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NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | January 2, 1991
It's been four months since Morgan State University Professor Marilynn J. Phillips told the Maryland Human Relations Commission that the County Arts Council discriminated against people who use wheelchairs.And in those four months, Phillips says, the complaint has amounted to nothing."These things always seem to get bogged down in a lot of foot dragging," said the 46-year-old Harvey Gummel Road resident.Phillipsfiled her complaint -- which says 87 percent of all events scheduledby the County Arts Council between April and December of last year were inaccessible to wheelchair users -- on Aug. 23.In the complaint, Phillips said only four of the 30 Arts Council events scheduled between April and December were accessible to wheelchair users.
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BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
Baltimore's oldest cab company and the Maryland Transit Administration are updating their fleets for wheelchair-using customers, replacing small buses and minivans with an SUV-like vehicle that provides a smoother, more civilized ride. The MV-1 is designed specifically to transport disabled passengers and already is in use in cities such as Pittsburgh, Chicago and Dallas. Built in Indiana, it is the only production vehicle that meets Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines. Yellow Cab and sister company 1010 Sedan purchased 10 MV-1s and began using them this week.
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NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2002
A Baltimore woman sued the sleek, new Redwood Trust nightclub yesterday, saying the three-floor dance club and sushi bar discriminates against wheelchair users because there is no elevator and the one handicapped-accessible entrance is locked during business hours. In her lawsuit, Carolee Laird noted that the Redwood's owners spent more than $2.5 million to turn a former bank building at the corner of Calvert and Redwood streets into an ornate, modern club. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, argued the renovated building should fully comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act. "I was definitely impressed with what they had done with the nightclub," said Laird, 27, who has spina bifida and is unable to walk.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2011
The problem: An old street light on West North Avenue blocks the sidewalk for wheelchair users. The backstory: Reader Rick Dorr went to great lengths to document the problems at the intersection of West North Avenue and Mount Royal Avenue, on the border of Bolton Hill and Reservoir Hill. He took measurements, bought a disposable camera, drew diagrams on the printed images and mailed them to Watchdog. Primarily, Dorr was concerned about a rusty street light pole on the southwest corner of the intersection, across from the Interstate 83 ramps.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | July 7, 1991
The Maryland Commission on Human Relations has found that Western Maryland College, Westminster High School and a Westminster health clubdiscriminate against wheelchair users.In response to complaints filed over the last year by Hampstead professor Marilyn J. Phillips, the commission issued five separate findings against the college, high school and Leisure Health Spa. Those findings say MCHR has probablecause to believe discrimination against wheelchair users exists."I want to have anti-discrimination laws enforced," Phillips, 47,said from her Harvey Gummell Road log home.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | January 10, 1993
Wheelchair users will be able to attend Westminster City Council's meeting tomorrow night in the new first-floor council chambers of City Hall -- if they can get into the building.City officials say wheelchair users should be able to enter through the door that faces City Hall Drive -- with help.But they wouldn't want to try to use a restroom during the evening.Council meetings return to City Hall tomorrow night despite one council member's misgivings about resuming the sessions in a building where renovations to meet new accessibility standards for the disabled have not yet begun.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | October 10, 1993
Q: My wife is confined to a wheelchair. We would like to take a cruise in the Caribbean. Which lines can accommodate us?A: A score of ships that will be calling at Caribbean and the Bahamian ports this season have cabins especially designed for the wheelchair user. But just how equipped can vary markedly from ship to ship, and even vessels with such cabins have only a handful of them.It's a good idea to check with your local travel agency or a cruise line to be sure that your needs can be met. Cabins known in the industry as "dedicated," meaning they are specially designed, are best suited for wheelchair users.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | June 29, 1992
SANTA CRUZ, Calif. -- Mix a little sun-tan lotion with a little ingenuity, and summer no longer has to mean endless frustration for people in wheelchairs.A new invention -- the first of its kind on the West Coast -- is hitting Santa Cruz beaches this summer, allowing wheelchair users to roll across sands that once stopped them in their tracks.The Surf Chair is no run-of-the-mill wheelchair. With its inflatable orange wheels, white plastic frame and sun umbrella, the contraption looks more a giant Fisher-Price toy than the hippest new development in disabled-access equipment.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | January 31, 1993
Q: Of the chateaux in the Loire Valley, are some accessible for wheelchair users?A: Here are five chateaux that provide entry to the ground floor for visitors using wheelchairs. In all of them, access to upper floors is only by stairway.* Chateau de Chenonceau has a ramp that allows wheelchair access to the ground floor. If a wheelchair user arrives by car, the staff will allow the vehicle through the gate to park closer to the chateau than is normally allowed and may provide someone to push the wheelchair.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | August 26, 1994
As Marilynn J. Phillips sees it, the party of inclusion is excluding her -- and other wheelchair users -- from its county campaign headquarters in Westminster.For the second election year in a row, the county's Democratic Central Committee has leased a Main Street site that is inaccessible to wheelchair users, the Hampstead disabilities-rights activist claimed in complaints filed this week with the U.S. Department of Justice and the Maryland Human Relations Commission."I believe I have been discriminated against," Ms. Phillips said in the complaints.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 16, 2008
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration is about to propose far-reaching new rules that would give people with disabilities greater access to tens of thousands of courtrooms, swimming pools, golf courses, stadiums, theaters, hotels and retail stores. The proposal would substantially update and rewrite federal standards for enforcement of the Americans With Disabilities Act, a landmark civil rights law passed with bipartisan support in 1990. The new rules would set more stringent requirements in many areas and address some issues for the first time, in an effort to meet the needs of an aging population and growing numbers of disabled war veterans.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | May 27, 2007
While gardening nourishes the soul, it can challenge the body, especially those gardeners who cannot walk, reach or bend freely. The first thing to consider in designing a garden for those who use a wheelchair is access. Paths or walkways both to and in the garden must be wide enough and made of a material that allows easy movement of the wheelchair. "It must be smooth and level [side to side] with no steep slopes," says Jack Carman, a landscape architect in Medford, N.J., who designs therapeutic gardens for senior communities.
