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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 30, 2005
Transferring a show from TV to movie screens is a risky proposition. Spend too much time introducing characters and mythology and alienate the show's fans, who already know this stuff. But assume too much existing knowledge and people new to the franchise will leave theaters confused. Joss Whedon's Serenity faces just such a disadvantage - despite the cult following of its TV predecessor, Fox's 2002-2003 Firefly. It's a challenge it never entirely overcomes. Firefly, set 500 years in the future, follows a group of freedom fighters rebelling against an interplanetary federation known as the Alliance.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | February 13, 2009
Fox has a new and improved dream girl for the Friday-night fantasies of teenage boys, and she arrives tonight wearing a hey-look-me-over, super-short dress - the perfect model of female allure and submission. Her name is Echo, and she's at the heart of a dark new drama, Dollhouse, created by Joss Whedon, the Hollywood producer who gave us Buffy the Vampire Slayer, with Sarah Michelle Gellar, once upon a time. I liked Buffy, and I even learned to find messages of female emancipation in its imitators, like James Cameron's Dark Angel, featuring Jessica Alba.
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By John Coffren and John Coffren,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2002
The deal with Fox may have gone south, but creator Joss Whedon is determined that Firefly will rise again. From the start, Whedon creator of both Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel knew that his sci-fi/Western/Civil War space opera would be risky. And he was right. Last week, Fox announced it is canceling the show. The original two-hour pilot and final episode, Serenity, airs tomorrow at 8 p.m. Still, Whedon, like his feisty Capt. Malcolm Reynolds, refuses to consider surrender an option.
NEWS
By Kate Aurthur and Kate Aurthur,Los Angeles Times | March 11, 2007
When audiences last saw the cast of Buffy the Vampire Slayer in May 2003, Buffy and her friends had won a nearly apocalyptic battle between good and evil. Their hometown of Sunnydale, Calif. -- also known as the Hellmouth -- was a gargantuan pit as a result. After peering into the crater, Buffy, played by Sarah Michelle Gellar, walked away with a smile, and the television series came to a close after seven seasons. On March 14, Buffy the Vampire Slayer will return in comic book form. Joss Whedon, Buffy's creator, has written the first five issues and will oversee -- or "executive-produce," he says -- the whole arc as if it were a television show.
NEWS
By Kate Aurthur and Kate Aurthur,Los Angeles Times | March 11, 2007
When audiences last saw the cast of Buffy the Vampire Slayer in May 2003, Buffy and her friends had won a nearly apocalyptic battle between good and evil. Their hometown of Sunnydale, Calif. -- also known as the Hellmouth -- was a gargantuan pit as a result. After peering into the crater, Buffy, played by Sarah Michelle Gellar, walked away with a smile, and the television series came to a close after seven seasons. On March 14, Buffy the Vampire Slayer will return in comic book form. Joss Whedon, Buffy's creator, has written the first five issues and will oversee -- or "executive-produce," he says -- the whole arc as if it were a television show.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN ARTS STAFF | May 20, 2003
Buffy the Vampire Slayer has always been about empowerment, about giving power to those who deserve it and taking it from those who don't. Never has that theme been demonstrated more clearly than in tonight's series finale. Joss Whedon, who created Buffy and has ever been its most inventive (not to mention literate) muse, is back doing the writing, for the first time since the season opener. Aside from bringing an appropriate sense of closure to the series - he who creates, after all, should also be he who destroys - Whedon's return brings back the balance between humor and drama that's largely been missing this season.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 20, 2002
Think of Firefly as Gunsmoke in a spaceship, and you're halfway home in understanding what creator Joss Whedon is up to in this Fox drama he labels "sci-fi/western." He's playing with genres and creating a new mythology that isn't likely to grab viewers the way his Buffy the Vampire Slayer did but is nevertheless one of the more imaginative hours of the new season. The year is 2502, and a great civil war has just been fought in the galaxy with the Alliance, a totalitarian government aimed at unification of the planets, the winner.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 29, 2005
Serenity [Universal] $30 Canceled television series never really die - they find new lives in repeats on cable, syndication and DVD, and sometimes even are transformed into feature films, a la Star Trek and Police Squad! Firefly is the latest failed series to make the move from living rooms to theaters. Created by Joss Whedon (Buffy the Vampire Slayer), the sci-fi adventure premiered on Fox in 2002. Although reviews were generally positive and the series quickly developed a following, ratings weren't good enough to sustain renewal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | January 20, 2002
It's about time those of you who still think Buffy the Vampire Slayer is some silly kids' show woke up and smelled the coffee (or perhaps blood would be more appropriate). And the recently released DVD collection of the show's 12 first-season episodes is a good place to start the process. The episodes on Buffy the Vampire Slayer: The Complete First Season --beginning with "Welcome to the Hellmouth," in which the newly expelled Buffy moves to a new town, meets new friends and finds her slayer responsibilities never go away, and running through "Prophecy Girl," her final encounter with The Master, in which Buffy dies for the first (but not last)
FEATURES
By Geoff Boucher and Geoff Boucher,Los Angeles Times | February 6, 2007
Stephen King's The Dark Tower, a magnum opus about a haunted gunslinger on a quest for a mysterious spire, stretched out over 22 years, seven novels and 4,272 pages of eerie adventure. But here's the really spooky thing: King fans want more. Now they're about to get it, although King is taking his readers to a new place that might scare some off. The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger Born, the Marvel Comics series, launches this week, and more than 100 retailers are opening for midnight release parties.
