Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWheelchair Ramp
IN THE NEWS

Wheelchair Ramp

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1996
For most of America, Tickle Me Elmo is the must-have toy of Christmas 1996, its street value bid ever upward by frenzied parents who can't find it in the stores but absolutely must have it under that tree by Wednesday morning.But for the Diggs family of Pikesville, Tickle Me Elmo is something else altogether -- a furry red toy that holds the promise of a new independence for 12-year-old Rodney, stricken since birth by a devastating soft-bone disease.While millions of Americans are scheming to get their hands on a scarce Elmo, the Diggses are hoping to sell theirs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 24, 2013
I was saddened to read about the death of Lary Lewman. His obituaries said he was known for having been "Pete the Pirate" on Baltimore TV in the 1960s and later as a successful voice-over artist on political commercials. I will remember him for an act of great kindness. Thirteen years ago, I was looking for someone to build a wheelchair ramp for a friend, a young Salvadoran immigrant who had been shot in Long Reach during a robbery attempt and left paralyzed. The young man wanted to keep working but couldn't leave his family's house unless someone carried him down the steps.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2001
For transportation engineer Robert Reuter, a lifelong Northeast Baltimore resident who needs a wheelchair to get around, a moment of resolve came at the courthouse buzzer. At the east-side state district courthouse in 1997, Reuter pressed the buzzer at the side entrance on Harford Road. And waited -- and waited -- in the rain, until a bailiff unlocked the door and let him in, he said. "Someone gave me hell for banging on the door," he said of his trip to rental housing court on an escrow matter.
NEWS
October 4, 2012
Eric Lee misses the point of Question 6 in his commentary on same-sex marriage ("Protecting marriage isn't about hate," Oct. 2). His analogy of the vegetarian restaurant is particularly off the mark. If his favorite vegetarian restaurant starts serving hamburgers, he is under no obligation to buy or eat them. A more fit analogy for Question 6 would be a restaurant in 1960 allowing a black couple to sit at a table with white people. Or, 10 years ago, a restaurant moving your favorite table and adding a wheelchair ramp to allow a disabled person the same right to share a meal.
NEWS
October 4, 2012
Eric Lee misses the point of Question 6 in his commentary on same-sex marriage ("Protecting marriage isn't about hate," Oct. 2). His analogy of the vegetarian restaurant is particularly off the mark. If his favorite vegetarian restaurant starts serving hamburgers, he is under no obligation to buy or eat them. A more fit analogy for Question 6 would be a restaurant in 1960 allowing a black couple to sit at a table with white people. Or, 10 years ago, a restaurant moving your favorite table and adding a wheelchair ramp to allow a disabled person the same right to share a meal.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2002
In a case pitting architectural aesthetics against handicapped accessibility, a federal judge has ruled that Bank of America is not legally required to add a wheelchair ramp or make other structural changes to one of Baltimore's most prominent buildings. Judge Marvin J. Garbis said that costly renovations needed to provide better accommodations for handicapped people at the 1929 art deco skyscraper at 10 Light St. would amount to "aesthetic destruction." He ruled that the historic building, while lacking in handicapped accessibility options, meets Americans with Disabilities Act minimum requirements.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | April 27, 1997
Christmas came early yesterday -- in April -- for a Baltimore Highlands couple who got a free wheelchair ramp through a fix-up program that matches volunteers with needy families."
NEWS
July 24, 2013
I was saddened to read about the death of Lary Lewman. His obituaries said he was known for having been "Pete the Pirate" on Baltimore TV in the 1960s and later as a successful voice-over artist on political commercials. I will remember him for an act of great kindness. Thirteen years ago, I was looking for someone to build a wheelchair ramp for a friend, a young Salvadoran immigrant who had been shot in Long Reach during a robbery attempt and left paralyzed. The young man wanted to keep working but couldn't leave his family's house unless someone carried him down the steps.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2001
With its shiny golden spire, the 1929 art deco skyscraper at 10 Light St. is considered one of the most prominent peaks in Baltimore's skyline. But 34 floors below, it is the building's ornate entryways that have focused attention on the subtle tensions between preserving historic places and ensuring that they are handicapped accessible. A federal judge finished hearing evidence yesterday in a case in which a Bank of America customer contends that the banking giant put preservation ahead of access at the branch offices in the Light Street building - and violated the decade-old Americans with Disabilities Act - by failing to add a wheelchair ramp or make other structural changes.
