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NEWS
November 19, 1992
If the natural splendors of the Merrick farm in Baltimore County's Cromwell Valley are to be bulldozed for a pricey housing tract, we might have the perfect name for the development:Schaefer's Whim.For it's at the whim of Gov. William Donald Schaefer whether the 216-acre property is preserved through an outlay of public money or handed over to developers.Since 1988, the Merrick family has sought to sell its land to the state and the county to ensure its preservation as a precious green expanse just outside Towson.
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NEWS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,Special to The Sun | March 4, 2007
Chris Hoffman loves to surpass other people's expectations of him. For example, the sophomore joined the Aberdeen junior varsity football team for the first time last fall and started at center and nose guard despite being 5 feet 4 and 112 pounds. And as a freshman last year, Hoffman went out for the varsity wrestling team despite being a novice in the sport. He picked things up quickly, however, and finished with a 22-13 record at 103 pounds. After working tirelessly throughout the spring and summer to gain experience, Hoffman won his first 35 matches at 112 pounds this season.
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SPORTS
By Marty McGee and Marty McGee,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 29, 1990
LAUREL -- If it holds together, the $100,000 Congressional Handicap at Laurel Race Course today shapes up as one of Maryland's most attractive races of the year."
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 14, 2006
Slow down and dare to be great: That's my message to Richard Linklater, the audacious director of A Scanner Darkly. He's at a time in his career when he seems ready to follow through on any notion he finds in his creative kitchen down in Austin, Texas, then deliver it to the public no matter what stage it is in the baking process. Don't get me wrong: A Scanner Darkly isn't half-baked. It's more three-quarters-baked, and it took years to get its complicated animation to the point where it expressed the scary ups and downs of the characters and the paranoid terrors of their drug-riddled world.
SPORTS
By Dale Austin and Dale Austin,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 12, 1990
LAUREL -- With the Laurel Turf Cup switched to the dirt track, people around the winner's circle yesterday couldn't resist referring to it as the "Laurel Dirt Cup."The race carried a $100,000 guaranteed purse, and the nine starters all had their names on saddlecloths made just for the occasion.But with a change in racing surface and a reduction in distance from 1 1/2 miles to 1 1/4 miles, it was open to a little joking.Trainer Rodger Gill smiled for a different reason, however. Things were just fine for Gill, trainer of Chas' Whim, the winner.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee and Marty McGee,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 30, 1991
LAUREL -- The last time Runaway Stream raced against Chas' Whim, everyone was in a fog. Literally."That was the day the fog was real heavy," said Randy Bright, assistant to Runaway Stream's trainer, Larry Murray.But since the Congressional Handicap was run at Laurel Race Course last December, Runaway Stream and Chas' Whim have remained among Maryland's top handicap horses. Chas' Whim won that last meeting, but Runaway Stream, owned by Howard Bender of Bethesda, has been more active and more accomplished this year.
NEWS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,Staff writer | October 28, 1990
Glenelg High School's field hockey team used the wind and a coach's whim at Centennial to earn a thrilling come-from-behind, 2-1 victory Friday and a piece of the county championship.The Gladiators, working with an advantageous wind at their backs, erased a 1-0 halftime deficit midway through the second half on a goal by Beth Terry, then won it on reserve forward Jennifer Anderson's goal with 2:40 left in the game.Glenelg surrendered a goal by Anna Lee just 1 minute, 25 seconds into the game, then shut the Eagles down to gain a co-county championship with the Eagles.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee and Marty McGee,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 30, 1990
LAUREL -- Most of Maryland's top handicap horses were present for the $100,000 Congressional Handicap at Laurel Race Course yesterday. Chas' Whim literally emerged fastest.First out of a fog that had enveloped the track all day, the 3-year-old gelding completed a 1 3/4 -length, wire-to-wire victory over a muddy track."This is just one good horse," said trainer Rodger Gill, who was winning the Congressional for the fourth time. Gill had sent out Delay to victories in the race in 1973, 1974 and 1975.
SPORTS
By Dale Austin and Dale Austin,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 26, 1990
LAUREL -- Long after the Triple Crown races that trainer Carlos Garcia had eyed hopefully, Super Cholo finally won a race as a 3-year-old yesterday.The triumph came at Laurel Race Course in the $54,825 Annapolis Handicap, at the expense of heavily favored Chas' Whim, who ran fourth, and second choice Country Day, who struggled in next to last in a seven-horse race.With Marco Castaneda aboard, Super Cholo dropped back to fifth on the final turn, then rallied to win by a nose over Temper Time.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee and Marty McGee,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 1, 1991
LAUREL -- On a day when runaways seemed fashionable, Runaway Stream continued his dominance yesterday at Laurel Race Course.Nearly three hours before the gelding won the Walter Haight Handicap, a previously unraced filly captured the attention of horsemen and fans. Mixed Appeal won a maiden race by 18 lengths with frightening ease and in fast time, perhaps giving a glimpse of future stardom.In the Haight, uninitiated fans may have thought they were seeing a runaway. Learned Jake hit the wire nearly seven lengths ahead of Runaway Stream, but there was a problem: He had no jockey.
