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NEWS
By Will Fesperman and The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
Washington College in Chestertown has named Jack Griswold, an investment executive, as the interim president of the college, according to a press release issued Monday. Griswold - an emeritus member and former chair of the college's board of visitors and governors - will replace current President Mitchell B. Reiss and serve until the school hires a new president. Reiss is leaving Chestertown to become the president and CEO of the Colonial Williamsburg foundation in Virginia. Griswold, a graduate of Princeton University and the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, works at Black Oak Associates, a property development and investment management company in Owings Mills.
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NEWS
By Will Fesperman and The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
Washington College in Chestertown has named Jack Griswold, an investment executive, as the interim president of the college, according to a press release issued Monday. Griswold - an emeritus member and former chair of the college's board of visitors and governors - will replace current President Mitchell B. Reiss and serve until the school hires a new president. Reiss is leaving Chestertown to become the president and CEO of the Colonial Williamsburg foundation in Virginia. Griswold, a graduate of Princeton University and the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, works at Black Oak Associates, a property development and investment management company in Owings Mills.
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NEWS
May 3, 2013
To the age-old question of how many conservatives does it take to screw in a light bulb, we now have a definitive answer: Just one, but it will take him weeks to chase down a vintage incandescent bulb because he won't touch an energy-efficient one. At least that's the obvious conclusion to draw from a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The study, put together by researchers from Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and Duke University's Fuqua School of Business, asked hundreds of people to pass judgment on light bulb options.
NEWS
May 3, 2013
To the age-old question of how many conservatives does it take to screw in a light bulb, we now have a definitive answer: Just one, but it will take him weeks to chase down a vintage incandescent bulb because he won't touch an energy-efficient one. At least that's the obvious conclusion to draw from a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The study, put together by researchers from Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and Duke University's Fuqua School of Business, asked hundreds of people to pass judgment on light bulb options.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2012
The emailed rejection came as no surprise to Bill Skibinski, though the Abingdon resident believed he was more than qualified for the entry-level job he'd applied for online. After spending two years seeking full-time work, Skibinski is convinced that the computerized screening systems most companies use to hire actually work against job candidates, no matter how qualified they are. "It is a frustrating and unfair process," said Skibinski, who is working part time as a contractor while completing a master's degree in environmental planning at Towson University.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2011
A year ago, James Franklin was heir to the throne. Maryland's animated offensive coordinator had a contract entitling him to $1 million if not elevated by the university to head coach by Jan. 2, 2012. But the landscape shifted beneath Franklin's feet. A new athletic director arrived who was no fan of such "coach-in-waiting" agreements. With the succession plan envisioned by former AD Debbie Yow in jeopardy, Franklin left to become Vanderbilt's head coach. As Maryland practiced to play No. 18 West Virginia at Byrd Stadium on Saturday, the rival programs stood as testaments that life — and particularly coaching succession plans — don't always go as planned.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2010
David Gertler knows that sometimes you can inspire young people with just one word — especially when it's uttered three times. The Ellicott City resident and Howard County Board of Education candidate says that when it's his turn to take the youngsters in his parent carpool to school, he always drops them off with the words his mother uttered to him as a child: "Learn, learn, learn. " He has learned how infectious the word can be. "One of the kids switched out of the car pool because her mom and dad moved, but I ran into her the other day, and it had been at least three years since I saw her, but she said, 'Mr. Gertler, learn, learn, learn,' " he said.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2010
The Johns Hopkins University is pitching a new Global MBA program to students around the world. Loyola University Maryland's business school is luring professionals still fresh in their careers to a new, intensive one-year MBA program. Even the Maryland Institute College of Art is getting down to business, offering students with a creative flair a chance to learn business principles in a new master's program developed for next spring. These programs have sprouted up at Baltimore colleges during one of the bleakest economic periods in decades.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2010
Courtney Tomchik picked up quite a few awards as she left Broadneck a month ago to get ready for a new lacrosse career at the University of Pennsylvania. The three-sport standout was named the Phoebe Kelly Broadneck Athlete of the Year after a first-team All-Metro lacrosse season, a second-team All-Metro field hockey season and an admirable debut on the indoor track team. US Lacrosse twice named her a regional All-American as well as an Academic All-American. Tomchik, 18, will polish off her high school career with an appearance at Saturday's Under Armour All-America Lacrosse Classic at Towson University.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | April 25, 2011
Apparently, one pretend investigation (into Obama's birth certificate) isn't enough for Donald Trump. He now claims he is "looking into" how President Barack Obama was accepted to Ivy League schools Columbia and Harvard despite being a "terrible" student.   "I heard he was a terrible student, terrible," Trump said today i n an interview with The Associated Press . "How does a bad student go to Columbia and then to Harvard? I'm thinking about it, I'm certainly looking into it. Let him show his records.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2012
The emailed rejection came as no surprise to Bill Skibinski, though the Abingdon resident believed he was more than qualified for the entry-level job he'd applied for online. After spending two years seeking full-time work, Skibinski is convinced that the computerized screening systems most companies use to hire actually work against job candidates, no matter how qualified they are. "It is a frustrating and unfair process," said Skibinski, who is working part time as a contractor while completing a master's degree in environmental planning at Towson University.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2011
A year ago, James Franklin was heir to the throne. Maryland's animated offensive coordinator had a contract entitling him to $1 million if not elevated by the university to head coach by Jan. 2, 2012. But the landscape shifted beneath Franklin's feet. A new athletic director arrived who was no fan of such "coach-in-waiting" agreements. With the succession plan envisioned by former AD Debbie Yow in jeopardy, Franklin left to become Vanderbilt's head coach. As Maryland practiced to play No. 18 West Virginia at Byrd Stadium on Saturday, the rival programs stood as testaments that life — and particularly coaching succession plans — don't always go as planned.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2010
David Gertler knows that sometimes you can inspire young people with just one word — especially when it's uttered three times. The Ellicott City resident and Howard County Board of Education candidate says that when it's his turn to take the youngsters in his parent carpool to school, he always drops them off with the words his mother uttered to him as a child: "Learn, learn, learn. " He has learned how infectious the word can be. "One of the kids switched out of the car pool because her mom and dad moved, but I ran into her the other day, and it had been at least three years since I saw her, but she said, 'Mr. Gertler, learn, learn, learn,' " he said.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2010
The Johns Hopkins University is pitching a new Global MBA program to students around the world. Loyola University Maryland's business school is luring professionals still fresh in their careers to a new, intensive one-year MBA program. Even the Maryland Institute College of Art is getting down to business, offering students with a creative flair a chance to learn business principles in a new master's program developed for next spring. These programs have sprouted up at Baltimore colleges during one of the bleakest economic periods in decades.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2010
Courtney Tomchik picked up quite a few awards as she left Broadneck a month ago to get ready for a new lacrosse career at the University of Pennsylvania. The three-sport standout was named the Phoebe Kelly Broadneck Athlete of the Year after a first-team All-Metro lacrosse season, a second-team All-Metro field hockey season and an admirable debut on the indoor track team. US Lacrosse twice named her a regional All-American as well as an Academic All-American. Tomchik, 18, will polish off her high school career with an appearance at Saturday's Under Armour All-America Lacrosse Classic at Towson University.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1997
Too much? The mega-salaries that some CEOs make may reflect poor corporate governance, according to researchers at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. The researchers say some board and ownership structures in companies seem to enable CEOs to influence directors in order to win compensation that is excessive for the company's size. They also say corporate governance tends to be weaker when one person is both CEO and chairman.Before you go: Fast Company magazine has some advice for high-tech business travelers: Be sure your office or home PC is set up so you can dial in from afar.
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