Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWestminster Residents
IN THE NEWS

Westminster Residents

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 4, 1997
Two Westminster residents were arrested Wednesday after police received a complaint about drug dealing from a 1985 Ford LTD, authorities said.A car matching the description was stopped on East Main Street about 2: 50 p.m. and a police dog signaled that drugs were present, police said.A small quantity of cocaine and drug paraphernalia were found in the car, police said.Arrested on charges of possession of cocaine and possession of paraphernalia were: Mary S. Chider, 20, of the 300 block of Stacy Lee Drive and Christopher L. Magruder, 25, of the first block of Sullivan Road.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2013
Suelyn Rivera, who lives in Westminster, knows the transformative power of reading to children. As a media specialist at Carrolltowne Elementary School in Sykesville, her job is to order books for the school library, work with teachers, read aloud to students in the school, and share her love of reading and libraries with the community. "One day, one of my students didn't show up because he was getting a biopsy," she recalled. Rivera had been planning a story time at the library that day, and she wished she could somehow bring the experience to the absent student.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 28, 1997
Three Westminster residents were arrested on drug charges after police raided their home in the 300 block of Old New Windsor Road on Wednesday night, authorities said.Police said they confiscated suspected marijuana, crack cocaine, smoking devices, pagers, scales and two loaded semiautomatic pistols, which were found under a mattress, during the search that began at 8: 15 p.m.Released on personal recognizance were:Deborah R. Gaver, 40, on charges of possession of crack cocaine with intent to distribute, and possession of cocaine, marijuana and paraphernalia.
EXPLORE
By Steve Jones | January 12, 2012
There are 28 parks in Carroll County, including five in Westminster. The newest will soon have a name, to be chosen from suggestions by the public. "This is the first time we've had this promotion," said Jeff Degitz, the county's Director of Recreation and Parks. "It's not designed to be a popularity contest," he said. "Over 100 people have submitted ideas, and we've asked each of them to detail why their suggestion would be appropriate for the community. So far, a lot of people have come up with creative ideas and names.
NEWS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1999
As Westminster prepares to beef up its housing-code enforcement, the city has begun administering a loan program to help low-income residents fix up their homes.The Maryland Housing Rehabilitation Program is also administered by the county, but city officials wanted a stronger emphasis on the program. The city recently hired a full-time coordinator to handle the loans for Westminster residents."We have a lot of housing stock that's very old and it's tired. It's owned by people on fixed incomes and there are things they'd like to do but they can't afford it, but they don't want to move," said Ray Fleming, the city's rehabilitation coordinator at the Office of Housing and Community Development, which is running the program.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2004
Two years after a committee of Westminster residents and government representatives came up with recommendations on revitalizing a troubled neighborhood, city officials are going ahead with bringing illumination to a main artery known for its drug activity. The Westminster Common Council unanimously approved a $218,000 bid to install 17 decorative lights on Pennsylvania Avenue from West Main Street to Union Street and in alleys. Thomas B. Beyard, the city's director of planning and public works, told the mayor and council at a meeting Monday night that the original estimate for the project was $374,000 and that receiving such a low bid was unusual.
NEWS
October 16, 2002
Commissioners review proposals for the Assembly The county commissioners reviewed yesterday legislative proposals for the 2003 General Assembly session, including one that would create local police and fire departments. Any legislation would "clarify the commissioners' authority to establish a police force or a fire department should a future board want to," said Kim Millender, county attorney. Other proposals discussed included bond bills for various county projects and subpoena power to the ethics commission.
NEWS
October 21, 1993
Who should be responsible for maintaining trees along Westminster's public thoroughfares -- the city or individual property owners? It's a question the city's Tree Commission must resolve because the City Council could not.Even though Westminster points with pride to its designation as a "Tree City, USA" by the National Arbor Day Foundation for four years running, some residents have complained about the trees the city has planted along the sidewalks that...
