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NEWS
October 18, 1991
The Census Bureau reports that the 1990 center of population in the U.S. now rests in a wooded area in Crawford County, Mo., having shifted a bit to the west from Desoto, Mo., since 1980. The population center is the spot where there are as many people living to the north as to the south, and to the east as to the west. In theory, at the population center an imaginary, flat, rigid map of the U.S. would balance perfectly on the point of a pencil if all 248,709,873 residents were of equal weight.
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HEALTH
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2012
For the first year in more than a decade, no rabies vaccine baits will be placed in Anne Arundel, after the county was cut from the federal program, according to county health officials. The project used a county police helicopter and volunteers to immunize thousands of raccoons and other small wild animals in an effort to prevent the spread of the deadly virus, dropping baits to be eaten by the animals in late summer and fall. The number of reported rabies cases has plummeted since the county began using the edible vaccine baits, starting with a small area in 1998.
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NEWS
November 22, 1996
PoliceMount Airy: A resident of Westward Drive told police that someone entered her home between 2: 30 p.m. and 6: 30 p.m. Nov. 15 and stole a charm ring and a wedding ring set. The loss was estimated at $2,455.Pub Date: 11/22/96
NEWS
By Alia Malik and Alia Malik,Sun reporter | August 10, 2007
Operation Safe Streets, a program run by the city Health Department to prevent violence through community outreach, will expand to an area in the western part of the city, Mayor Sheila Dixon and Health Commissioner Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein announced yesterday. Since June, the program has been implemented in parts of the McElderry Park and Madison East neighborhoods. The specific location of the new area has not been determined, but it will be in West or Southwest Baltimore and will be determined by homicide and shooting statistics, Dixon said.
NEWS
May 12, 2005
On May 7, 2005, AUDRE L. THOMAS; mother of Marc Thomas. Also survived by other relatives. Friends may call at the PHILLIPS FUNERAL HOME, P.A., 1721-27 N. Monroe St. (Westward Avenue), Friday 1 to 8 P.M.
NEWS
June 7, 1993
Paul Malvern, 91, a Hollywood stuntman who became the producer of more than 100 films, including many of John Wayne's early westerns, died May 29 in Los Angeles. More than 75 of Mr. Malvern's films were westerns, including the 1930s films "Westward Ho."
NEWS
April 25, 2003
On April 20, 2003, CLARA E. BAILEY; dear mother of Edward Bailey (Sally); grandmother of Keith Bailey. Also survived by other relatives. Friends may call at PHILLIPS FUNERAL HOME, P.A., 1721-27 North Monroe Street, (Westward Ave) Friday, 10 A.M. to 8 P.M. Family will receive friends Saturday, 9 A.M. to 10 A.M. with mass to follow at St. James Episcopal Church, Lafayette & Arlington Avenues. Interment Arbutus Memorial Park.
NEWS
July 6, 2003
On June 29 2003, JOHN McKINLEY; devoted husband of Shirley Brown; father of Cheryl and Angela Brown and Elsie Williams. Also survived by other relatives. Friends may call at the PHILLIPS FUNERAL HOME, P.A., 1721-27 N. Monroe Street, (Westward Avenue), Sunday, 12 noon to 6 P.M. and Monday 10 to 5 P.M. Family will receive friends Monday, 6:30 to 7 P.M. with services to follow in above Chapel. Interment Garrison Forest Veterans Cemetery.
NEWS
September 12, 1994
Amy Clampitt, 74, known for her dense, ornate poetry, died of ovarian cancer Saturday at her home in Lenox, Mass. She published her first book of poetry, "The Kingfisher," when she was 63. It immediately pushed her to the front ranks of American poets. Organized around the elements earth, air, fire and water, "The Kingfisher" treated subjects as various as the plants and marine life of New England, John Lennon's murder, the Holocaust and the Vietnam War. It was followed by her poetry collections "What the Light Was Like" (1985)
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2003
AFTER YEARS of focusing on the revitalization of the area around East Baltimore's Patterson Park, Ed Rutkowski is setting his sights northward and westward -- if only for a few blocks. The executive director of the Patterson Park Community Development Corp. has come up with a tentative proposal for redeveloping what he calls "East of Hopkins" -- a 15-square-block swath of mostly abandoned and dilapidated properties adjacent to the Johns Hopkins medical complex. Rutkowski sees the revitalization of East of Hopkins as a way to build on the strength of the medical complex and the proposed biotechnology park to its north as well as a way to preserve the progress of renewal made in the Butchers Hill and Patterson Park neighborhoods to the south.
