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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2012
Another 112 acres of wetlands are being added to Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge near Cambridge, federal officials announced Wednesday. The Blackwater acquisition for $505,000 is part of more than 6,200 acres of wildlife habitat being preserved at seven refuges nationwide, according to the Department of Interior. The purchases are being paid for with more than $6 million from sales of federal duck hunting stamps. Maryland's Sens. Benjamin L. Cardin and Barbara A. Mikulski hailed the announcement, noting that the refuge is one of Dorchester County's top tourist attractions.
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By Matt Schnabel, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
Discarded bottles, empty bags of chips and errant playground balls littered the shoreline of the Fort McHenry Wetland, a 7.5-acre hub of biodiversity home to hundreds of plant and animal species. "Anything that floats ends up downstream," said Laura Bankey, director of conservation for the National Aquarium, the wetland's steward since 1999. "Because this is a soft shoreline with vegetation, it ends up here. " To combat pollution plaguing the marsh habitat, about 250 volunteers picked up trash, dredged debris, planted trees and tended the wetland's gardens Saturday as part of a cleanup event hosted by the aquarium and the National Parks Conservation Association.
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NEWS
April 20, 2010
The article "Law bars homeowner from installing solar panels on pier" (April 16) underscores the need for Maryland to find ways we can increase clean, renewable energy while also protecting wetlands and critical areas. The Department of the Environment applauds individual efforts to reduce air emissions by using solar power. Maryland's wetlands law, though, prevents development that is detrimental to wetland resources, such as submerged aquatic vegetation, and does not allow building or placing items on piers that are not required to be over water.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
A developer's request for permits to build a bitterly disputed waterfront housing project on Kent Island has been put on hold after state officials discovered a "business relationship" between a high-ranking Maryland environmental official and a lawyer for the development team. In a written statement, the state Board of Public Works said Friday that it would delay action on the Four Seasons project pending a review of the relationship between the lawyer and the board's longtime wetlands administrator, Doldon W. Moore Jr. "The Board of Public Works recently became aware of a business relationship between the wetlands administrator and an attorney representing the applicant for the tidal wetlands license that is referred to as Four Seasons at Kent Island," it said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2012
The state Board of Public Works gave its unanimous approval Wednesday to a wetlands dredging permit for a company that hopes to build a third nuclear reactor at the Calvert Cliffs power plant in Southern Maryland, even though the project is far from getting off the ground. The board granted the permit to UniStar Operating Services LLC after being told approval would help the company secure the licensing, financing and U.S.-based partner it would need to get the stalled project moving.
NEWS
By Richard Miniter | April 19, 1991
WITH THE black waves of Boston Harbor at his back, candidate George Bush pledged that under his presidency there would be "no net loss of the nation's remaining wetlands."Bush had swooped into then-Gov. Michael Dukakis' backyard to steal the environmental vote. His green battle cry -- "no net loss" -- was the brainchild of Conservation Foundation President William K. Reilly, who became Bush's Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administrator. And in contrast to the reversal of his "no new taxes" stand, this is a promise the president has conspicuously tried to keep.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2012
If a little green might help restore Baltimore's ailing harbor, how can a lot be bad? That's the question city, state and federal officials are pondering as they weigh a local marina magnate's plan to fill an unused corner of the Inner Harbor with a large floating marsh. Inspired by a pair of pint-sized experimental wetlands placed in the harbor two years ago, Dan Naor has proposed building a much larger one, covering 1.6 acres of open water in the Harborview marina off Key Highway.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2012
Baltimore's Inner Harbor is about to dramatically enlarge one of its newest attractions — one meant to draw crabs and fish as well as tourists. For weeks now, teams of young and adult volunteers have been assembling what promoters say will be Maryland's largest floating wetland, to be anchored along the bulkhead off the World Trade Center. It's a 10-fold enlargement of a tiny, checkerboard array of grassy floats tethered by the trade center tower since summer 2010. Those initial wetlands, plus one launched at the same time by the National Aquarium, marked the mostly symbolic beginning of an ambitious campaign to clean up Baltimore's degraded harbor and make it swimmable and fishable by the end of the decade.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2010
Baltimore's Inner Harbor was once ringed by wetlands, but over time they gave way to development until only one was left. Now there are two. Volunteers in kayaks, a small boat and a canoe towed a "floating wetland island" from Fells Point — where it took form — to the waters alongside Baltimore's World Trade Center on Sunday. Tourists stopped to gawk and snap photographs as the environmentally friendly flotilla made its slow way along the harbor, the cargo more eye-catching in its greenery than anything else in the crowded waterway.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
More than 100 gloved volunteers, some in boots and others in waist-high waders, streamed along narrow paths and historic sea walls Saturday in a secluded nook of wetlands just south of Fort McHenry, their eyes scanning for trash or the perfect spot to plant a sapling. The volunteer cleanup and tree-planting event mostly centered on collecting garbage and removing large pieces of driftwood smothering growth areas for grasses. But from time to time, a more novel item turned up. "Here's a tennis ball," said Gail Hoffer, 48, a volunteer from Elkridge, who decided to join the cleanup after getting an email about it from the National Aquarium in Baltimore , where she's a member.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 30, 2013