NEWS
October 21, 1996
An apparent domestic dispute turned violent shortly after midnight Friday, and ended with a Finksburg man stabbed in the abdomen and a woman treated for injuries from a beating, police and hospital authorities said.Theron Morgan, 34, of the 2600 block of Old Westminster Pike remained at Sinai Hospital yesterday in stable and satisfactory condition, according to hospital spokeswomen.Malynna Clark, 21, of the same address was treated and released at Maryland Shock Trauma Center, spokeswomen said.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 17, 2000
ON SATURDAY, Westminster residents are invited to recognize the artistic talents of their neighbors at "Celebration of the Arts 2000," sponsored by the Carroll County Arts Council and the Westminster Office of Community Development. Central to the celebration will be the dedication of the mural painted in Locust Lane Park by Lewis Schlitt. Work on the mural, which is styled after old European town plans and maps, began in August and was completed at the end of October. "A lot of people are fascinated with old maps," Schlitt said, explaining why he chose to depict the original Westminster town plans on the Locust Lane wall.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | July 5, 2008
Karen Naomi Connolly-Lawless, who helped run the former Connolly's Seafood, her family's restaurant and a Baltimore institution for 87 years, died Wednesday at home of lung cancer. She was 61 and lived in Westminster. Born in Baltimore the only child of Naomi Bond Connolly and Sterling L. Connolly, her first love was art. She graduated from the Maryland Institute College of Art and became a freelance commercial artist, specializing in graphic design for companies throughout Baltimore. "Before computers, she was a master at retouching photos; she was very precise," said her daughter, Karene Smith of Westminster.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | April 17, 2008
Leonard Hubert Bongers, a retired research scientist who later owned an environmental consulting firm, died of a heart attack April 9 at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Westminster resident was 83. Dr. Bongers was born and raised in Weert, Limburg, in the Netherlands. As a student at Wageningen University, he participated in the effort to shore up dikes during the great North Sea flood in 1953 that inundated much of the Netherlands and killed 1,835 people. He earned his doctorate in plant physiology and biosynthesis from Wageningen University and three years later immigrated to Baltimore, when he took a job in the scientific research division of Martin Marietta Corp.
NEWS
October 24, 2004
Anna Sophia Bachman, a former Westminster resident, has "traveled a war zone" while helping the underprivileged and working for peace in the Middle East. She will give a firsthand account of her experiences in a lecture, "Travels in a War Zone: Iraq and Palestine" at 11 a.m. tomorrow in the Scott Center theater at Carroll Community College. As an English teacher at Baghdad University and an environmentalist, Bachman has assisted with aid projects to Fallujah, helped a young Iraqi boy through the ravaged Iraqi health care system and helped the poor with housing issues.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2004
Two years after a committee of Westminster residents and government representatives came up with recommendations on revitalizing a troubled neighborhood, city officials are going ahead with bringing illumination to a main artery known for its drug activity. The Westminster Common Council unanimously approved a $218,000 bid to install 17 decorative lights on Pennsylvania Avenue from West Main Street to Union Street and in alleys. Thomas B. Beyard, the city's director of planning and public works, told the mayor and council at a meeting Monday night that the original estimate for the project was $374,000 and that receiving such a low bid was unusual.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2004
It chimed about 13 times at 9 a.m. as a crew worked on Westminster's 19th-century Main Street clock, but by Monday evening the landmark appeared to be keeping time again. The clock, in the historic firehouse tower downtown, started chiming about a half-hour fast about two weeks ago. That's when residents started calling city officials. So city workers began working last week to fix the Seth Thomas clock, which is more than 100 years old. Jeff Glass, the city's assistant director of public works for streets and utilities, said he had about 10 calls in less than a week.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2003
Prompted by a Girl Scout's desire to join a peaceful protest with the Westminster chapter of Women in Black, the city's Common Council is reconsidering a section in the municipal code that requires permits for groups of fewer than 25 demonstrators. "We want to get an ordinance on the books that will allow for the exercise of First Amendment rights without the fear of violating laws," said Ava E. Lias-Booker, a Baltimore attorney representing three Westminster residents who believe their right to protest is inhibited by the city code.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2003
Prompted by a Girl Scout's desire to join a peaceful protest with the Westminster chapter of Women in Black, the city's Common Council is reconsidering a section in the municipal code that requires permits for groups of fewer than 25 demonstrators. "We want to get an ordinance on the books that will allow for the exercise of First Amendment rights without the fear of violating laws," said Ava E. Lias-Booker, a Baltimore attorney representing three Westminster residents who believe their right to protest is inhibited by the city code.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.