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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
Michael Phelps has yet another achievement for his resume -- his face is on the front of the Wheaties box -- again. Wheaties announced Thursday that Phelps and fellow OlympianMisty May-Treanorwould be featured on the coveted front of the cereal box. It will be the second time Phelps represents the "breakfast of champions. " He was on the box after the 2004 Olympics. After the 2008 Olympics, however, he appeared on a different cereal box -- Corn Flakes and Frosted Flakes. The limited-edition Wheaties box featuring Phelps will be available beginning in September.
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By Jon Fogg and The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
I'm old enough to remember that it was a big deal when athletes were chosen to grace the front of a Wheaties box, yet I've never eaten a flake of it. General Mills would like to change that. The company has unveiled a promotion that, for the first time in the 90-year history of Wheaties, will allow the public to choose who's going on the iconic orange carton. The selection of athletes and the methodology show how General Mills is skewing younger with this promotion, the Wheaties Next Challenge . Lacrosse, the fastest-growing sport at the college and high school levels, gets a nod -- Rob Pannell, a former Cornell All-American and now a star with Major League Lacrosse's New York Lizards, is one of the five athletes up for the vote.
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FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2004
Sure, the six Olympic gold medals were nice and his anointing in Athens as one of the greatest swimmers of all time wasn't hard to take, either. But now comes the ultimate accolade for Michael Phelps: He gets his mug on a box of Wheaties, the legendary "Breakfast of Champions." According to an announcement made by the cereal company yesterday in Athens, Phelps, the 19-year-old record-breaker from Rodgers Forge, will join two fellow gold medalists, gymnastics champion Carly Patterson and sprinter Justin Gatlin, on special-edition packages of Wheaties due out in mid-September.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
Michael Phelps has yet another achievement for his resume -- his face is on the front of the Wheaties box -- again. Wheaties announced Thursday that Phelps and fellow OlympianMisty May-Treanorwould be featured on the coveted front of the cereal box. It will be the second time Phelps represents the "breakfast of champions. " He was on the box after the 2004 Olympics. After the 2008 Olympics, however, he appeared on a different cereal box -- Corn Flakes and Frosted Flakes. The limited-edition Wheaties box featuring Phelps will be available beginning in September.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2002
PARK CITY, Utah - He talked about his haircut, and he talked about drugs. He made the room laugh and tried not to laugh back. At his first Olympic news conference, U.S. snowboarder Danny Kass was right at home. He's from the next generation of Olympic athletes, the breath of fresh air the International Olympic Committee was looking for when it made halfpipe and downhill snowboarding events at the last Winter Olympics. A gold-medal winner at the Winter X Games and the U.S. Open, Kass could easily come home with Olympic gold in the halfpipe.
SPORTS
By BRAD SNYDER and BRAD SNYDER,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1995
In Robert Urban's two-car garage in Sykesville, automobiles take a back seat to cereal boxes and soda bottles.Urban is not a grocer; he is a sports memorabilia dealer hoping to cash in on Cal Ripken.So are many other Baltimoreans, who are stockpiling Ripken Wheaties boxes, Coca-Cola bottles, baseballs, newspapers and programs. But, according to several dealers and avid Ripken collectors, most Streak Week souvenirs will not be moneymaking collectibles."It gives an opportunity for everybody to participate," said Bill Haelig, a longtime Ripken collector who lives near Reading, Pa. "As far as putting the kids through college, no way, it'll never happen."
NEWS
August 13, 1996
MARYLAND IS HOME to 14 national champions that did not compete in the 100th Olympiad. These champions are unlikely to ever get any fat endorsement contracts or appear on a box of Wheaties. Their cousins, in fact, may even become a box of Wheaties.We're referring to Maryland's big trees.While they may not have the notoriety of Timonium gold-medalist swimmer Beth Botsford, some of them are hard to miss.A red southern oak in Anne Arundel County's Galesville -- known as Mr. Mustache for the distinctive handlebar curves of its lower branches -- is 104 feet tall or equivalent to a 10-story building.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | January 29, 2007
Yes, it's true: Nick Markakis and Adam Loewen were roundly booed at Saturday night's Capitals game when they were shown on the video screen and identified as Orioles. A member of D.C. United, meanwhile, received a huge ovation. Maybe a few of the Nationals will attend a Blast game and fans can boo them. Better yet, don't tip the starting pitchers when they serve your popcorn and sodas. Another example of why people here will forever love Cal Ripken: He could have leaned forward in his seat behind a long table to have his photo taken with fans during his autograph sessions at the Baltimore Convention Center this weekend, but instead suggested that another line be created in an aisle where he could stand beside everyone, either shaking hands or putting an arm around them, and create a higher-quality keepsake.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | January 5, 1995
It never fails that the new flower catalog arrives the same day the garden hose freezes and splits.It's a Baltimore January, a time of dry, flaking skin and a variety of weather that persists about a month. It's awful but it's over soon.The season of dry, brittle weather has its compensations, well, sort of. Just look at the January sunsets. They are the loveliest of the year, with the western horizons bathed in perfect indigos and oranges.The moon is clear and defined. The stars and planets just shout out at you. Even the city night-time air smells of burning oak and ash in fireplaces and cast-iron stoves.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | April 21, 1995
The TV Repairman:Between them, ESPN and ESPN2 will have 17 hours of the NFL draft tomorrow (noon-10 p.m.) and Sunday (noon-7 p.m.) with no less than 15 people yammering at you from New York, eight team headquarters, Bristol, Conn., and maybe even commissioner Paul Tagliabue's garage.Everyone is fairly familiar with the first three dozen players chosen, if they've read any or listened, then its six rounds of taking the word of the folks who prepare the scouting reports. Many might argue with justification there's a slight case of overkill here.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | January 29, 2007
