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NEWS
April 11, 1993
Thomas P. Whelley Jr., retired chief of the Flood Control Branch of the Baltimore office of the Army Corps of Engineers, died Tuesday of heart failure in his sleep at his Edmondson Heights home.Mr. Whelley, who was 80 became a civilian employee with the Corps after World War II and remained there until he retired in 1973. After his retirement, he was inducted into the office's Civilian Employee Hall of Fame.Born in Syracuse, N.Y., he was reared in Utica, where he played on a high school championship football team in 1931.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
Six-year-old Rey Powell sat next to his father, nose pressed against the window on the MARC train Saturday as he headed from Union Station in Washington to Penn Station in Baltimore aboard one of the system's first weekend trains. The two planned to grab a taxi once they arrived for a visit to the National Aquarium — a father-and-son getaway for the boy's birthday. "We love trains, and it takes away the hassle of driving," said his father, Rey Powell of Gaithersburg. No one's sure how many weekend riders the MARC train will carry to and from Baltimore on its new, expanded Saturday and Sunday service, but Charm City marketing experts and transportation officials expect to collect on the state's $46 million venture in more places than just the fare box. Curators and event planners, sports stadium managers and real estate brokers say they anticipate that the new train service will enable them to tap into a bigger tourism market, connecting them to regional travelers and visitors flying into Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport seven days a week.
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BUSINESS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1999
The Downtown Partnership of Baltimore yesterday named former Baltimore Development Corp. executive Michele L. Whelley as executive vice president.She will serve as acting president of the nonprofit alliance of downtown business leaders during the absence of president and chief executive Laurie Schwartz, the partnership said.Mayor Martin O'Malley has appointed Schwartz deputy mayor of economic and neighborhood development.Whelley, who will assume her duties Jan. 1, was executive vice president and chief operating officer of the BDC from 1994 until April of this year.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2011
Justice has eluded Ronnell Doughty, perhaps even failed him. Hospitalized as a toddler with serious lead poisoning, he's never learned to read well, dropped out of school and has a hard time controlling his temper — tragic but all-too-common outcomes of this urban health scourge. But Doughty, now 21, has been repeatedly denied a shot at compensation for the lasting injury done him two decades ago. His family says in court papers that two lawyers mishandled the lawsuit on his behalf against the landlords of the East Baltimore rowhouse where he allegedly ingested toxic lead from flaking paint.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
Six-year-old Rey Powell sat next to his father, nose pressed against the window on the MARC train Saturday as he headed from Union Station in Washington to Penn Station in Baltimore aboard one of the system's first weekend trains. The two planned to grab a taxi once they arrived for a visit to the National Aquarium — a father-and-son getaway for the boy's birthday. "We love trains, and it takes away the hassle of driving," said his father, Rey Powell of Gaithersburg. No one's sure how many weekend riders the MARC train will carry to and from Baltimore on its new, expanded Saturday and Sunday service, but Charm City marketing experts and transportation officials expect to collect on the state's $46 million venture in more places than just the fare box. Curators and event planners, sports stadium managers and real estate brokers say they anticipate that the new train service will enable them to tap into a bigger tourism market, connecting them to regional travelers and visitors flying into Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport seven days a week.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2002
Baltimore will never be Paris, but a team being unveiled today to overhaul downtown's stark and desolate Center Plaza has such high hopes that it likens part of its design to the City of Light's famed Champs Elysees. Though it lacks an arch, Baltimore's version -- projected to cost $6 million to $7 million -- is envisioned as a block-long, bustling pedestrian boulevard with cafe tables, flowers, trees and park benches on the plaza's western edge. A giant lawn would fill most of the city-owned plaza, now largely paved and often empty.
NEWS
By ERIC SIEGEL and ERIC SIEGEL,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1995
Baltimore's top officials agreed yesterday to give financial breaks and payment deferrals worth several million dollars to baking magnate and businessman John Paterakis, after being told they were needed so that the first phase of the Inner Harbor East development near Little Italy can go forward.The Board of Estimates voted unanimously to provide two Paterakis development companies with $1.85 million in financial breaks, allowing them to forgo $850,000 in contributions to public improvements and $750,000 in payments for operating a marina.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2011
Justice has eluded Ronnell Doughty, perhaps even failed him. Hospitalized as a toddler with serious lead poisoning, he's never learned to read well, dropped out of school and has a hard time controlling his temper — tragic but all-too-common outcomes of this urban health scourge. But Doughty, now 21, has been repeatedly denied a shot at compensation for the lasting injury done him two decades ago. His family says in court papers that two lawyers mishandled the lawsuit on his behalf against the landlords of the East Baltimore rowhouse where he allegedly ingested toxic lead from flaking paint.
NEWS
By KATHERINE DUNN | September 27, 2006
Friends senior Katie Whelley received the school's prestigious C. Markland Kelly Award for leadership within the Quakers' sports program last season, despite missing field hockey season with a torn anterior cruciate ligament. A B-plus student who also plays lacrosse, she's considering a career in medical research and wants to play field hockey in college. She had a summer internship at Johns Hopkins hospital working in the hematology cancer research lab. Which is your favorite sport and why?