NEWS
By A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 28, 2001
The state commission that monitors rights for the disabled has filed charges with a state administrative agency saying that the Eastern District Courthouse building on North Avenue in Baltimore violates state codes because it's inaccessible to wheelchairs. The Maryland Commission on Human Relations wants state officials to build a ramp for wheelchair use at the building at 1400 E. North Ave. The commission's complaint has been approved for a public hearing by the Office of Administrative Hearings.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2002
In a case pitting architectural aesthetics against handicapped accessibility, a federal judge has ruled that Bank of America is not legally required to add a wheelchair ramp or make other structural changes to one of Baltimore's most prominent buildings. Judge Marvin J. Garbis said that costly renovations needed to provide better accommodations for handicapped people at the 1929 art deco skyscraper at 10 Light St. would amount to "aesthetic destruction." He ruled that the historic building, while lacking in handicapped accessibility options, meets Americans with Disabilities Act minimum requirements.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2001
For transportation engineer Robert Reuter, a lifelong Northeast Baltimore resident who needs a wheelchair to get around, a moment of resolve came at the courthouse buzzer. At the east-side state district courthouse in 1997, Reuter pressed the buzzer at the side entrance on Harford Road. And waited -- and waited -- in the rain, until a bailiff unlocked the door and let him in, he said. "Someone gave me hell for banging on the door," he said of his trip to rental housing court on an escrow matter.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2001
With its shiny golden spire, the 1929 art deco skyscraper at 10 Light St. is considered one of the most prominent peaks in Baltimore's skyline. But 34 floors below, it is the building's ornate entryways that have focused attention on the subtle tensions between preserving historic places and ensuring that they are handicapped accessible. A federal judge finished hearing evidence yesterday in a case in which a Bank of America customer contends that the banking giant put preservation ahead of access at the branch offices in the Light Street building - and violated the decade-old Americans with Disabilities Act - by failing to add a wheelchair ramp or make other structural changes.
NEWS
By A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 28, 2001
The state commission that monitors rights for the disabled has filed charges with a state administrative agency saying that the Eastern District Courthouse building on North Avenue in Baltimore violates state codes because it's inaccessible to wheelchairs. The Maryland Commission on Human Relations wants state officials to build a ramp for wheelchair use at the building at 1400 E. North Ave. The commission's complaint has been approved for a public hearing by the Office of Administrative Hearings.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1998
It broke Wendyln McKinney's heart knowing that her son, Diello Harris, would have to sit outside waiting for neighbors to lift him and his wheelchair into the house and out of the freezing snow or pouring rain.Before she died in February, McKinney had tried for three years to get a ramp at her East Baltimore rowhouse so Diello, who has muscular dystrophy, could come and go as he pleased.Thanks to faculty and staff at Patterson High School, where Diello is an 11th-grader, one of McKinney's lingering wishes has been realized.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | April 27, 1997
Christmas came early yesterday -- in April -- for a Baltimore Highlands couple who got a free wheelchair ramp through a fix-up program that matches volunteers with needy families."
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1998
It broke Wendyln McKinney's heart knowing that her son, Diello Harris, would have to sit outside waiting for neighbors to lift him and his wheelchair into the house and out of the freezing snow or pouring rain.Before she died in February, McKinney had tried for three years to get a ramp at her East Baltimore rowhouse so Diello, who has muscular dystrophy, could come and go as he pleased.Thanks to faculty and staff at Patterson High School, where Diello is an 11th-grader, one of McKinney's lingering wishes has been realized.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1996
Christmas may not come until tomorrow, but Rodney Diggs already knows what present he's getting.Thanks to dozens of people who responded to an article in yesterday's Sun, 12-year-old Rodney, who since birth has been stricken with a soft-bone disease, will get a ramp for his wheelchair. Callers to his Pikesville home offered donations of money, material, labor and ramps so that Rodney would be able to keep the Tickle Me Elmo doll his 64-year-old grandparents were offering for sale to pay for a ramp.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1996
Christmas may not come until tomorrow, but Rodney Diggs already knows what present he's getting.Thanks to dozens of people who responded to an article in yesterday's Sun, 12-year-old Rodney, who since birth has been stricken with a soft-bone disease, will get a ramp for his wheelchair. Callers to his Pikesville home offered donations of money, material, labor and ramps so that Rodney would be able to keep the Tickle Me Elmo doll his 64-year-old grandparents were offering for sale to pay for a ramp.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1996
For most of America, Tickle Me Elmo is the must-have toy of Christmas 1996, its street value bid ever upward by frenzied parents who can't find it in the stores but absolutely must have it under that tree by Wednesday morning.But for the Diggs family of Pikesville, Tickle Me Elmo is something else altogether -- a furry red toy that holds the promise of a new independence for 12-year-old Rodney, stricken since birth by a devastating soft-bone disease.While millions of Americans are scheming to get their hands on a scarce Elmo, the Diggses are hoping to sell theirs.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.