch of biscuits - hunger. I had been shut out at supper one night when I tried to get second helpings of the batch of buttermilk biscuits that my wife and older son had whipped up. One minute there were a dozen steaming biscuits sitting in the middle of the dinner table.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | June 21, 2009
Cynthia Dillon and Shiney Ann John stood outside Oakland Mills Middle School splattered with whipped cream and couldn't have been happier. The two administrators agreed that a pie-throwing contest - where up to 20 lucky students in each grade level got an opportunity to throw whipped cream pies - was the perfect way to end the school year. Students were picked during a raffle where they traded in tickets they had accumulated for good behavior throughout the year for a chance at a slew of prizes, including the pie-throwing contest.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | August 1, 1999
The most trying part of making old-fashioned homemade ice cream isn't turning the crank till your arm aches. It's standing over a hot stove, stirring the simmering custard base for the ice cream, then waiting while it cools enough to be freezable.Not all ice cream recipes require cooking, but those that don't rarely have the rich taste or velvety texture of ones made with a custard base -- the kind you typically simmer and whisk constantly to keep from curdling. Here are two ideas for streamlining the whole process without compromising the quality of the finished ice cream.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | July 31, 1991
Here's a recipe I can't wait to try. This recipe, from Charlene Pedersen of Baltimore, is for Geneva Sneed of Baltimore. Geneva says she loves to bake cakes. I'm impressed with her willpower -- she says she only eats a small slice of each cake because she is trying to maintain a weight loss. Oh that I coulddo the same.Peaches and Cream Cake1 18-ounce package butter-style cake mix1 1/4 cups sugar4 tablespoons cornstarch4 cups fresh peaches, chopped1/2 cup water2 cups whipping cream3 tablespoons powdered sugar1 cup sour creamFresh peach slices for garnishPrepare cake according to directions on package, using two eight-inch pans.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | August 25, 1993
Q: Some baking recipes say to cool in the pan; others say to cool on a wire rack. Which is better?A: A method that combines both is usually recommended. As a rule of thumb, cakes and other baked goods should be left in their pans on a wire rack to cool for about 10 minutes. If you try to remove a cake from its pan immediately after baking, it can stick or fall apart because it is so tender. By letting some baked products sit in the pan for a short period of time, the edges begin to cool and pull away from the sides, making removal easier.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | March 13, 1991
EVERY CHOCOLATE LOVER will want to check out "Th Pillsbury Chocolate Lover's Cookbook." The cookbook (Doubleday, 1991) is full of wonderful, easy-to-make recipes.Here is one of the book's recipes.@Cookies and CreamCrust:2 cups (24 cookies) finely crushed creme-filled chocolate sandwich cookies (like Oreo's)1/3 cup margarine or butter, meltedFilling:2 8-ounce packages cream cheese, softened2/3 cup sugar1 tablespoon vanilla1 cup whipping cream, whipped2 ounces (2 squares) semi-sweet chocolate gratedChocolate cutouts, see directions belowIn large bowl, combine crust ingredients; blend well.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer | July 21, 1993
Tiramisu, which is pronounced tier-eh-me-zuu, has recently gained recognition in "Sleepless in Seattle," a movie comedy in which a widower played by Tom Hanks thinks tiramisu is something sexual, rather than a light, sweet Italian dessert.A recipe was in order. Rita T. Werthamer of Baltimore requested the recipe several weeks ago and Chef Syglowski, who tests the recipes sent in, chose those of Joan Demshock of Timonium and Karen Zorn of Ellicott City.Demshock's tiramisuYields 10 to 12 servings6 egg yolks1 1/4 cups sugar1 1/4 cups mascarpone (a soft creamy)
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 4, 2000
A light midday meal is often far easier to execute than a dinner party. I realized this as I began to plan a luncheon for a good friend. As a first course, I'm going to serve a warm vegetable salad. The main course will be a rich pureed asparagus soup, garnished with dollops of cream fraiche and chopped chives and served with crusty baguettes. Fresh strawberries tossed with sugar and offered with good cookies will end the meal. The soup is uncomplicated to prepare. Some creme fraiche is stirred into it at the last minute.
NEWS
By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | April 23, 2008
I have several recipes, mostly frostings and casseroles, that call for heavy or whipping cream. Can I substitute canned milk? Cream spoils before I can use it all. The answer would be a resounding "maybe." First, remember that there are two kinds of canned milk. Sweetened condensed milk has had about 60 percent of the water removed and a lot of sugar added. It has a distinctive taste and texture, and should be used only in recipes that call for it. Evaporated milk has been heated to remove about 60 percent of the water; it's available in whole, low-fat and nonfat varieties.
