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NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2012
A man in a wheelchair was struck by a subway train at Lexington Market station Wednesday afternoon, closing the station while rescue workers freed him. Albert David Jagd,46, was in the hospital Wednesday night being treated for injuries that were not considered life threatening, said Terry Owens, spokesman for the Maryland Transit Administration. The accident happened at 3:05, when an eastbound train approached the station and could not stop in time. The man ended up under the train, Owens said.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
Two men accused of stabbing a third in an elevator at the Shot Tower metro station this week were arrested Friday after an informant helped police identify them from surveillance images, the Maryland Transit Administration said. The men, both 25, were apprehended with the victim's property in downtown Baltimore about noon, two hours after the informant came forward with information, said Paul Shepard, a MTA spokesman. Police had first released the surveillance images on Thursday.
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NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2011
The problem: An old street light on West North Avenue blocks the sidewalk for wheelchair users. The backstory: Reader Rick Dorr went to great lengths to document the problems at the intersection of West North Avenue and Mount Royal Avenue, on the border of Bolton Hill and Reservoir Hill. He took measurements, bought a disposable camera, drew diagrams on the printed images and mailed them to Watchdog. Primarily, Dorr was concerned about a rusty street light pole on the southwest corner of the intersection, across from the Interstate 83 ramps.
SPORTS
David Selig and The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
After winning the 139th Preakness on Saturday, California Chrome co-owner Steve Coburn went out of his way to praise the hospitality he received while in Baltimore this week. But he also made some pointed remarks about the way his group was treated two weeks earlier at Churchill Downs for the Kentucky Derby. While he wouldn't go into great detail, he said the treatment there factored in his co-owner Perry Martin's decision not to attend the Preakness. “The hospitality we received at Churchill Downs wasn't very good, and Perry Martin, he decided that he and his family were going to watch the race some [other]
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
Owning a cane, wheelchair or walker is a little bit like owning a car, said Brad Barnhart, a physical therapist at North Oaks, a senior living community in Pikesville. Skip maintenance, and it could lead to unsafe conditions. Barnhart, with more than 25 years of experience in senior living settings, provides some tips on keeping medical devices in good shape. How often do you see patients who aren't maintaining their cane, walker, wheelchair or other medical device, and how big of a problem is it?
NEWS
April 25, 1997
Pub Date: 4/25/97
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
A 56-year-old woman in a wheelchair was struck by a van as its elderly driver made a right hand turn from an Annapolis parking lot Thursday afternoon, police said. Annapolis Police said Marla Marie McFarland of the 700 block of Glenwood St. was struck by the 72-year-old man driving a work van as he tried to turn right onto the 900 block of West St. just before 1 p.m. Police have not released the name of the driver. McFarland was transported to Anne Arundel Medical Center, where she was pronounced dead.
NEWS
By Sarah Tan, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2010
It all started as a search for a new wheelchair ramp. Every time Tavonia Randall needed to take her mother out of the house, she had to push her in a wheelchair down a steep ramp at the back of their Park Heights rowhouse. The maneuver was dangerous for both Randall and her mother, Gladys Cole, 73. Once they left the house that they share, "We would stay out all day," Randall said. "That ramp was a killer." Randall stumbled across the website of Rebuilding Together Baltimore as she sought a new ramp, and to her surprise, the nonprofit agreed to outfit her home not only with a wheelchair lift, but also with many other wheelchair-accessible features.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2012
A man crossing a street in Northeast Baltimore was struck and killed by a pickup Wednesday evening, police said. Baltimore resident Joice Price, 82, was using his wheelchair to cross the 5500 block of Bel Air Road about 6:15 p.m. when he was struck by a Dodge Dakota, said police spokesman Detective Jeremy Silbert. Price was taken to Johns Hopkins Hospital where he died later that evening, Silbert said. The driver of the truck that hit Price stayed on the scene, he said. No charges have been filed against the driver.
