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NEWS
March 16, 2010
Ocean City public works employees struggled over the weekend to remove an 11-ton, 31-foot-long humpback whale carcass that washed up on the beach. The female whale's carcass first washed up at Fifth Street on Saturday afternoon; riptides pulled it into the current and it came ashore at Third Street. Public Works employee Dick Malone made a lasso from 75 feet of chain and looped it around the tail. With the help of a bulldozer and tractor, workers hauled the carcass down the beach under the Ocean City Pier.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Names are not what they seem for the Baltimore rock quintet Vinny Vegas. Start with the band's name: It is not the alter ego of lead singer Scott Siskind, but rather an obscure reference to a professional wrestler from the early '90s. Then there's the title of the group's debut album, November's “The Big White Whale,” whose vinyl release will be celebrated at a Vinny Vegas-headlining show at Metro Gallery on Saturday. Despite cover art that depicts a diver next to a massive whale, Siskind said the title has nothing to do with Herman Melville's novel.
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NEWS
By John Rivera | September 30, 1991
A 40-foot whale was spotted yesterday swimming up the Chesapeake Bay, but marine biologists at Baltimore's National Aquarium said they could not yet determine if the huge creature was in trouble.The whale was first spotted at 11:30 a.m. and last seen at 3 p.m. about 4 1/2 miles off the Eastern Shore town of Rock Hall, said Cheryl Messinger, marine mammal stranding coordinator at the aquarium.Maryland Natural Resources police and the Coast Guard vessels were keeping watch over the area to keep recreational boaters away from the whale and lost sight of it at 3p.m.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
Two decades worth of rain, sun, wind and dirt had so faded and chipped the mural of life-size whales that many of the thousands of daily commuters who travel the busy section of Russell Street likely didn't notice the massive piece of art. "Extinct Atlantic Gray Whales," a 5,200-square-foot painting, has graced the side of a CapitalTristate electrical distributors warehouse at Russell and Hamburg streets since 1993 - long enough for many to forget...
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 8, 2010
A judge has ordered the Calvert Marine Museum to pay a homeowners association $10,001 for improperly removing a 10 million-year-old fossil whale skeleton from communally owned cliffs. After more than eight hours of testimony over two days, Calvert Circuit Judge Warren Krug ordered the museum in Solomons to pay the community $1 for trespassing, and $10,000 for the value of the fossil. But while it was a win for the Chesapeake Ranch Estates property owners' association, its president, John Eney, called the award "an insult," and the victory "hollow."
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Staff Writer | April 18, 1992
Scientists from the Smithsonian Institution and Maryland officials spent yesterday examining the carcass of a 10-ton humpback whale that washed ashore Thursday along Assateague Island National Seashore south of Ocean City.Strandings of large whales occur every year or two on beaches in Maryland and Virginia. The scientists were taking advantage of this week's find to examine an intact carcass and learn more about the species, said Jack Kumer, a wildlife biologist with the National Park Service at Assateague.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2013
David Poyer is a retired naval officer, and most of the 34 thrillers that he's written draw on his experience serving in the waters of the Atlantic, Arctic, Pacific, Caribbean and Persian Gulf. So it was inevitable that at some point he'd take on the whale of all tales, "Moby Dick. " But try as Poyer might, he couldn't figure out how to write the sequel to Herman Melville's great American novel. Then one day, while the 63-year-old Poyer was teaching a creative writing course at Pennsylvania's Wilkes University, the solution came to him in a flash: "When I'm brainstorming with students, my brain doubles its IQ after a short period of time from my usually reptilian torpor at home," the 63-year-old Poyer said in a telephone interview.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL SHULTZ and MICHAEL SHULTZ,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 30, 2000
"Ahab's Trade: The Saga of South Seas Whaling," by Granville Allen Mawer. St. Martin's Press. 393 pages. $29.95. Let the scholars debate what drove Ahab's megalomaniac search for Moby Dick. It was profit that drove his Yankee whale-boat cousins, Granville Allen Mawer tells us. And drove them it did. As they depleted the whale grounds within a comfortable cruise of their cozy New England villages, the whalemen found themselves sailing farther, in larger boats, and on longer voyages, than they had before.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | January 18, 2007
Captain Ahab assembled the crew of the Pequod and told them that they could not afford to fail in the quest to kill the great white whale, and so he had come up with a plan. The Pequod lay becalmed on a glassy sea, the sails hung loose, the ship drifting with the current. The Captain had mulled over the recommendations of the Moby Dick Study Group and rejected them. "If we turn back to New Bedford now, as the Old Ones suggest, we risk the loss of the high seas." And so he had decided to put 10 oarsmen in a longboat and to row ahead, towing the ship, "surging" it forward.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1995
It happens every season about this time, a team rising from the depths just like a mummy marching his bandages out of a swamp in an old Boris Karloff movie. It cheers the hearts of fans, owners and particularly those individuals with money to cast to the winds and eager to join the expansion parade.Come on down, Hartford, the price is right!Through their first dozen games last year, the Whalers were having their problems, winning just two games, both against Ottawa (9-34-5). The Whalers' slow start was no surprise.