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | April 5, 2006
What is the difference between heavy cream and whipping cream anyway? The Code of Federal Regulations defines cream as "the liquid milk product high in fat separated from milk" that must contain not less than 18 percent milk fat. Light cream contains between 18 percent and 30 percent milk fat; light whipping cream (also called whipping cream) contains between 30 percent and 36 percent milk fat; heavy cream contains at least 36 percent milk fat. The more fat cream has, the better and easier it will whip.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2004
Donna L. Sanderson of Salem, Ore., remembers a peppermint dessert that had crushed peppermint, whipped cream, miniature marshmallows and graham crackers and was served in small squares. She jokes that she is no cook but wants that recipe. LaVonne G. Hill of Walkersville responded. She wrote, "I have your recipe. It is from a cookbook entitled Our Favorite Desserts: Favorites From Home Economics Teachers, published 1967. I grew up in North Dakota where graham-cracker refrigerator desserts are very common.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | December 14, 2003
At our home we have a small Christmas gathering, but I love having food that is ready and waiting when company arrives. Creamy soups that can be simmered to perfection days beforehand are often first-course choices. Accompaniments such as potato gratins or roasted vegetables, both of which can be cooked ahead and reheated at serving time, are also favorites. Whether the entree is ham, turkey or fillet of beef, I often pair it with a spicy chutney or savory relish prepared earlier. But desserts, I think, lend themselves most easily to advance assembly.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2003
Sometimes a cookbook isn't just a cookbook. For example, The New England Clam Shack Cookbook: Favorite Recipes From Clam Shacks, Lobster Pounds & Chowder Houses by Brooke Dojny (Storey Books, 2003, $16.95) is as much of a travelogue and study of foodways as it is a collection of recipes. As Dojny visited restaurants from Maine to Connecticut along what she dubs a "Seafood Trail," she didn't just gather directions and ingredients. She learned the history of shacks, pounds and houses and the origins of sundry dishes such as chowder and fried clams.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2001
June Cummins of Touchet, Wash., wrote: "My sister and I are seeking a recipe for Sour Cream Cake that our mother made. It was made with real cream, soured, not the cultured kind we buy. "It was heavy and contained no shortening due to the cream and was frosted with brown sugar fudge-type frosting."
FEATURES
By Rose Dosti and Rose Dosti,Los Angeles Times | October 23, 1991
Sometimes potluck parties are organized at the last minute. But instead of picking up a bucket of chicken on the way, cook something quick or "doctor up" food you have picked up from the supermarket.Easy Cassoulet2 tablespoons olive oil1 cup chopped onion1 carrot, peeled and diced1 stalk celery, diced1 clove garlic, minced8 chicken drumsticks1/4 cup tomato paste1/2 cup white or red wine1 cup broth or water, about2 (1-pound) cans white beansSalt, pepperDash paprika1 bay leaf1 teaspoon dried oregano4 smoked sausage links, halvedHeat olive oil in Dutch oven.
FEATURES
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | December 6, 2000
Beef or venison, suet, citron, cider: These unlikely ingredients are the stuff of which traditional mincemeat - rich, dark and spicy-sweet - is made. For many families, mince pies are a must-have for the holidays, only these days the mincemeat may be store-bought and meatless. The make-ahead recipe below offers a contemporary version of mince pie for friends and family to enjoy. Anyone who loves mince pie a la mode will appreciate this creation. Mincemeat Ice Cream Pie Serves 8 to 10 1 quart French Vanilla Ice Cream, slightly softened (recipe below)
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | January 17, 2001
THESE ARE biscuit-baking times. Hot and flaky, fresh from the oven, homemade biscuits can easily be the bright spot of a winter day. During these dreary months, it does not take much to constitute a highlight. Anything warm is welcome. Some folks say baking soothes the soul. Maybe so, but a lesser motive moved me to bake a batch of biscuits - hunger. I had been shut out at supper one night when I tried to get second helpings of the batch of buttermilk biscuits that my wife and older son had whipped up. One minute there were a dozen steaming biscuits sitting in the middle of the dinner table.
FEATURES
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | December 6, 2000
Beef or venison, suet, citron, cider: These unlikely ingredients are the stuff of which traditional mincemeat - rich, dark and spicy-sweet - is made. For many families, mince pies are a must-have for the holidays, only these days the mincemeat may be store-bought and meatless. The make-ahead recipe below offers a contemporary version of mince pie for friends and family to enjoy. Anyone who loves mince pie a la mode will appreciate this creation. Mincemeat Ice Cream Pie Serves 8 to 10 1 quart French Vanilla Ice Cream, slightly softened (recipe below)
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