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By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | February 22, 2007
The colorful members of the Wham City art collective have one simple goal: To create fun art for their friends and themselves. "From there everything else is delicious icing," said musician and Wham City member Dan Deacon. "The hearty cake is made of my friends. Friends cake." The public can get a taste tomorrow night, when Wham City is at the Walters Art Museum's free Fridays at the Walters series. The event showcases the many sides of Wham City: film, music, theater and fashion. Wham City was originally the name of a space in the Station North Arts District where about five artists and musicians lived, Deacon said.
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By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
If a significant portion of the city's eccentric D.I.Y. music community put together a weekend camping trip, would you go?  The first-ever Fields Festival - which includes the Baltimore-centric lineup of Dan Deacon, Matmos, Flock of Dimes (Jenn Wasner of Wye Oak's solo act), Horse Lords, Zomes, Abdu Ali, Chiffon and more - will take place at Camp Ramblewood in Darlington on Aug. 22-24, the festival's organizers announced on Friday. Tickets go on sale Thursday. The first 50 tickets will cost $50 each, and subsequent advance tickets will cost $65. Admission at the gate will be $85. Tickets are for the entire weekend; there are no single-day passes.
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By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | December 14, 2008
Before the show began, lines of eager concertgoers snaked down the sidewalk outside the club. The crowd of more than 1,000 well-dressed hipsters poured into the space until there was barely room to move - let alone dance. The sold-out concert was the last stop of the hugely successful Baltimore Round Robin Tour, which generated a landslide of glowing press. Dozens of Baltimore musicians banded together and hit the road to showcase different corners of the city's music scene. And fans responded in force: From the stage, Baltimore musician Connor Kizer couldn't see the end of the crowd.
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By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
Ed Schrader's Music Beat, the Baltimore post-punk duo of Ed Schrader and Devlin Rice, has signed to Nashville's Infinity Cat Recordings, according to Schrader. The band signed a two-album deal last month, and the first release - titled "Party Jail" - will come out in the spring, the 34-year-old singer said over the phone on Wednesday. Infinity Cat - whose artists include Jeff the Brotherhood, Diarrhea Planet and more - first noticed the group last year when Schrader and Rice opened for another Baltimore group, Future Islands, in Boston, Schrader said.
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By SAM SESSA | August 23, 2007
Hometown -- Baltimore Current members --Jim Mengel, guitar; Matt Anderson, bass; Tim Ford, vocals; Mike Franklin, guitar; Dale Smith, keyboards; Garrett Adler, drums Founded in --2003 Style --psychedelic pop rock Influenced by --Pink Floyd, Radiohead, Placebo, Smashing Pumpkins Notable --Though the band just released a new EP, Stalin's New Haircut, it's been a part of the budding Station North Arts and Entertainment district for some time. With the studio Hour Haus as a base, it plays regularly in the area.
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By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | January 20, 2008
Baltimore-based filmmaker Jimmy Joe Roche packs explosive combinations of colors, shapes and textures into his work. A Wham City arts collective member and graduate student at the Maryland Institute College of Art, Roche is on a national tour, performing the surrealist video art and live music presentation Ultimate Reality. Roche is sharing a van with Avant-garde composer/performer Dan Deacon and five other Wham City members for the next week or so until he's due back in school. While on the road, Roche and Deacon began fleshing out an idea for a new film and video performance piece called Take It to the Max. They plan to enlist several other Wham City groups and tour Europe in July.
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By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2010
This weekend, Whartscape hits two milestones. The annual celebration of underground arts and culture marks its fifth year — and it won't be back for a sixth. After half a decade of sweaty lo-fi spaces and experimental bands, videos and art, this will be the last Whartscape, according to co-organizer Dan Deacon. "We've taken the idea of we want to do with Whartscape and brought it to a pretty good place," Deacon said. "We do it for the love of arranging the festival, and I still love doing it, but I don't want to repeat it. I don't want it to become an institution — something that just happens.
