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By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | June 16, 1993
CHICAGO -- Phoenix Suns rookie coach Paul Westphal received abundant praise for his team's three-overtime victory against the Chicago Bulls Sunday night. He changed all of his defensive assignments after consecutive home losses to the defending NBA champions."Paul was just like a baseball manager who changes his batting NBA Finals notebookorder, trying to shake thing up," said reserve guard Danny Ainge. "And this time it worked."Westphal's biggest gamble was assigning point guard Kevin Johnson to police Michael Jordan, the league scoring leader, who is 5 inches taller.
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By Cox News Service | December 25, 2006
As he tries to decipher the mysteries of space dust collected by NASA, physicist Andrew Westphal relies on giant X-ray machines, complex computers and cheap plastic microscopes made for kids by a toy company. The $80 microscopes and other electronic gadgets from Marietta, Ga.-based Digital Blue Corp. are expected to be hits with kids this holiday season. Westphal and fellow researchers involved in NASA's Stardust program are finding them powerful enough for grown-ups, too. A plaything for kids becoming a important tool for professionals might be an unusual story, but for Digital Blue, it's getting to be common.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2004
Herbert H. Westphal Jr., a retired salesman and big-band aficionado, died of a stroke Friday at an assisted-living facility in Southern Pines, N.C. He was 77 and lived in Cedarcroft until two months before his death. He was born in Baltimore and raised on Aisquith Street. In his youth, while a student at Polytechnic Institute, he delivered ice and worked for his father delivering The Sun. Mr. Westphal served in the Marine Corps from 1945 to 1948. "He learned to drive when a sergeant tossed him the keys to a jeep," said a daughter, Sandra L. Fenn of Eldersburg.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2004
Herbert H. Westphal Jr., a retired salesman and big-band aficionado, died of a stroke Friday at an assisted-living facility in Southern Pines, N.C. He was 77 and lived in Cedarcroft until two months before his death. He was born in Baltimore and raised on Aisquith Street. In his youth, while a student at Polytechnic Institute, he delivered ice and worked for his father delivering The Sun. Mr. Westphal served in the Marine Corps from 1945 to 1948. "He learned to drive when a sergeant tossed him the keys to a jeep," said a daughter, Sandra L. Fenn of Eldersburg.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1996
To Judy Westphal, helping to create a mammography program for co-workers at North Arundel Hospital was "just doing a part of my job."It was taking care of family, explained the 54-year-old nurse. "We just felt like you need to look after your own family, and, of course, this was our work family."But to the Glen Burnie Business and Professional Women's Association, it was an effort that led them to name her Woman of the Year for 1996. She was selected for the award based on co-workers' nominations.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff writer | May 10, 1992
A county District Court judge granted probation before judgment to a woman who was charged with prostitution after a police raid at a Columbia spa in January.Judge Lenore R. Gelfman found Song A. Westphal, 41, now a resident of Colorado, guilty of prostitution, based on a statement of facts from a police report read in court by Assistant State's Attorney Mary V. Murphy.Under the probation before judgment finding, there will be no prostitution conviction on Westphal's record if she complies with the probation terms.
SPORTS
By Helene Elliott and Helene Elliott,Los Angeles Times | May 5, 1993
INGLEWOOD, Calif. -- Paul Westphal made good on the first part of his prediction, but the Los Angeles Lakers came remarkably close to sweeping the Suns out of the first round of the playoffs and making the Phoenix coach eat his bold words.Phoenix held off a series of comebacks by the Lakers, who cut a 14-point deficit to one with 19.7 seconds to play, and stayed alive in the Western Conference first-round, best-of-five series with a 107-102 victory last night.The Suns -- who got 27 points from Charles Barkley, 18 from Richard Dumas and 17 from Kevin Johnson -- are attempting to become the fourth team in NBA playoff history to win a best-of-five series after losing the first two games.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | June 10, 1993
PHOENIX -- Jerry Colangelo, the president and architect o the Western Conference champion Phoenix Suns, remembers the skepticism he expressed when, in 1968, the NBA first proposed awarding a franchise to this desert city."
NEWS
By Cox News Service | December 25, 2006
As he tries to decipher the mysteries of space dust collected by NASA, physicist Andrew Westphal relies on giant X-ray machines, complex computers and cheap plastic microscopes made for kids by a toy company. The $80 microscopes and other electronic gadgets from Marietta, Ga.-based Digital Blue Corp. are expected to be hits with kids this holiday season. Westphal and fellow researchers involved in NASA's Stardust program are finding them powerful enough for grown-ups, too. A plaything for kids becoming a important tool for professionals might be an unusual story, but for Digital Blue, it's getting to be common.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | June 9, 1993
PHOENIX -- Help!That will be the operative word on defense for both the Chicago Bulls and the Phoenix Suns, who begin the best-of-seven NBA Finals tonight at the America West Arena.Suns rookie head coach Paul Westphal acknowledges no single defender will neutralize Bulls superstar Michael Jordan or his Olympic sidekick Scottie Pippen in their pursuit of a third straight championship.On the other end of the court, Bulls coach Phil Jackson is equally concerned in finding ways to control Most Valuable Player Charles Barkley's inside game and point guard Kevin Johnson's slashing drives to the hoop.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | February 7, 1997
On the day after firing coach Jim Lynam, Washington Bullets general manager Wes Unseld was on the phone making calls to potential candidates -- and at the same time fielding calls from a few people trying to add themselves to the mix."I've been getting a lot of calls from people, yes," Unseld said last night. "It's going painfully slow. It's a lot of people you have to contact, but it's a process you have to go through. It's going OK."And by today Unseld likely will begin face-to-face discussions with coaching candidates when he arrives in Cleveland for this weekend's NBA All-Star Game activities.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1996
To Judy Westphal, helping to create a mammography program for co-workers at North Arundel Hospital was "just doing a part of my job."It was taking care of family, explained the 54-year-old nurse. "We just felt like you need to look after your own family, and, of course, this was our work family."But to the Glen Burnie Business and Professional Women's Association, it was an effort that led them to name her Woman of the Year for 1996. She was selected for the award based on co-workers' nominations.