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2005
Michele L. Whelley, the former chief executive of the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore, will become a senior vice president of advisory services at Baltimore-based Colliers Pinkard as the commercial real estate firm expands its work in the fast-growing areas of higher education, life sciences and health care. The firm announced yesterday that Whelley, 51, who left the Downtown Partnership last summer to work as a consultant, will join Colliers Pinkard on Monday and work closely with President David Gillece in advising corporations and institutions such as hospitals, universities and biotech firms and developers.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2010
The Central Maryland Transportation Alliance, a 3-year-old advocacy group, has named a former head of the Downtown Partnership as its new leader and is charting an agenda with an emphasis on public transit improvements. The alliance, a privately funded organization of businesses and community groups, announced Wednesday the appointment of Michele L. Whelley, a longtime Baltimore resident who spent the past two years working in Connecticut, as president and chief executive officer.
NEWS
By KATHERINE DUNN | September 27, 2006
Friends senior Katie Whelley received the school's prestigious C. Markland Kelly Award for leadership within the Quakers' sports program last season, despite missing field hockey season with a torn anterior cruciate ligament. A B-plus student who also plays lacrosse, she's considering a career in medical research and wants to play field hockey in college. She had a summer internship at Johns Hopkins hospital working in the hematology cancer research lab. Which is your favorite sport and why?
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2005
Michele L. Whelley, the former chief executive of the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore, will become a senior vice president of advisory services at Baltimore-based Colliers Pinkard as the commercial real estate firm expands its work in the fast-growing areas of higher education, life sciences and health care. The firm announced yesterday that Whelley, 51, who left the Downtown Partnership last summer to work as a consultant, will join Colliers Pinkard on Monday and work closely with President David Gillece in advising corporations and institutions such as hospitals, universities and biotech firms and developers.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2004
Michele L. Whelley, president of Downtown Partnership of Baltimore, will resign her post July 1 to start a business consulting practice. Whelley, 50, came to the organization in January 2000 as executive vice president and interim president, and was named president six months later. "Increasingly over the past couple months, I've felt that there are other areas of interest that I'd like to dive into," Whelley said yesterday in announcing her planned departure. "What I think I have done best in is the strategizing and deal-making that leads to business development and project development."
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2002
Baltimore will never be Paris, but a team being unveiled today to overhaul downtown's stark and desolate Center Plaza has such high hopes that it likens part of its design to the City of Light's famed Champs Elysees. Though it lacks an arch, Baltimore's version -- projected to cost $6 million to $7 million -- is envisioned as a block-long, bustling pedestrian boulevard with cafe tables, flowers, trees and park benches on the plaza's western edge. A giant lawn would fill most of the city-owned plaza, now largely paved and often empty.
BUSINESS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1999
The Downtown Partnership of Baltimore yesterday named former Baltimore Development Corp. executive Michele L. Whelley as executive vice president.She will serve as acting president of the nonprofit alliance of downtown business leaders during the absence of president and chief executive Laurie Schwartz, the partnership said.Mayor Martin O'Malley has appointed Schwartz deputy mayor of economic and neighborhood development.Whelley, who will assume her duties Jan. 1, was executive vice president and chief operating officer of the BDC from 1994 until April of this year.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2010
The Central Maryland Transportation Alliance, a 3-year-old advocacy group, has named a former head of the Downtown Partnership as its new leader and is charting an agenda with an emphasis on public transit improvements. The alliance, a privately funded organization of businesses and community groups, announced Wednesday the appointment of Michele L. Whelley, a longtime Baltimore resident who spent the past two years working in Connecticut, as president and chief executive officer.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2004
Michele L. Whelley, president of Downtown Partnership of Baltimore, will resign her post July 1 to start a business consulting practice. Whelley, 50, came to the organization in January 2000 as executive vice president and interim president, and was named president six months later. "Increasingly over the past couple months, I've felt that there are other areas of interest that I'd like to dive into," Whelley said yesterday in announcing her planned departure. "What I think I have done best in is the strategizing and deal-making that leads to business development and project development."
NEWS
By ERIC SIEGEL and ERIC SIEGEL,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1995
Baltimore's top officials agreed yesterday to give financial breaks and payment deferrals worth several million dollars to baking magnate and businessman John Paterakis, after being told they were needed so that the first phase of the Inner Harbor East development near Little Italy can go forward.The Board of Estimates voted unanimously to provide two Paterakis development companies with $1.85 million in financial breaks, allowing them to forgo $850,000 in contributions to public improvements and $750,000 in payments for operating a marina.
NEWS
April 11, 1993
Thomas P. Whelley Jr., retired chief of the Flood Control Branch of the Baltimore office of the Army Corps of Engineers, died Tuesday of heart failure in his sleep at his Edmondson Heights home.Mr. Whelley, who was 80 became a civilian employee with the Corps after World War II and remained there until he retired in 1973. After his retirement, he was inducted into the office's Civilian Employee Hall of Fame.Born in Syracuse, N.Y., he was reared in Utica, where he played on a high school championship football team in 1931.
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