NEWS
By NICOLE FULLER and NICOLE FULLER,SUN REPORTER | April 18, 2006
A federal judge in Baltimore granted a preliminary injunction yesterday that will allow a Howard County athlete who uses a wheelchair to compete in track alongside nondisabled competitors. The Maryland Disability Law Center filed suit on behalf of Tatyana McFadden, 16, a sophomore at Atholton High School and winner of two medals at the 2004 Paralympics in Athens, Greece. McFadden had been denied the chance to race alongside non-wheelchair users and to have her choice of competitive events.
TRAVEL
By NEW YORK TIMES | January 8, 2006
I am in my 80s, and am limited as to how much walking I am able to do. Are there any tours geared to people with limitations? People who are mobile but have trouble walking fast or for long distances, often referred to as slow walkers, have many alternatives in and out of the United States. Access-Able Travel Source, accessable.com, provides practical information about travel for people with all types of disabilities. Carol Randall, who uses a wheelchair or scooter because of multiple sclerosis, organized the Web site with her husband, Bill, as a place to store what they have discovered either from their own journeys or from other travelers.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2005
The small trash can fire at Westminster High in December was extinguished in a matter of minutes, but the debates it sparked have persisted for months. In the weeks after someone set the fire in the second-floor boys' restroom of the three-story building, parents complained about the school's emergency evacuation policy, which requires any student unable to walk out on his or her own to be moved to the nearest smoke-free stairwell, where the child and an adult are expected to wait for firefighters.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2002
Aspiring law students knew they would get to study in a brand new building this fall if they got into the University of Maryland School of Law. That's one reason applications to the downtown Baltimore school increased 85 percent last year - the largest jump in the country. But no one expected this. The building that opened to students this month is a $54 million palace wired with enough technology to run a small movie studio. The floor is made of slate from Norwegian fjords, and everything else, it seems, is made of cherry wood, right down to the London-style telephone booths in the lounge.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 16, 2008
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration is about to propose far-reaching new rules that would give people with disabilities greater access to tens of thousands of courtrooms, swimming pools, golf courses, stadiums, theaters, hotels and retail stores. The proposal would substantially update and rewrite federal standards for enforcement of the Americans With Disabilities Act, a landmark civil rights law passed with bipartisan support in 1990. The new rules would set more stringent requirements in many areas and address some issues for the first time, in an effort to meet the needs of an aging population and growing numbers of disabled war veterans.
TRAVEL
By NEW YORK TIMES | January 8, 2006
I am in my 80s, and am limited as to how much walking I am able to do. Are there any tours geared to people with limitations? People who are mobile but have trouble walking fast or for long distances, often referred to as slow walkers, have many alternatives in and out of the United States. Access-Able Travel Source, accessable.com, provides practical information about travel for people with all types of disabilities. Carol Randall, who uses a wheelchair or scooter because of multiple sclerosis, organized the Web site with her husband, Bill, as a place to store what they have discovered either from their own journeys or from other travelers.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2002
A decade of efforts translated into reality last night as the Howard County Council faced the public for the first time in handicapped-accessible chambers. Council members heard testimony on topics as varied as school construction and affordable housing, but the session was overshadowed by the transformation of the county's premier meeting space. The 26-year-old Banneker Room had been designed like a theater-in-the-round, with stairs leading into a pit for testimony. Now the floor is flat, with spaces reserved for people in wheelchairs.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2002
A Baltimore woman sued the sleek, new Redwood Trust nightclub yesterday, saying the three-floor dance club and sushi bar discriminates against wheelchair users because there is no elevator and the one handicapped-accessible entrance is locked during business hours. In her lawsuit, Carolee Laird noted that the Redwood's owners spent more than $2.5 million to turn a former bank building at the corner of Calvert and Redwood streets into an ornate, modern club. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, argued the renovated building should fully comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act. "I was definitely impressed with what they had done with the nightclub," said Laird, 27, who has spina bifida and is unable to walk.
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