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BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | February 21, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Supreme Court overturned a $79 million antitrust award against lumber producer Weyerhaeuser Co. yesterday in a ruling that will help shield companies from claims that they illegally tried to drive a competitor out of business. The justices unanimously said a jury used the wrong standard in concluding that Weyerhaeuser monopolized the Pacific Northwest market for finished alder, a hardwood used in furniture. A now-defunct rival accused Weyerhaeuser, the world's biggest forest products company, of overbidding for scarce logs.
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BUSINESS
October 30, 2007
Weyerhaeuser Co. Shares gained $5.51 to $73.85. North America's largest lumber producer may exceed $100 a share if it converts to a real estate investment trust and sells assets such as its recycling operations, Barron's said.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 14, 2000
FEDERAL WAY, Wash. - Weyerhaeuser Co. signaled yesterday that it may pursue a hostile takeover of Willamette Industries Inc. after the rival papermaker didn't respond to a $7 billion cash-and-debt acquisition offer. The third-largest forest-products company offered $48 for each share of Willamette, or 38 percent more than Friday's closing price. Weyerhaeuser would assume $1.7 billion in debt. Willamette is reviewing the proposal, said Cathy Dunn, a spokeswoman for the company. Weyerhaeuser said it first proposed combining the companies more than two years ago, and made an offer last week, according to a letter sent by its president and chief executive officer, Steven R. Rogel, to Duane C. McDougall, his counterpart at Willamette.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | February 21, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Supreme Court overturned a $79 million antitrust award against lumber producer Weyerhaeuser Co. yesterday in a ruling that will help shield companies from claims that they illegally tried to drive a competitor out of business. The justices unanimously said a jury used the wrong standard in concluding that Weyerhaeuser monopolized the Pacific Northwest market for finished alder, a hardwood used in furniture. A now-defunct rival accused Weyerhaeuser, the world's biggest forest products company, of overbidding for scarce logs.
BUSINESS
By SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER | December 31, 1996
Most people of a gambling nature wouldn't make a bet that required 40 years to learn if there's a payoff.Weyerhaeuser Co. did.In 1966, the company decided to convert its timberlands in the Pacific Northwest and the South to a then-untested concept known as "high-yield forestry." The idea was to manage trees much like an agricultural crop, and not to leave forests to nature and chance."Thirty years later, we're beginning to see these stands in their more mature form and what they're going to look like," said William Corbin, Weyerhaeuser's executive vice president for timberlands and distribution.
BUSINESS
October 30, 2007
Weyerhaeuser Co. Shares gained $5.51 to $73.85. North America's largest lumber producer may exceed $100 a share if it converts to a real estate investment trust and sells assets such as its recycling operations, Barron's said.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | August 24, 2006
SEATTLE -- Weyerhaeuser Co. abandoned plans to sell its paper division yesterday, saying it will merge it with Canada's Domtar Inc. in a $3.3 billion transaction that will create North America's largest maker of paper used in facsimile and copying machines. Weyerhaeuser's shareholders will get a 55 percent stake in the new company. The American firm also will get a majority of the 13-member board, plus $1.35 billion in cash. The new company will have 14,000 employees, be based in Montreal and will be led by Raymond Royer, Domtar's president and chief executive officer.
BUSINESS
January 14, 1992
Gov. William Donald Schaefer will lead state officials tomorrow in lobbying Weyerhaeuser Co. to make a new fire-retardant plywood in Maryland.The appeal by officials will coincide with the company's introduction of "Blazeguard," an alternative to roofing plywoods treated with fire-retardant chemicals. Blazeguard has a protective sheathing that acts as a fire retardant.Weyerhaeuser, a wood manufacturer based in Tacoma, Wash., makes the product at a plant in Longview, Wash. But the company is searching for an East Coast manufacturing site.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin | September 14, 1991
ThermoChem Inc., a Columbia high-tech company, announced yesterday that it has received an $18.5 million contract from the U.S. Department of Energy to demonstrate its state-of-the-art coal conversion machinery at a plant in Oregon.Mark Rotundo, ThermoChem's controller, said the $18.5 million will go for design, manufacture and installation of the technology at a Weyerhaeuser Paper Co. plant in Springfield, Ore. Weyerhaeuser and other subcontractors, will spend another $18.5 million on the project, he said.
