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BUSINESS
August 29, 1991
This New York-based paper and chemical manufacturer, which operates a giant facility in Western Maryland, has maintained its record of raising its dividend for a sixth consecutive year even though it reported sagging earnings for its third quarter, which ended July 31.Westvaco, whose paper and pulp mill in Luke is a mainstay of the Western Maryland economy, showed a 22 percent decline in per-share earnings for the quarter. For the first nine months of Westvaco's fiscal year, the per-share decline was 36 percent.
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BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2002
MeadWestvaco Corp.'s paper mill in Allegany County will lose about 150 jobs as part of the Stamford, Conn.-based company's continuing effort to eliminate 2,500 positions before the end of the year. The job reductions are the latest in a series of cuts that began in January after Dayton, Ohio-based Mead Corp. merged with Westvaco Corp. in a $3 billion deal that company officials said would result in $325 million in cost savings. The company plans to shut down eight machines that convert giant rolls of paper into sheets and move the majority of that work from its factory in Luke to Chillicothe, Ohio.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 10, 1999
NEW YORK -- Westvaco Corp., one of the largest U.S. makers of paperboard, said it agreed to allow the Nature Conservancy to suggest zones protecting rare wildlife in all the company's timberland, which could restrict logging.The agreement, effective Nov. 1, covers 1.3 million acres in Kentucky, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia. The nonprofit environmental group will survey the timberlands for areas that include endangered animals and plants, or even unusual waterfalls and rock formations, and recommend how to preserve them.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2001
State officials announced yesterday that they have reached agreement with Westvaco Corp. to "significantly" reduce pollution of the upper Potomac River by curtailing chocolate-colored wastes from the company's pulp and paper mill in Western Maryland. The deal immediately came under fire from the American Canoe Association, a coalition of canoe and kayak clubs, which contended that the cleanup required of the Luke mill is much too little to restore the impaired fish populations and recreational use of the North Branch of the Potomac.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2001
State officials announced yesterday that they have reached agreement with Westvaco Corp. to "significantly" reduce pollution of the upper Potomac River by curtailing chocolate-colored wastes from the company's pulp and paper mill in Western Maryland. The deal immediately came under fire from the American Canoe Association, a coalition of canoe and kayak clubs, which contended that the cleanup required of the Luke mill is much too little to restore the impaired fish populations and recreational use of the North Branch of the Potomac.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2000
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has asked a federal judge to shut down Westvaco Corp.'s pulp and paper mill in southern Allegany County until the company installs new pollution control equipment and to fine the company hundreds of millions of dollars for allegedly violating clean air laws. The agency charged in a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore that Westvaco has continually expanded its plant in Luke since 1981 without obtaining proper federal permits and without installing air pollution controls, causing large increases in emissions of nitrogen oxide and sulfur dioxide.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2000
LUKE - Bounded by lush forest and towering cliffs, the North Branch of the Potomac River offers some of Western Maryland's most breathtaking scenery as it winds through the Allegheny Mountains. Heron, osprey and even the occasional eagle prowl the skies looking for fish in the water. But the view is spoiled here for many anglers and outdoors enthusiasts by sour odors and industrial waste from Westvaco Corp.'s pulp and paper mill, which turns the river the color of chocolate milk for miles downstream.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1991
Crop GeneticsCrop Genetics International, a Hanover-based agricultural biotechnology firm, said that its losses widened during the quarter that ended Sept. 30, fueled by a loss caused by a one-time write-off of $1.7 million of technology acquired in its recent purchase of Espro Inc.Crop Genetics Chief Executive Officer Joseph W. Kelly said the technology involved, which is designed to create insect viruses that can be used as pesticides, isn't yet commercial because the viruses can't be made cheaply enough.