NEWS
By NANCY TAYLOR ROBSON and NANCY TAYLOR ROBSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 18, 2006
They're showstoppers: hayracks overflowing with chartreuse sweet potato vine (Ipomoea batatas `Marguerite'), lush Mandevilla, and velvety rich million bells (Calibrachoa); washtubs of hibiscus with saucer-sized flame and apricot flowers; celadon pots sprouting burgundy-speared Phormium, silver-green Helichrysum, and claret-colored petunias. Container gardens can punctuate a balcony, grace a kitchen door, and enhance an uninspired entrance with dramatic color and bloom. "Container gardens brighten up any space, shady or sunny," says landscapedesigner, Joanne Abukurah, owner of Jalands Landscape Design in Arlington, Va. "They can bring more plants to your house, especially if you have a smallgarden.
NEWS
By ABIGAIL TUCKER and ABIGAIL TUCKER,SUN REPORTER | March 29, 2006
The mercury is stalled near 40 degrees, but Anne Offermann is the very vision of spring as she picks her way through the parks of Mount Vernon Place in a pale lemon jacket so thin it's almost see-through, featherweight khakis and a wide-brimmed straw visor. Yet now, as the wind rakes frozen fingers through just-blossomed cherry trees, she barely shivers. Her sartorial strategy? "Long underwear," she says, hiking up a cuff to reveal an ankle armored in thick black fabric. Offermann is visiting from the harsh climate of Buffalo, N.Y., but even she is unsure how to dress for the atmospheric free-for-all that is Baltimore's early spring.
NEWS
By ERIKA NIEDOWSKI and ERIKA NIEDOWSKI,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 28, 2006
KIEV, Ukraine -- Less than a year and a half ago, Viktor A. Yushchenko became president of Ukraine in a peaceful revolution and declared the beginning of a new political era that seemed destined to take firm hold and influence Ukraine's neighbors. He has been proved right, even as democratic change has followed a course that Yushchenko and promoters of civil society didn't expect. On Sunday, Yushchenko's party placed third in the first parliamentary elections since he became president.
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 20, 2005
The weekend after Thanksgiving is more than a three-day stretch riddled with retail shopping chaos. For many, it's the time to gather the family for the annual trip through the rolling hills of Harford County's countryside to visit one of seven Christmas tree farms. Many tree-hunters prefer to cut their own, seeking to capture the tradition of an old-fashioned Christmas. But those who want the most popular variety - the Fraser fir - often must walk past the rows of homegrown evergreens and grab a pre-cut tree imported from North Carolina, the optimal region for growing Frasers.
BUSINESS
By JANET KIDD STEWART | November 28, 2004
OVERSPENDING, like overeating, seems inevitable at holiday time. We plan, we set limits. Then we trample all over them when the pressure is on to deliver a child's must-have toy or a luxury that tells our parents we made it after all. It's difficult to truly figure out how much is too much because it's so easy to put it on credit. Those "little" monthly payments can seem trivial compared with the joy a kid gets from a cool gift, but they come back to haunt you in the form of huge interest costs throughout the year.
NEWS
August 5, 2004
Charles William Whims Sr., a retired thoroughbred horse trainer and owner, died of complications from cancer July 29 at his daughter's North Baltimore home. He was 81. A resident of the Phoenix area of Baltimore County, he was born in nearby Sweet Air and was a graduate of the former George Washington Carver School in Towson. He served in the Army as a mail transportation clerk in the Pacific during World War II. According to a 1981 profile in Maryland Horse magazine, Mr. Whims worked for many years as an assistant to Billy Myers and Babe Saportas, well-known Maryland trainers.
NEWS
January 1, 1993
Well, look at you.You look mah-velous. And well you should. Uncle Sam just decided to call you Washington-Baltimore. Don't yewwww feel special?Maybe we shouldn't kid about such matters. Some area business leaders took very seriously the federal government's joining -- on paper -- of the Washington and Baltimore metropolitan statistical areas into a single hyper-region. The benefits could range from international corporations and retailers deciding to locate in this market because it's now the nation's fourth largest, to decisions on where to slather the federal budget butter.
NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 30, 2001
SHE DID IT on a whim. No one had visited her school to ask for donations. It wasn't an obligatory project for community service hours. It was a project that West Middle School pupil Brooke Richardson said she felt "tugs from the heart" to do. After months of collecting donations from fellow pupils, Carroll County teachers, lacrosse teammates, friends, neighbors and her church family, Brooke recently delivered four grocery carts and five boxes filled with...
NEWS
August 1, 2004
On July 29, 2004, CHARLES WILLIAM WHIMS, SR., of Phoenix, MD; beloved husband of the late Vyonne Eileen Whims; devoted father of Charles William, Jr., Phyllis, George, Phillip, Leslie and Andre. Also survived by seven grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, three daughters-in-law, one son-in-law and a host of other relatives and friends. Friends may call at the CHATMAN-HARRIS FUNERAL HOME, 5240 Reisterstown Road, Monday 12 to 8 P.M., where the family will receive friends Monday 6 to 8 P.M. Funeral Services will be held, at Mt. Zion AME Church, 12728 Manor Road, Long Green, MD, Tuesday.
NEWS
July 4, 2004
On July 2, 2004 VYONNE EILEEN WHIMS of Jacksonville, MD; beloved wife of Charles W. Whims, Sr.; loving mother of Charles, George, Phillip, Leslie, Andre, and Phyllis. Also survived by seven grandchildren, two great grandchildren, three daughters-in-law, one son-in-law and a host of other relatives and friends. Friends may call at the CHATMAN-HARRIS FUNERAL HOME, 5240-44 Reisterstown Road, on Tuesday 12 to 8 P.M. where the family will receive friends Tuesday 6 to 8 P.M. and Wednesday 11 A.M. with funeral services to follow at 11:30 A.M. Interment Dulaney Valley Cemetery.
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