SPORTS
By JERRY BEMBRY | January 10, 1995
When the Phoenix Suns, a team heavy in forwards, began to shop Cedric Ceballos during the off-season, coach Paul Westphal was surprised at the response.Or lack of response. The Suns eventually dealt Ceballos to the Los Angeles Lakers for a mid-first-round pick."The Lakers were the only team to offer even that much," Westphal said. "The other teams were too stupid to give us a first-round pick."And the other teams have to be kicking themselves with the way Ceballos is playing this season for the Lakers.
SPORTS
By Mark Whicker and Mark Whicker,Orange County (Calif.) Register | June 17, 1993
CHICAGO -- This is why he opens a restaurant with a bi ballooning basketball growing out of the roof, and people line up on game nights all the way around a city block.This is why they name shoes and hamburgers after him; why million-dollar baseball players genuflect when they meet him; why we can cluck our tongues about his golf and his gambling and his ego, and we still cannot touch him.This -- a flipping, spinning shot in the lane with 13 seconds left in Game 4 of the NBA Finals, with Nike buddy Charles Barkley on his backside.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | June 16, 1993
CHICAGO -- Phoenix Suns rookie coach Paul Westphal received abundant praise for his team's three-overtime victory against the Chicago Bulls Sunday night. He changed all of his defensive assignments after consecutive home losses to the defending NBA champions."Paul was just like a baseball manager who changes his batting NBA Finals notebookorder, trying to shake thing up," said reserve guard Danny Ainge. "And this time it worked."Westphal's biggest gamble was assigning point guard Kevin Johnson to police Michael Jordan, the league scoring leader, who is 5 inches taller.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | June 10, 1993
PHOENIX -- Jerry Colangelo, the president and architect o the Western Conference champion Phoenix Suns, remembers the skepticism he expressed when, in 1968, the NBA first proposed awarding a franchise to this desert city."
SPORTS
By Mark Whicker and Mark Whicker,Orange County (Calif.) Register | June 17, 1993
CHICAGO -- This is why he opens a restaurant with a bi ballooning basketball growing out of the roof, and people line up on game nights all the way around a city block.This is why they name shoes and hamburgers after him; why million-dollar baseball players genuflect when they meet him; why we can cluck our tongues about his golf and his gambling and his ego, and we still cannot touch him.This -- a flipping, spinning shot in the lane with 13 seconds left in Game 4 of the NBA Finals, with Nike buddy Charles Barkley on his backside.
NEWS
January 27, 1993
Herbert WestphalSun deliverymanHerbert H. Westphal, who owned a Baltimore Sun home delivery route in East Baltimore for many years, died early Monday of heart failure at home on Walton Way in Timonium where he lived with his daughter.Retired for nearly 40 years, Mr. Westphal, who was 91, had delivered the morning, evening and Sunday papers for 35 years in an area to the north of Patterson Park.Before that, he worked as a shipping clerk for the Baltimore Bargain House.Born in East Baltimore and reared in Northeast Baltimore, he attended Loyola High School where he played on the football team.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | June 9, 1993
PHOENIX -- Help!That will be the operative word on defense for both the Chicago Bulls and the Phoenix Suns, who begin the best-of-seven NBA Finals tonight at the America West Arena.Suns rookie head coach Paul Westphal acknowledges no single defender will neutralize Bulls superstar Michael Jordan or his Olympic sidekick Scottie Pippen in their pursuit of a third straight championship.On the other end of the court, Bulls coach Phil Jackson is equally concerned in finding ways to control Most Valuable Player Charles Barkley's inside game and point guard Kevin Johnson's slashing drives to the hoop.
SPORTS
By Helene Elliott and Helene Elliott,Los Angeles Times | May 5, 1993
INGLEWOOD, Calif. -- Paul Westphal made good on the first part of his prediction, but the Los Angeles Lakers came remarkably close to sweeping the Suns out of the first round of the playoffs and making the Phoenix coach eat his bold words.Phoenix held off a series of comebacks by the Lakers, who cut a 14-point deficit to one with 19.7 seconds to play, and stayed alive in the Western Conference first-round, best-of-five series with a 107-102 victory last night.The Suns -- who got 27 points from Charles Barkley, 18 from Richard Dumas and 17 from Kevin Johnson -- are attempting to become the fourth team in NBA playoff history to win a best-of-five series after losing the first two games.
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