NEWS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | June 25, 1992
Most Maryland manufacturers were making do with warehoused supplies during the first day of a nationwide rail strike yesterday. But some business people warned that unless the trains started moving again soon, layoffs and shutdowns would follow.In addition, many managers started making plans yesterday to shift their freight to trucks or barges -- potentially increasing the costs of transporting their goods, but also creating a boon for the trucking industry.Harris LeFew, spokesman for the Westvaco Corp.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | March 25, 1992
State environmental officials yesterday relaxed their warning about eating fish caught in the upper Potomac River, saying there have been "substantial decreases" in dioxin contamination downstream from the Westvaco Corp. paper mill in Luke.The move was immediately criticized by environmentalists, who contend that Maryland's limits on dioxin, a suspected human carcinogen, are too lax.Citing new sampling results, the Maryland Department of the Environment dropped its nearly 2-year-old advice to limit consumption of bass and most other surface-feeding sport fish caught in the 40-mile stretch of the Potomac between Luke and Paw Paw, W.Va.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2000
LUKE - Bounded by lush forest and towering cliffs, the North Branch of the Potomac River offers some of Western Maryland's most breathtaking scenery as it winds through the Allegheny Mountains. Heron, osprey and even the occasional eagle prowl the skies looking for fish in the water. But the view is spoiled here for many anglers and outdoors enthusiasts by sour odors and industrial waste from Westvaco Corp.'s pulp and paper mill, which turns the river the color of chocolate milk for miles downstream.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2000
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has asked a federal judge to shut down Westvaco Corp.'s pulp and paper mill in southern Allegany County until the company installs new pollution control equipment and to fine the company hundreds of millions of dollars for allegedly violating clean air laws. The agency charged in a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore that Westvaco has continually expanded its plant in Luke since 1981 without obtaining proper federal permits and without installing air pollution controls, causing large increases in emissions of nitrogen oxide and sulfur dioxide.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 10, 1999
NEW YORK -- Westvaco Corp., one of the largest U.S. makers of paperboard, said it agreed to allow the Nature Conservancy to suggest zones protecting rare wildlife in all the company's timberland, which could restrict logging.The agreement, effective Nov. 1, covers 1.3 million acres in Kentucky, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia. The nonprofit environmental group will survey the timberlands for areas that include endangered animals and plants, or even unusual waterfalls and rock formations, and recommend how to preserve them.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1995
Air-Cure announces plans to merge with Allied IndustriesAir-Cure Technologies Inc. said yesterday it intends to acquire the common stock of Allied Industries Inc. of Houston, Texas.Michael Lawlor, Air-Cure Technologies president and chief executive officer, said, `The merger of Allied Industries with Air-Cure Technologies will create a combined enterprise with annual sales revenue in excess of $100 million."The merger, expected to close during the fourth quarter of 1995, will be treated as a pooling-of-interests for accounting purposes, officials said.
NEWS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | June 25, 1992
Most Maryland manufacturers were making do with warehoused supplies during the first day of a nationwide rail strike yesterday. But some business people warned that unless the trains started moving again soon, layoffs and shutdowns would follow.In addition, many managers started making plans yesterday to shift their freight to trucks or barges -- potentially increasing the costs of transporting their goods, but also creating a boon for the trucking industry.Harris LeFew, spokesman for the Westvaco Corp.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | March 25, 1992
State environmental officials yesterday relaxed their warning about eating fish caught in the upper Potomac River, saying there have been "substantial decreases" in dioxin contamination downstream from the Westvaco Corp. paper mill in Luke.The move was immediately criticized by environmentalists, who contend that Maryland's limits on dioxin, a suspected human carcinogen, are too lax.Citing new sampling results, the Maryland Department of the Environment dropped its nearly 2-year-old advice to limit consumption of bass and most other surface-feeding sport fish caught in the 40-mile stretch of the Potomac between Luke and Paw Paw, W.Va.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | March 25, 1992
State environmental officials have relaxed their warning about eating fish caught in the upper Potomac River, saying there have been "substantial decreases" in dioxin contamination downstream from the Westvaco Corp. paper mill in Luke.The move yesterday was immediately criticized by environmentalists, who contend that Maryland's limits on dioxin, a suspected human carcinogen, are too lax.Citing new sampling results, the Maryland Department of the Environment dropped its nearly 2-year-old advice to limit consumption of bass and most other surface-feeding sport fish caught in the 40-mile stretch of the Potomac between Luke and Paw Paw, W.Va.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | January 29, 1991
Environmentalists and fishermen today filed a lawsuit challenging the federal government's approval of Maryland's water pollution standard for dioxin, charging that the state's limit on the toxic chemical is so weak that human health and fish are endangered.The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Richmond, Va., contends that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency last year approved Maryland's water-quality standard for dioxin, even though the standard permits 100 times more of the toxic chemical into state streams and rivers than EPA recommends is safe.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | March 25, 1992
State environmental officials have relaxed their warning about eating fish caught in the upper Potomac River, saying there have been "substantial decreases" in dioxin contamination downstream from the Westvaco Corp. paper mill in Luke.The move yesterday was immediately criticized by environmentalists, who contend that Maryland's limits on dioxin, a suspected human carcinogen, are too lax.Citing new sampling results, the Maryland Department of the Environment dropped its nearly 2-year-old advice to limit consumption of bass and most other surface-feeding sport fish caught in the 40-mile stretch of the Potomac between Luke and Paw Paw, W.Va.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1991
Crop GeneticsCrop Genetics International, a Hanover-based agricultural biotechnology firm, said that its losses widened during the quarter that ended Sept. 30, fueled by a loss caused by a one-time write-off of $1.7 million of technology acquired in its recent purchase of Espro Inc.Crop Genetics Chief Executive Officer Joseph W. Kelly said the technology involved, which is designed to create insect viruses that can be used as pesticides, isn't yet commercial because the viruses can't be made cheaply enough.
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