NEWS
May 12, 2005
On May 7, 2005, AUDRE L. THOMAS; mother of Marc Thomas. Also survived by other relatives. Friends may call at the PHILLIPS FUNERAL HOME, P.A., 1721-27 N. Monroe St. (Westward Avenue), Friday 1 to 8 P.M.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin | October 23, 2004
BREAK FREE of the Baltimore Beltway, slide onto the very beginning of westbound Interstate 70, and in a mile or so there it is on the left, on the median strip, that new highway sign, big and bright and proclaiming an American continent of possibilities. The 10-foot-by-22-foot sign, installed by the state last July, flatly announces: "Columbus 420 miles St. Louis 845 miles Denver 1700 miles Cove Fort 2200 miles" That's Cove Fort, Utah. It's hardly a metropolis -- and not even a town.
NEWS
July 6, 2003
On June 29 2003, JOHN McKINLEY; devoted husband of Shirley Brown; father of Cheryl and Angela Brown and Elsie Williams. Also survived by other relatives. Friends may call at the PHILLIPS FUNERAL HOME, P.A., 1721-27 N. Monroe Street, (Westward Avenue), Sunday, 12 noon to 6 P.M. and Monday 10 to 5 P.M. Family will receive friends Monday, 6:30 to 7 P.M. with services to follow in above Chapel. Interment Garrison Forest Veterans Cemetery.
NEWS
April 25, 2003
On April 20, 2003, CLARA E. BAILEY; dear mother of Edward Bailey (Sally); grandmother of Keith Bailey. Also survived by other relatives. Friends may call at PHILLIPS FUNERAL HOME, P.A., 1721-27 North Monroe Street, (Westward Ave) Friday, 10 A.M. to 8 P.M. Family will receive friends Saturday, 9 A.M. to 10 A.M. with mass to follow at St. James Episcopal Church, Lafayette & Arlington Avenues. Interment Arbutus Memorial Park.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2003
AFTER YEARS of focusing on the revitalization of the area around East Baltimore's Patterson Park, Ed Rutkowski is setting his sights northward and westward -- if only for a few blocks. The executive director of the Patterson Park Community Development Corp. has come up with a tentative proposal for redeveloping what he calls "East of Hopkins" -- a 15-square-block swath of mostly abandoned and dilapidated properties adjacent to the Johns Hopkins medical complex. Rutkowski sees the revitalization of East of Hopkins as a way to build on the strength of the medical complex and the proposed biotechnology park to its north as well as a way to preserve the progress of renewal made in the Butchers Hill and Patterson Park neighborhoods to the south.
NEWS
May 30, 2002
LOCATION IS the most significant feature about the University of Maryland, Baltimore's plan, announced last week, to build a biotech incubator. After two decades of debate and hesitation, the campus for the first time would leapfrog to the west side of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. Indeed, maps submitted to the Board of Regents show that over this decade the university intends to build offices and parking structures along a four-block stretch of Baltimore Street, all the way to Schroeder Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | February 11, 2001
I am not a historian. I am, however, a lifetime subscriber to George Santayana's sage chestnut (I avoid cilantro chestnuts): "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." Beyond being instructive, the past is the greatest of all moral forces. Every emergence from natural savagery has been on a staircase of awareness of what came before. Thus, I am deeply distressed by illogical academic fads that declare history to be arbitrary and inconsequential. So I'm nigh on ecstatic to find a book by a distinguished academic that both explores and celebrates humane values.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | April 11, 1999
People who do reviews here are told: "Writers should not review any book written by a close friend, a close professional associate, or by anyone with whom they have or have had quarrels or bad blood." I treasure the credibility of these pages.Today, I write about a book I should not be trusted to judge with stainless objectivity. It is by a man who has been a treasured friend for some 30 years. It is about him, and especially about a woman who was the center of his life for 13 years.She has been dead almost seven years now. I knew her simply as a warm and occasional friend, but I loved her wonderfully.
BUSINESS
By Diane Mikulis and Diane Mikulis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 12, 2001
The cry 150 years ago was, "Go West, young man." In Howard County today, the same can be said for homebuyers. And the western trail in Howard County many times leads to Woodbine. "It's the next phase for Howard County development. That's where people are moving," said Diane Kenworthy, a real estate agent for O'Conor, Piper & Flynn ERA. "The activity out there is very brisk. People still have the Howard County schools, but they have the rural feeling, and it's not as congested as other areas."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | February 11, 2001
I am not a historian. I am, however, a lifetime subscriber to George Santayana's sage chestnut (I avoid cilantro chestnuts): "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." Beyond being instructive, the past is the greatest of all moral forces. Every emergence from natural savagery has been on a staircase of awareness of what came before. Thus, I am deeply distressed by illogical academic fads that declare history to be arbitrary and inconsequential. So I'm nigh on ecstatic to find a book by a distinguished academic that both explores and celebrates humane values.
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