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By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
About six years ago, the Baltimore rock band Arbouretum played at a club in Chicago for an audience of almost no one. You could count the members of the crowd on one hand, singer/guitarist David Heumann recalled, but one of them happened to be Bettina Richards, the founder of indie record label Thrill Jockey. She liked what she heard. "There literally was nobody there but me," Richards said. "It was great. I totally was hooked. " Richards signed Arbouretum to Thrill Jockey.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
If a significant portion of the city's eccentric D.I.Y. music community put together a weekend camping trip, would you go?  The first-ever Fields Festival - which includes the Baltimore-centric lineup of Dan Deacon, Matmos, Flock of Dimes (Jenn Wasner of Wye Oak's solo act), Horse Lords, Zomes, Abdu Ali, Chiffon and more - will take place at Camp Ramblewood in Darlington on Aug. 22-24, the festival's organizers announced on Friday. Tickets go on sale Thursday. The first 50 tickets will cost $50 each, and subsequent advance tickets will cost $65. Admission at the gate will be $85. Tickets are for the entire weekend; there are no single-day passes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
Ed Schrader's Music Beat, the Baltimore post-punk duo of Ed Schrader and Devlin Rice, has signed to Nashville's Infinity Cat Recordings, according to Schrader. The band signed a two-album deal last month, and the first release - titled "Party Jail" - will come out in the spring, the 34-year-old singer said over the phone on Wednesday. Infinity Cat - whose artists include Jeff the Brotherhood, Diarrhea Planet and more - first noticed the group last year when Schrader and Rice opened for another Baltimore group, Future Islands, in Boston, Schrader said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
At last month's Academy of Country Music Awards, Brad Paisley performed his single, “Beat This Summer,” alongside John Mayer. The audience held up cell phones - the modern version of the lighter at concerts - that displayed bright, flashing colors that changed in time with the song. It was an eye-catching trick, and it wouldn't have been possible without Wham City. Yes, the same Wham City responsible for some of Baltimore's most wonderfully surreal music, comedy, theater, art and more since the mid-2000s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2013
The turning point for the Wham City Comedy Tour came at a gig in Buffalo, N.Y. And, in typical Wham City fashion, it took some unexpected chaos and quick improvisation to reach it. On Monday, the tour - which consists of six comedians from the city's experimental arts collective Wham City and a director, all traveling the Northeast and Midwest in a white van for about three weeks this month - played an arts gallery/performance space called the...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
About six years ago, the Baltimore rock band Arbouretum played at a club in Chicago for an audience of almost no one. You could count the members of the crowd on one hand, singer/guitarist David Heumann recalled, but one of them happened to be Bettina Richards, the founder of indie record label Thrill Jockey. She liked what she heard. "There literally was nobody there but me," Richards said. "It was great. I totally was hooked. " Richards signed Arbouretum to Thrill Jockey.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2012
This week is is lighter on marquee shows than last, when we had both BRUUUCE and Van Halen. We have Rye Rye and Real Estate, plus a Hunx and His Punx and Big Freedia in our regular round-up of the week's most notable concerts. Ticket prices do not reflect any additional surcharges and taxes.  On Monday , hardcore band Converge plays the Ottobar ($15). And the acid jazz band Incognito are at Rams Head on Stage in Annapolis ($35). On Tuesday , several members of Wham City perform at Whole Gallery as part of their new comedy tour, "the Wham City Educational Seminar.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2011
Golden West Cafe has a handful of good shows this week, but the highlight is easily Joe Lally and Zomes on Saturday. While Fugazi has been on an indefinite hiatus for over eight years now, Lally, the band's founding bassist, has released three solo albums; the latest, "Why Should I Get Used to It," was released in April. Elsewhere this week: Wham City Comedy, Height with Friends, and the Smokers Club tour, starring Method Man and Curren$y.  On Monday , Manchester Orchestra, an indie rock five-piece, perform at the 9:30 club, 815 V St. N.W., Washington.
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By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2011
Another day, another Wale concert. The Washington rapper, who just opened for Lupe Fiasco at Merriweather, and who'll perform at Morgan State's homecoming next month, announced a third regional date for this Fall. He'll perform at the Fillmore Silver Spring October 22. Tickets, at $31, go on sale Friday. Also doubling up on shows is Sting. This guy, who's out plugging a new 25th anniversary greatest hits collection, was scheduled to perform October 29 at DAR Constitution Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2011
Every morning for the past eight months, Nicole Mazarakis wakes up, rolls out of bed and puts on music. Instead of turning on an iPod or playing a CD, Mazarakis pops a cassette into the old tape deck in her bedroom. She likes classical tapes from composers like Mozart and Haydn, but lately she's been listening to a new cassette by the enigmatic Baltimore singer/songwriter Daniel Higgs. "It's a really nice thing to wake up to in the morning," she said. "If you only have 30 minutes to get out of the house, it's not really that convenient to put a record on — you've got to flip it. Cassettes are great for me. " This might be the age of iPods and now iPhones, but the lowly cassette tape — long abandoned by the average listener — is making a small yet fervent comeback, fueled by a devoted base of indie musicians and fans.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
At last month's Academy of Country Music Awards, Brad Paisley performed his single, “Beat This Summer,” alongside John Mayer. The audience held up cell phones - the modern version of the lighter at concerts - that displayed bright, flashing colors that changed in time with the song. It was an eye-catching trick, and it wouldn't have been possible without Wham City. Yes, the same Wham City responsible for some of Baltimore's most wonderfully surreal music, comedy, theater, art and more since the mid-2000s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2011
Every morning for the past eight months, Nicole Mazarakis wakes up, rolls out of bed and puts on music. Instead of turning on an iPod or playing a CD, Mazarakis pops a cassette into the old tape deck in her bedroom. She likes classical tapes from composers like Mozart and Haydn, but lately she's been listening to a new cassette by the enigmatic Baltimore singer/songwriter Daniel Higgs. "It's a really nice thing to wake up to in the morning," she said. "If you only have 30 minutes to get out of the house, it's not really that convenient to put a record on — you've got to flip it. Cassettes are great for me. " This might be the age of iPods and now iPhones, but the lowly cassette tape — long abandoned by the average listener — is making a small yet fervent comeback, fueled by a devoted base of indie musicians and fans.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2011
On a chilly Friday night in New York City, Jana Hunter sang a dreamy ballad over a persistent bass line, her quivering voice cradled by the atomic guitar work of her bandmates in Lower Dens. Though it was impossible to tell from their tight set at Rockwood Music Hall, the Baltimore band was exhausted from its marathon of gigs for the CMJ Music Festival, indie music's Schwab's Pharmacy. Every October, musicians from across the globe come to New York to play there, performing at venues across the city before industry cool kids and music critics with hopes of landing a record deal, an agent, a jingle, whatever might snatch them from anonymity.
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