FEATURES
By Geoff Boucher and Geoff Boucher,Los Angeles Times | February 6, 2007
Stephen King's The Dark Tower, a magnum opus about a haunted gunslinger on a quest for a mysterious spire, stretched out over 22 years, seven novels and 4,272 pages of eerie adventure. But here's the really spooky thing: King fans want more. Now they're about to get it, although King is taking his readers to a new place that might scare some off. The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger Born, the Marvel Comics series, launches this week, and more than 100 retailers are opening for midnight release parties.
FEATURES
By DAVID HILTBRAND and DAVID HILTBRAND,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 6, 2006
By almost any measure - exposure, esteem, money - writing for comic books is a big step down for authors who are enjoying success in TV, films or fiction. But try telling that to the big-name scribes - including horror-meister Stephen King, Joss Whedon (creator of TV's Buffy the Vampire Slayer) and writer/director Reggie Hudlin (House Party), now head of entertainment at BET - who are taking the plunge into the pulpy world of muscle-bound superheroes. They all think they've died and gone to heaven.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 29, 2005
Serenity [Universal] $30 Canceled television series never really die - they find new lives in repeats on cable, syndication and DVD, and sometimes even are transformed into feature films, a la Star Trek and Police Squad! Firefly is the latest failed series to make the move from living rooms to theaters. Created by Joss Whedon (Buffy the Vampire Slayer), the sci-fi adventure premiered on Fox in 2002. Although reviews were generally positive and the series quickly developed a following, ratings weren't good enough to sustain renewal.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 30, 2005
Transferring a show from TV to movie screens is a risky proposition. Spend too much time introducing characters and mythology and alienate the show's fans, who already know this stuff. But assume too much existing knowledge and people new to the franchise will leave theaters confused. Joss Whedon's Serenity faces just such a disadvantage - despite the cult following of its TV predecessor, Fox's 2002-2003 Firefly. It's a challenge it never entirely overcomes. Firefly, set 500 years in the future, follows a group of freedom fighters rebelling against an interplanetary federation known as the Alliance.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | September 23, 2005
Fall is when mainstream producers and directors, like high school and college kids, head back from the beach and prove that they can crack open the books. This is when they unleash the heavyweight projects designed to lure shell-shocked adults back to the theaters and -- who knows? -- maybe win over part of the dating crowd that might recognize an author from an English class. You can empty a small library by checking out the sources of this season's prestige releases. Just for starters there's Oliver Twist and Pride and Prejudice, David Auburn's Pulitzer Prize-winning play Proof, Truman Capote's In Cold Blood and Gerald Clarke's biography Capote, Steve Martin's Shopgirl, Jonathan Safran Foer's Everything Is Illuminated and Robert Penn Warren's All the King's Men. Next week's shoreline thriller, Into the Blue, starring Jessica Alba in a bikini, is the exception that proves the rule.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN ARTS STAFF | May 20, 2003
Buffy the Vampire Slayer has always been about empowerment, about giving power to those who deserve it and taking it from those who don't. Never has that theme been demonstrated more clearly than in tonight's series finale. Joss Whedon, who created Buffy and has ever been its most inventive (not to mention literate) muse, is back doing the writing, for the first time since the season opener. Aside from bringing an appropriate sense of closure to the series - he who creates, after all, should also be he who destroys - Whedon's return brings back the balance between humor and drama that's largely been missing this season.
FEATURES
By DAVID HILTBRAND and DAVID HILTBRAND,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 6, 2006
By almost any measure - exposure, esteem, money - writing for comic books is a big step down for authors who are enjoying success in TV, films or fiction. But try telling that to the big-name scribes - including horror-meister Stephen King, Joss Whedon (creator of TV's Buffy the Vampire Slayer) and writer/director Reggie Hudlin (House Party), now head of entertainment at BET - who are taking the plunge into the pulpy world of muscle-bound superheroes. They all think they've died and gone to heaven.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 5, 1999
Angel is sitting in a bar in downtown L.A., trying to drink away the Buffy blues. He's got 'em bad, and he's sounding sad."My story?" he says in the voice drenched in neon and noir. "It all started with a girl. She was a really, really pretty girl. I mean, her hair. Her hair was."Angel never quite finishes the sentence. Before he can take another sip, he's out in an alley behind the bar slugging it out with a couple of nasty-faced vampires, saving a girl with long blond hair from their drooling fangs -- a girl a lot like the one he left back in Sunnydale.
FEATURES
By John Coffren and John Coffren,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2002
The deal with Fox may have gone south, but creator Joss Whedon is determined that Firefly will rise again. From the start, Whedon creator of both Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel knew that his sci-fi/Western/Civil War space opera would be risky. And he was right. Last week, Fox announced it is canceling the show. The original two-hour pilot and final episode, Serenity, airs tomorrow at 8 p.m. Still, Whedon, like his feisty Capt. Malcolm Reynolds, refuses to consider surrender an option.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 20, 2002
Think of Firefly as Gunsmoke in a spaceship, and you're halfway home in understanding what creator Joss Whedon is up to in this Fox drama he labels "sci-fi/western." He's playing with genres and creating a new mythology that isn't likely to grab viewers the way his Buffy the Vampire Slayer did but is nevertheless one of the more imaginative hours of the new season. The year is 2502, and a great civil war has just been fought in the galaxy with the Alliance, a totalitarian government aimed at unification of the planets, the winner.
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