NEWS
By Lyn Backe and Lyn Backe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 22, 1996
SOMEHOW in its fiber-optic trip from my home to The Sun computer last week, a minivan that had been an idea in my living room became a fact in my driveway, and I was fielding calls all week from friends who wanted to try it out.No such luck.Rather, the idea of the minivan has become the probability of a three-door hatchback, or even just trading vehicles with my husband, to give him better mileage on a long daily commute. I sure did like that minivan, though maybe I can drive it in my dreams.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
On Oct. 13, just before 9:15 a.m., Tatyana McFadden soared across the finish line at the Bank of America Chicago Marathon, just two seconds before the racer behind her, taking the top spot in the women's wheelchair competition and making history. McFadden, 24, an Atholton High School graduate who grew up in Clarksville, completed the marathon in 1 hour, 42 minutes and 35 seconds, about a three-minute improvement over her first-place times in the Boston and London marathons earlier this year.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | June 9, 2013
When you set out to push 3,000 miles across the country in a racing wheelchair, you expect a few challenges along the way. Ryan Chalmers had his share, that's for sure. Hands that blistered and cracked and turned the color of eggplant from punishing 70-mile days? Check. Hairpin turn on an eight-mile descent in the Rocky Mountains that nearly caused him to wipe out into the side of a tunnel? Check. Enraged bull on the side of a road in Illinois giving him the evil eye?
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
Owning a cane, wheelchair or walker is a little bit like owning a car, said Brad Barnhart, a physical therapist at North Oaks, a senior living community in Pikesville. Skip maintenance, and it could lead to unsafe conditions. Barnhart, with more than 25 years of experience in senior living settings, provides some tips on keeping medical devices in good shape. How often do you see patients who aren't maintaining their cane, walker, wheelchair or other medical device, and how big of a problem is it?
NEWS
April 21, 2013
Clarksville resident Tatyana McFadden won the women's wheelchair race in the London Marathon on Sunday, six days after her win in the Boston Marathon. "The race is definitely dedicated to Boston and we had huge support from London, which was amazing," McFadden said during the post-race news conference. "Just the support that we're getting around the world means a lot, especially back in Boston and to the athletes. " McFadden, whose 1:46.02 time was a record mark for London, won the Boston Marathon wheelchair event Monday.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2013
Last September, Van Brooks walked for the first time in eight years. A wobbly video, recorded on a smartphone and posted on Facebook, shows the lower body of an undeterrable young man. Legs violently shaking as he refuses to accept his initial diagnosis, Brooks clings to a walker while his weight is supported by a harness attached to the ceiling. Wearing white tube socks and a pair of Converse All Stars, Brooks slowly takes a small step forward. His left foot quivers as he strains to straighten it and complete the step.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
Baltimore's oldest cab company and the Maryland Transit Administration are updating their fleets for wheelchair-using customers, replacing small buses and minivans with an SUV-like vehicle that provides a smoother, more civilized ride. The MV-1 is designed specifically to transport disabled passengers and already is in use in cities such as Pittsburgh, Chicago and Dallas. Built in Indiana, it is the only production vehicle that meets Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines. Yellow Cab and sister company 1010 Sedan purchased 10 MV-1s and began using them this week.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | November 30, 1994
Gardner Lamont Delk was an inspiration, friends say -- a young man who was determined not to let a wheelchair define his life.A former United Fund poster boy and honor student at a city school for the disabled, Mr. Delk, 24, held a part-time clerical job with a mortgage company and was looking forward to college when he died Thursday at his Northwest Baltimore home of as-yet undetermined causes."
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 31, 1994
Send a little applause Dustin Gill's way tonight. When the kids from Centennial High School, in Howard County, line up for graduation this evening, Dustin will be there, against all odds.Send a few bouquets his way. Dustin's earned them. Got straight A's this year, learned a bunch of new computer skills. Went to the Farewell Assembly and the Senior Prom. Send a lot of admiration his way.When the kids assemble to march into the auditorium at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Dustin will roll in on his wheelchair.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
Charles Sandlass, a retired computer instruments worker who competed in numerous wheelchair sports competitions, died Wednesday at the Baltimore Washington Medical Center. Family members said no cause of death has been determined. He was 74 and lived in Essex. Born in Baltimore and raised in Highlandtown, he attended City College. Family members said he lost the use of his legs in an accident and later enrolled at the Joseph Bulova School of Watchmaking and Repair at Woodside in Queens, N.Y., where he lived in the 1960s and 1970s.
SPORTS
By Josh Vitale, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
A little more than five years ago, Ryan Henderson was nearing the peak of the sport he loved the most. He had won his race the night before, and he was just a day away from turning professional in motorcycle racing. But Henderson would never earn the professional status he coveted. Racing along the Seaford, Del., track's dirt surface, Henderson caught his foot in a hole and was ripped away from his bike. The fall broke his neck and back, paralyzing him from the chest down. He spent the next month in the hospital, and he said it took him four years of rehab to "rebuild myself.
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