NEWS
By Carl T. Rowan | January 22, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Have you noticed that the best things on TV these days are commercials? The creative talent now goes into selling products instead of entertaining us.Maybe age is dulling my taste buds, but there isn't a single program that I watch regularly as I always watched Ed Sullivan, ''Bonanza,'' ''Gunsmoke,'' ''All in the Family,'' Jackie Gleason, ''The Jeffersons'' . . . It has to be more than an ol' geezer's faulty and inflating memory when I...
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | August 24, 2006
SEATTLE -- Weyerhaeuser Co. abandoned plans to sell its paper division yesterday, saying it will merge it with Canada's Domtar Inc. in a $3.3 billion transaction that will create North America's largest maker of paper used in facsimile and copying machines. Weyerhaeuser's shareholders will get a 55 percent stake in the new company. The American firm also will get a majority of the 13-member board, plus $1.35 billion in cash. The new company will have 14,000 employees, be based in Montreal and will be led by Raymond Royer, Domtar's president and chief executive officer.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 14, 2000
FEDERAL WAY, Wash. - Weyerhaeuser Co. signaled yesterday that it may pursue a hostile takeover of Willamette Industries Inc. after the rival papermaker didn't respond to a $7 billion cash-and-debt acquisition offer. The third-largest forest-products company offered $48 for each share of Willamette, or 38 percent more than Friday's closing price. Weyerhaeuser would assume $1.7 billion in debt. Willamette is reviewing the proposal, said Cathy Dunn, a spokeswoman for the company. Weyerhaeuser said it first proposed combining the companies more than two years ago, and made an offer last week, according to a letter sent by its president and chief executive officer, Steven R. Rogel, to Duane C. McDougall, his counterpart at Willamette.
BUSINESS
By SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER | December 31, 1996
Most people of a gambling nature wouldn't make a bet that required 40 years to learn if there's a payoff.Weyerhaeuser Co. did.In 1966, the company decided to convert its timberlands in the Pacific Northwest and the South to a then-untested concept known as "high-yield forestry." The idea was to manage trees much like an agricultural crop, and not to leave forests to nature and chance."Thirty years later, we're beginning to see these stands in their more mature form and what they're going to look like," said William Corbin, Weyerhaeuser's executive vice president for timberlands and distribution.
NEWS
By Carl T. Rowan | January 22, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Have you noticed that the best things on TV these days are commercials? The creative talent now goes into selling products instead of entertaining us.Maybe age is dulling my taste buds, but there isn't a single program that I watch regularly as I always watched Ed Sullivan, ''Bonanza,'' ''Gunsmoke,'' ''All in the Family,'' Jackie Gleason, ''The Jeffersons'' . . . It has to be more than an ol' geezer's faulty and inflating memory when I...
BUSINESS
January 14, 1992
Gov. William Donald Schaefer will lead state officials tomorrow in lobbying Weyerhaeuser Co. to make a new fire-retardant plywood in Maryland.The appeal by officials will coincide with the company's introduction of "Blazeguard," an alternative to roofing plywoods treated with fire-retardant chemicals. Blazeguard has a protective sheathing that acts as a fire retardant.Weyerhaeuser, a wood manufacturer based in Tacoma, Wash., makes the product at a plant in Longview, Wash. But the company is searching for an East Coast manufacturing site.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin | September 14, 1991
ThermoChem Inc., a Columbia high-tech company, announced yesterday that it has received an $18.5 million contract from the U.S. Department of Energy to demonstrate its state-of-the-art coal conversion machinery at a plant in Oregon.Mark Rotundo, ThermoChem's controller, said the $18.5 million will go for design, manufacture and installation of the technology at a Weyerhaeuser Paper Co. plant in Springfield, Ore. Weyerhaeuser and other subcontractors, will spend another $18.5 million on the project, he said.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1996
Stewart J. Greenebaum and Sam Rose are to real estate development what Tony Randall and Jack Klugman were to television.Mr. Greenebaum, always nattily dressed in a crisp suit and tie, plays golf, attends the theater, chairs the University of Maryland Medical System and devotes considerable time to charity. Mr. Rose hunts, fishes, collects art and raises bees, and boasts that he hasn't worn neckwear in more than 20 years.Mr. Rose's expertise lies in building lucrative office towers in Washington, D.C., while Mr. Greenebaum develops land for communities such as Shipley's Choice in Anne Arundel County.
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