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NEWS
July 6, 2011
With regard to the piece on state-run public TV, David Zurawik gets to the heart of the matter when he says, "the community-based formula, as practiced at WETA in Washington, is vastly superior in terms of guaranteeing editorial independence and community access. " ("Chris Christie's take on state-run public TV outlets — like MPT," July 5.) While Gov. Martin O'Malley may be completely blameless, the door is wide open for the abuse of power by less-then-honorable officials.
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By Kathy Hudsonhudmud@aol.com | February 29, 2012
My earliest memories of music are of my grandmother singing “Once in Royal David City,” as she drove me the half-hour from our house to her apartment, and of listening to my mother's classical record colllection. The minute I took ballet, my friends and I played her 33-rpm recording of Tchaikovsky's “Swan Lake” and “Nutcracker Suite,” and performed in our dining room, where the table was kept to the side. We marched to clear red plastic 45-rpm recordings of John Philip Sousa and sang endlessly Gilbert and Sullivan's “I'm Called Little Buttercup” from records with pictures printed on them.
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik | January 6, 1999
WETA, a major producer of public television programs, will be going into the cable television business this spring with a new channel devoted to public affairs.The Washington home of such shows as "The NewsHour With Jim Lehrer" announced yesterday that it is teaming with Gannett's Freedom Forum to create the Forum Network, a 24-hour regional channel featuring news and public affairs programs.The pairing of a public television station with a private foundation to create a cable channel is unprecedented but indicative of the new kinds of arrangements being made by PBS operations these days.
NEWS
July 6, 2011
With regard to the piece on state-run public TV, David Zurawik gets to the heart of the matter when he says, "the community-based formula, as practiced at WETA in Washington, is vastly superior in terms of guaranteeing editorial independence and community access. " ("Chris Christie's take on state-run public TV outlets — like MPT," July 5.) While Gov. Martin O'Malley may be completely blameless, the door is wide open for the abuse of power by less-then-honorable officials.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Evening Sun Staff | November 13, 1990
The pregnancies of eight women from Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia will unfold over the next six months as a television series becomes a textbook on prenatal care.The live series, "Nine Months," will make public the changes and challenges in the lives of expectant mothers from a variety of lifestyles and situations. They range from a 15-year-old from Southeast Washington to a 36-year-old married woman with two children who lives in Annandale, Va. All are due to deliver their babies between March 15 and April 1, 1991.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 19, 2005
Despite the threat of government fines and no support from the Public Broadcasting Service, several major public television stations - including MPT and Washington's WETA - announced yesterday that next week they will air the unedited version of a searing documentary about the Iraq war. It is the second time in recent weeks that member stations have gone against the advice of PBS, their national programming network. A Company of Soldiers, a Frontline report scheduled to air Tuesday night at 10, contains 13 expletives - most of them uttered by American GIs in the heat of combat.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 11, 1998
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra has a new media partner for its radio broadcast series: WETA-FM in Shirlington, Va.The BSO has been looking for a new producer-distributor for its "Casual Concerts" broadcast series since last fall, when WJHU-FM in Baltimore dropped the vestiges of its classical music programming and became an all news and jazz station.At that time, WJHU agreed to complete its contract to produce the series, but it moved the broadcast to 6 a.m. Sundays. WBJC-FM, which also carries the concerts, will continue to do so next season.
FEATURES
April 24, 2006
Lucille Ball (above) is the subject of the PBS American Masters profile Lucille Ball: Finding Lucy (10 p.m.-11:30 p.m., WETA, Channel 26).
FEATURES
By New York Times | September 14, 1990
In a move that stunned the management of WETA, the major public television station in Washington, a public television station in Rochester, N.Y., has been chosen to produce future programs for the series "In Performance at the White House," the White House said yesterday.The series, which WETA developed, has presented 25 concerts since 1978, including three in the Bush Administration, ranging from classical to popular music.The programs, each of which cost about $350,000, will now be produced by WXXI, a station with little experience in presenting concerts for the national public television audience.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | November 16, 2002
John T. Potthast, the senior executive responsible for overseeing all original productions at Maryland Public Television, is leaving to accept a similar position at WETA, a Washington-area public broadcasting station. Potthast, who lives in Washington, said yesterday that the move was fueled by the desire to work closer to home after commuting to Owings Mills for three decades. He starts the job at WETA, based in Arlington, Va., in February, when he becomes eligible for a significant retirement package from MPT. "It was based on what is the best thing for me, at this stage, for my personal and professional life," said Potthast.