The Chesapeake Bay cleanup effort got a $9.2 million injection of funds Wednesday, as the Environmental Protection Agency and National Fish and Wildlife Foundation announced grants to 40 projects to reduce storm-water and farm pollution, rebuild oyster reefs and restore trout streams and other habitats across the six-state watershed. More than $2 million is going to projects in Maryland, including nearly $250,000 to the local environmental group Blue Water Baltimore to "engage" churches and other religious groups in the city on how they can reduce their storm-water fees.  Churches and other nonprofits in the city and across Maryland have protested the fees - which for those with large parking lots and buildings could be substantial - prompting politicians to seek to reduce the fees or even repeal the state law requiring they be levied.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 25, 2013
Millions in federal funds are to be spent in Maryland to help protect Smith Island, Crisfield and other coastal communities from devastating flooding like that caused by last year's Superstorm Sandy. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell announced Thursday her department would dole out $162 million for 45 restoration and research projects to help Atlantic coast communities fend off storm surges and rising sea level.  The restoration projects focus on shielding marsh and wetlands at wildlife refuges, but studies are to be funded that would improve flooding and storm resilience of coastal communiites as well.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
More than 100 gloved volunteers, some in boots and others in waist-high waders, streamed along narrow paths and historic sea walls Saturday in a secluded nook of wetlands just south of Fort McHenry, their eyes scanning for trash or the perfect spot to plant a sapling. The volunteer cleanup and tree-planting event mostly centered on collecting garbage and removing large pieces of driftwood smothering growth areas for grasses. But from time to time, a more novel item turned up. "Here's a tennis ball," said Gail Hoffer, 48, a volunteer from Elkridge, who decided to join the cleanup after getting an email about it from the National Aquarium in Baltimore , where she's a member.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2012
If a little green might help restore Baltimore's ailing harbor, how can a lot be bad? That's the question city, state and federal officials are pondering as they weigh a local marina magnate's plan to fill an unused corner of the Inner Harbor with a large floating marsh. Inspired by a pair of pint-sized experimental wetlands placed in the harbor two years ago, Dan Naor has proposed building a much larger one, covering 1.6 acres of open water in the Harborview marina off Key Highway.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 25, 2012
The message arrived last month with something like the urgency of a gold strike: Native brook trout, lots of them, discovered in the twin ditch creeks of an old farm in Hereford, in northern Baltimore County. Environmental scientists get pretty excited about this sort of thing. They found brown trout, too, and other smaller fish that a kid splashing around in summer might call minnows: sculpins, black-nosed dace and rosy-sided dace. Signs of life, to be sure, but more than that — signs of a delicate species' survival in a stream degraded for decades by the practices of men trying to earn a living off the land.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2012
Baltimore's Inner Harbor is about to dramatically enlarge one of its newest attractions — one meant to draw crabs and fish as well as tourists. For weeks now, teams of young and adult volunteers have been assembling what promoters say will be Maryland's largest floating wetland, to be anchored along the bulkhead off the World Trade Center. It's a 10-fold enlargement of a tiny, checkerboard array of grassy floats tethered by the trade center tower since summer 2010. Those initial wetlands, plus one launched at the same time by the National Aquarium, marked the mostly symbolic beginning of an ambitious campaign to clean up Baltimore's degraded harbor and make it swimmable and fishable by the end of the decade.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff John Fairhall contributed to this story | March 27, 1991
Environmentalists warn that new federal wetlands guidelines being weighed by the Bush administration could eliminate development restrictions on millions of acres of nontidal wetlands, including up to one-fourth of the inland marshy areas on Maryland's Eastern Shore.With pressure growing in Congress to ease federal wetlands protections, environmentalists say they fear the administration is moving to scale back regulation of the more controversial wetlands, which lack waterfowl, standing water and other obvious marshland features.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | October 25, 1994
Roughly 4,500 acres of wetlands are being lost every year in the Chesapeake Bay region through illegal filling and loopholes in government regulation, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation says.In a report to be released today, the Annapolis-based environmental group says that despite government pledges to ensure "no net loss" of remaining wetlands, the amount of marshland bulldozed or drained every four years equals in size Dorchester County's vast Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge.Wetlands -- from salt marsh to freshwater bog to damp woods -- act as natural filters for pollution and provide food and shelter for fish, shellfish and waterfowl.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | March 13, 2012
After years of investigation and some limited cleanup, an old Dundalk area dumping ground containing toxic wastes is due for federal attention now. The Environmental Protection Agency announced today (3/13) that it is adding the Sauer Dump to the National Priorities List, also known as Superfund , because the soil and wetland sediment on the 2.5-acre site contain high concentrations of lead, PCBs and other hazardous chemicals. The partly wooded tract on Back River was originally marshland that was filled in by a past owner, according to EPA. Toxic substances were deposited there while it operated as a dump from the 1960s through the 1980s. A number of homes are nearby.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2012
Another 112 acres of wetlands are being added to Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge near Cambridge, federal officials announced Wednesday. The Blackwater acquisition for $505,000 is part of more than 6,200 acres of wildlife habitat being preserved at seven refuges nationwide, according to the Department of Interior. The purchases are being paid for with more than $6 million from sales of federal duck hunting stamps. Maryland's Sens. Benjamin L. Cardin and Barbara A. Mikulski hailed the announcement, noting that the refuge is one of Dorchester County's top tourist attractions.
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