Yes, it's true: Nick Markakis and Adam Loewen were roundly booed at Saturday night's Capitals game when they were shown on the video screen and identified as Orioles. A member of D.C. United, meanwhile, received a huge ovation. Maybe a few of the Nationals will attend a Blast game and fans can boo them. Better yet, don't tip the starting pitchers when they serve your popcorn and sodas. Another example of why people here will forever love Cal Ripken: He could have leaned forward in his seat behind a long table to have his photo taken with fans during his autograph sessions at the Baltimore Convention Center this weekend, but instead suggested that another line be created in an aisle where he could stand beside everyone, either shaking hands or putting an arm around them, and create a higher-quality keepsake.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2004
Sure, the six Olympic gold medals were nice and his anointing in Athens as one of the greatest swimmers of all time wasn't hard to take, either. But now comes the ultimate accolade for Michael Phelps: He gets his mug on a box of Wheaties, the legendary "Breakfast of Champions." According to an announcement made by the cereal company yesterday in Athens, Phelps, the 19-year-old record-breaker from Rodgers Forge, will join two fellow gold medalists, gymnastics champion Carly Patterson and sprinter Justin Gatlin, on special-edition packages of Wheaties due out in mid-September.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2002
PARK CITY, Utah - He talked about his haircut, and he talked about drugs. He made the room laugh and tried not to laugh back. At his first Olympic news conference, U.S. snowboarder Danny Kass was right at home. He's from the next generation of Olympic athletes, the breath of fresh air the International Olympic Committee was looking for when it made halfpipe and downhill snowboarding events at the last Winter Olympics. A gold-medal winner at the Winter X Games and the U.S. Open, Kass could easily come home with Olympic gold in the halfpipe.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | June 25, 1998
Denny Brauer, a professional bass fisherman from Camdenton, Mo., has won plenty of big tournaments over the past 18 years, and last weekend he was a big winner again, even though he failed to make the cut in the $1 million Forrest Wood Open in Hartford, Conn.Brauer finished 12th in a field of 75 pros. But in the process he won the Wal-Mart FLW Tour Angler of the Year title and a position on a special-edition Wheaties box.Brauer, 49, will be the first pro angler featured on the cereal box, which, through the years, has showcased professional and Olympic stars.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,SUN COLUMNIST | February 23, 1998
NAGANO, Japan -- The curtain rose, and 15 members of the U.S. women's ice hockey team appeared on stage. Five others sat in the front row, unable to join their teammates in a ceremony honoring the entire gold-medal squad.Nothing could divide them, not after the roster was announced on Dec. 20, 1997, not during their four-month pre-Olympic tour, not after they reached Nagano.But the NCAA found a way.The players were at a hotel for the unveiling of a new Wheaties box celebrating their collective triumph.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | February 22, 1998
NO GOOD parent would willingly send a child to bed with an empty stomach. But start the school day without breakfast?It happens more than many of us would like to think. In some homes, especially in parts of Baltimore, the chief culprit is poverty. But in many others, the rat race is to blame.Shirley S. Kane, a food services and nutrition specialist for Baltimore City Public Schools, admits that even she sometimes skips breakfast, though nutrition is her job. Imagine how often that happens to families less aware of its importance, or less able to provide the food.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,SUN COLUMNIST | February 23, 1998
NAGANO, Japan -- The curtain rose, and 15 members of the U.S. women's ice hockey team appeared on stage. Five others sat in the front row, unable to join their teammates in a ceremony honoring the entire gold-medal squad.Nothing could divide them, not after the roster was announced on Dec. 20, 1997, not during their four-month pre-Olympic tour, not after they reached Nagano.But the NCAA found a way.The players were at a hotel for the unveiling of a new Wheaties box celebrating their collective triumph.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | February 22, 1998
NO GOOD parent would willingly send a child to bed with an empty stomach. But start the school day without breakfast?It happens more than many of us would like to think. In some homes, especially in parts of Baltimore, the chief culprit is poverty. But in many others, the rat race is to blame.Shirley S. Kane, a food services and nutrition specialist for Baltimore City Public Schools, admits that even she sometimes skips breakfast, though nutrition is her job. Imagine how often that happens to families less aware of its importance, or less able to provide the food.
NEWS
August 13, 1996
MARYLAND IS HOME to 14 national champions that did not compete in the 100th Olympiad. These champions are unlikely to ever get any fat endorsement contracts or appear on a box of Wheaties. Their cousins, in fact, may even become a box of Wheaties.We're referring to Maryland's big trees.While they may not have the notoriety of Timonium gold-medalist swimmer Beth Botsford, some of them are hard to miss.A red southern oak in Anne Arundel County's Galesville -- known as Mr. Mustache for the distinctive handlebar curves of its lower branches -- is 104 feet tall or equivalent to a 10-story building.
SPORTS
By BRAD SNYDER and BRAD SNYDER,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1995
In Robert Urban's two-car garage in Sykesville, automobiles take a back seat to cereal boxes and soda bottles.Urban is not a grocer; he is a sports memorabilia dealer hoping to cash in on Cal Ripken.So are many other Baltimoreans, who are stockpiling Ripken Wheaties boxes, Coca-Cola bottles, baseballs, newspapers and programs. But, according to several dealers and avid Ripken collectors, most Streak Week souvenirs will not be moneymaking collectibles."It gives an opportunity for everybody to participate," said Bill Haelig, a longtime Ripken collector who lives near Reading, Pa. "As far as putting the kids through college, no way, it'll never happen."
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