TRAVEL
By Rachael Pacella, For The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2013
The ocean is full of life and if you're lucky you get to see it when you visit the shore. Some parasailers in Ocean City got very lucky last Sunday when they spotted a humpback whale playing in the water below them. “The boats were in the right place at the right time,” said Tyler Barnes, owner of Paradise Watersports . The parasailing boats were within a mile of the shore when the whale appeared, breaching several times around the boats. “The whale wasn't scared or anything, it was just playfully doing its thing” Barnes said.
NEWS
By Martin Weil and and Maggie Fazeli Fard, The Washington Post | August 5, 2013
From the banks of the Potomac River, in a region steeped in American history, a massive fossil was dug up last month that apparently can be traced back to a time long before this country's recorded history, a time deep in the world's prehistory. The fossil is the skull of a whale that is "approximately 15 million years old," said John Nance, the paleontology collections manager at the Calvert Marine Museum in Southern Maryland. The skull is about 6 feet long and is believed to weigh about 1,000 pounds.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
While researching a column about the venerable 172-year-old whaling vessel Charles W. Morgan that was recently relaunched at Mystic Seaport in Connecticut after a restoration, I came upon a 1979 article in a yellowing Baltimore Sun library clip written by Jim Holechek, a retired Baltimore public relations executive and author. Jim, who wrote the "Boating" column in The Sunday Sun for years, told the tale of Joseph Gordon, who later was director of health information for the city Health Department and earned a footnote in maritime history as the Morgan's last stowaway.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2013
David Poyer is a retired naval officer, and most of the 34 thrillers that he's written draw on his experience serving in the waters of the Atlantic, Arctic, Pacific, Caribbean and Persian Gulf. So it was inevitable that at some point he'd take on the whale of all tales, "Moby Dick. " But try as Poyer might, he couldn't figure out how to write the sequel to Herman Melville's great American novel. Then one day, while the 63-year-old Poyer was teaching a creative writing course at Pennsylvania's Wilkes University, the solution came to him in a flash: "When I'm brainstorming with students, my brain doubles its IQ after a short period of time from my usually reptilian torpor at home," the 63-year-old Poyer said in a telephone interview.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 16, 2013
Seismic testing for oil and gas off Maryland and other Atlantic coast states could cause widespread harm to whales, dolphins, sea turtles and fish, as well as to fishing and tourism, an environmental group warned Tuesday. Oceana said the federal government's own environmental impact statement estimates 138,500 whales and dolphins could be injured if seismic "airguns," which generate blasts of noise underwater, are used to explore for oil and gas along the Atlantic coast.  The Department of Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management is weighing applications to conduct offshore seismic testing from Delaware to Florida.
NEWS
By Tom Horton | September 10, 2012
I always worry, as I dust off the syllabus and prepare my fall course at Salisbury University - will the final exam show up? Storms along their 4,000-mile migration corridor or conditions on their sub-Arctic nesting grounds might delay the wild swans. They seldom arrive where I take my students until just before the semester ends. I designed "Topics in Chesapeake Bay" to be different. The university affords me the luxury of doing it as an inspirational condiment atop the required courses.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 22, 2006
LONDON -- Despite rescue efforts, a 17-foot-long northern bottlenose whale that had strayed into the Thames in central London died yesterday, the rescue team said. The whale, from a deep-water species usually found in the North Atlantic, had been in the river since Thursday, drawing thousands of onlookers as it swam past the Houses of Parliament on Friday. It died as marine specialists escorted it on a barge down the Thames toward the sea, the British Divers Marine Life Rescue group said last night.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writer | July 8, 1992
A young pilot whale stranded on the beach at Assateague Island National Seashore was rushed yesterday afternoon to the National Aquarium's marine mammal emergency room in a dramatic rescue operation.The female whale -- about 18 months old, 7 feet long, weighing 400 to 500 pounds, and perhaps still nursing from its mother when it got into trouble -- was found in shallow water by park rangers.As the tide ran out, and the creature became stranded on the sand, rangers and volunteers among the gathering spectators tried to keep its skin wet, covering the whale with a sheet and shading it with a tarp set up as a temporary tent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel | May 8, 2012
There are many unfortunate tattoos - the Tazmanian Devil immediately comes to mind. Or Tweety Bird. Basically anything Looney Tunes. But we wouldn't call Ryan Goff's tat unfortunate. We'd call it devotion. In 2009, Goff, the social media director at marketing agency MGH, was challenged by a client, Visit Baltimore, to get them 3,000 Twitter followers before two other cities reached that mark (a high Twitter following at the time). "Word spread ... followers poured in and before I knew it, I was permanently defacing my leg," said Goff, 27, who lives in Locust Point.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2010
The ancient "whale" skull discovered eroding from the clay at Calvert Cliffs last spring is actually that of an extinct species of dolphin. Scientists and volunteers extracted the 16 million-year-old fossil from the cliffs over the weekend. They revealed what paleontologist Stephen Godfrey of the Calvert Marine Museum tentatively identified Tuesday as a Eurhinodelphinid , an odd-looking marine mammal with a long, slender upper snout and a lower jaw about half that length. "It looks a little like a swordfish," he said.
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