NEWS
By Matea Gold and Matea Gold,Los Angeles Times | April 15, 2007
NEW YORK -- America at a Crossroads did not get off to an auspicious start. From the beginning, the ambitious $20 million effort to examine the complexities of the post-Sept. 11 world through a series of documentaries - an initiative of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the private nonprofit organization that distributes federal funds to public television and radio - was greeted with skepticism. Independent producers and local station programmers, alarmed that CPB officials at the time were agitating for more conservatives on the air, feared the venture was driven by a political agenda.
FEATURES
April 24, 2006
Lucille Ball (above) is the subject of the PBS American Masters profile Lucille Ball: Finding Lucy (10 p.m.-11:30 p.m., WETA, Channel 26).
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 19, 2005
Despite the threat of government fines and no support from the Public Broadcasting Service, several major public television stations - including MPT and Washington's WETA - announced yesterday that next week they will air the unedited version of a searing documentary about the Iraq war. It is the second time in recent weeks that member stations have gone against the advice of PBS, their national programming network. A Company of Soldiers, a Frontline report scheduled to air Tuesday night at 10, contains 13 expletives - most of them uttered by American GIs in the heat of combat.
FEATURES
November 2, 2004
ABC (Ch. 2) From: ABC News headquarters in New York When: Starts at 6:30 p.m. Anchor: Peter Jennings CBS (Ch. 13) From: CBS News studios on West 57th in New York When: Starts at 7 p.m. Anchor: Dan Rather NBC (Ch. 11) From: Rockefeller Center in New York When: Starts at 7 p.m. Anchor: Tom Brokaw PBS (Chs. 22, 67) From: WETA in Washington When: Starts at 10 p.m. Anchor: Jim Lehrer CNN From: Nasdaq Tower in New York's Times Square When: Starts at 7 p.m. Anchor: Wolf Blitzer Fox News Channel From: Studio D in New York When: Starts at 7 p.m. Anchor: Brit Hume
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | November 16, 2002
John T. Potthast, the senior executive responsible for overseeing all original productions at Maryland Public Television, is leaving to accept a similar position at WETA, a Washington-area public broadcasting station. Potthast, who lives in Washington, said yesterday that the move was fueled by the desire to work closer to home after commuting to Owings Mills for three decades. He starts the job at WETA, based in Arlington, Va., in February, when he becomes eligible for a significant retirement package from MPT. "It was based on what is the best thing for me, at this stage, for my personal and professional life," said Potthast.
ENTERTAINMENT
By DAVID ZURAWIK | May 5, 2002
TelevisionThe celebrated PBS series American Experience is near the top of its game tonight and next Sunday with Ulysses S. Grant, four hours about the Civil War general and later president that surprisingly presents not one fact too many or one battle too few. Using photographs, newspapers, political cartoons, posters and earnest academicians, the profile gives Grant a hearty historical going-over. What makes the film visually interesting and emotionally engaging is its skillful use of what were once called re-creations.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | November 9, 1993
Tonight's TV is surprisingly and refreshingly busy, so let's get right to it.* "Victim of Love: The Shannon Mohr Story" (8-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- As a television docudrama inspired by stories previously presented on "reality shows," this "Unsolved Mysteries Movie" is much better than the Charles Stuart case from "Rescue 911," though not nearly so potent as the John List case from "America's Most Wanted." NBC.* "Nova: 'The Real Jurassic Park' " (9-10 p.m., WMPT, Channels 22 and 67, WETA, Channel 26)
NEWS
January 24, 2002
When a young girl asked her uncle to read The Story of Babar, the Little Elephant to her, she had no idea that her uncle, French composer Francis Poulenc, would also improvise music on the piano to accompany it. The Music will illuminate the words to create a synthesis of arts. The story set to music is one being presented by the Candlelight Concerts' Performing Arts Series for Children at 2:30 p.m. and 4 p.m. Sunday at the Smith Theatre, Howard Community College. Other tales will be Cinderella, with music by Igor Stravinsky, and Richard Wilson's A Child's London.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | April 16, 1999
Lisa Simeone wasn't exactly sitting by the phone when one of her old radio buddies called looking for help. She didn't even jump at the chance to get back on the air with a nationally syndicated classical music program. Her interests have changed. But the offer did fit her life as a Baltimore free-lance announcer, even if taking the job meant getting up at 5: 30 a.m. to catch a 6: 30 train to National Public Radio's headquarters in Washington. That's rough duty for someone who is not a morning person.
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