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By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff writer | October 10, 1990
WESTMINSTER - Despite debate on whether the mayor's powers are being stripped, city department heads soon will have a manager who will answer their questions and handle the day-to-day operations of the city.The City Council voted unanimously Monday to create the position, after hearing five representatives from the six-member task force explain their recommendations for hiring a city manager."You owe it to the community and yourselves to hire a city manager," said Carroll Dell, one of six citizens making up the Advisory Task Force Committee on Governmental Administration.
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By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,sun reporter | May 15, 2007
Three incumbents who helped Westminster weather a six-month building moratorium caused by a water deficit easily won new terms yesterday in a municipal election seemingly ignored by the voters. Just 411 of Westminster's 8,468 registered voters - about 5 percent - cast ballots in the election that returned Robert P. Wack, Suzanne P. Albert and L. Gregory Pecoraro to office. They received nearly three times the votes of the nearest three challengers, Charles W. Cull, William Gill and Kenneth Warren, for the three seats up for election on the five-member council.
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NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2005
Responding to more than 100 residents who filled City Hall about a potential development that they said could clog major traffic arteries, deplete limited water resources and overwhelm nearby schools, Westminster council members said annexing the property into the city is up in the air. "This is a question of resources, not zoning," council President Damian L. Halstad told the developers and investors who want the city to annex the 146-acre Hoff/Naganna property,...
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | December 31, 2006
As the Westminster City Council moves closer to banning tattoo parlors from the downtown business district, local practitioners of skin decoration plan to bring Carroll County's first tattoo convention to Westminster late next month. The council could pass the ban before then. City officials said a zoning amendment should be introduced Jan. 8 and go to public hearing Jan. 22, when it could come up for a vote. Tattoo parlors would still be permitted in the industrialized business zone along Route 140, and an existing tattoo business downtown would be allowed to stay open, Mayor Thomas K. Ferguson said.
NEWS
June 9, 1991
The Westminster Council is considering a consultant's recommendationto increase office space with an addition to City Hall and a new building for the Police Department. The previous council had allocated $1.6 million for the project and advocated paying for it up front. Butthe May 13 election brought three new council members, who have taken steps to slow the project. Some council members believe the projectshould be paid for with a bond issue.No one debates that more space is needed. But what form should the expansion take?
NEWS
May 5, 1993
With the retirement of two-term councilman William F. Haifley from the Westminster City Council and with Mayor W. Benjamin Brown running unopposed, the political dynamics of Carroll's largest municipality will be quite different after the city election next Monday.Mr. Haifley proudly represented the old Westminster -- a small town populated by long-time residents with few problems. He only grudgingly acknowledged the influx of new homeowners and made it his practice to oppose most initiatives by Mr. Brown, who attempted to respond to the changing town scene.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2003
Robert D. Miller, Robert D. Miller's plans to build Carroll's first indoor skating rink fell through, but he still says the county seat needs more recreational venues - and, for that matter, more economic development of any kind. "I see Westminster becoming a bedroom community and it'll hurt Westminster if it doesn't get more businesses," says Miller, who is running for a seat on the city's Common Council. Miller, 39, has never run for elected office, but he says it is time for him to do more than sit on the sidelines.
NEWS
May 2, 1995
Westminster's municipal government has hit its stride. Kenneth A. Yowan, since becoming mayor in November, has demonstrated the benefits of collegial governance.The contentious relations a few years ago between the council and W. Benjamin Brown, then the mayor and currently a Carroll County commissioner, are now a memory. Little gestures by Mr. Yowan, such as permitting council members to use his office in Emerald Hill for city business and creating a voice mail system for council members, have eased the conflict between the town's executive and legislative branches.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | December 15, 1995
The Westminster City Council has increased fees that developers of new buildings will pay for water and sewer service to help cover the cost of improvements required because of new construction.But the City Council reduced the fees it will charge developers who renovate existing commercial buildings and then divide them for multiple-tenant use.The council conducted a public hearing at its Nov. 27 meeting, but no one commented on the fee increases.Council members voted Monday night to approve the fee increases.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | October 11, 1992
Westminster's City Council is scheduled to take final actio tomorrow night on the extensively debated proposal to create historic district zoning in the city.The most recent version of the historic district proposal calls for adding it to the zoning ordinance, but not designating any specific area as historic.Adding that category to the zoning law will allow citizens to petition the city for the historic designation, which would prohibit them from making exterior changes that would alter a building's architectural character.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | August 25, 2006
David S. Babylon, a retired accountant who had served for many years on the Westminster Common Council and was known for his detailed knowledge of the city, died of emphysema Tuesday at his home. He was 82. With Carroll County family roots dating back for generations, Mr. Babylon was born in Westminster. He remained in his boyhood home on Willis Street until the end of his life. He was a 1941 graduate of Valley Forge Military Academy, and interrupted his studies at Gettysburg College to enlist in the Army during World War II. He attained the rank of captain.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | May 9, 2006
Spurning the objections of several irate residents, the Westminster city council voted unanimously last night to adopt a $27.1 million budget that will raise property taxes and water and sewer rates for the first time in several years. Several dozen people attended a public hearing that preceded the vote, and several demanded an outside audit of the budget before the rate increases were enacted. To ease the rate increase, the mayor and council approved a 10 percent tax increase, down from the 15 percent originally proposed.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | April 18, 2006
The Westminster city council proposed a 6-cent increase in the property tax rate - perhaps the largest such increase in the city's history - as part of a $27.2 million budget recommended for fiscal 2007 in a work session last night. With soaring costs for staff benefits and water treatment projects, the council recommended an increase in the property tax rate from 40 cents per $100 of assessed value to 46 cents. The city's last property tax rate increase was a 4.8-cent jump four years ago. Council members stressed that they want to enact a budget that avoids deficit spending.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | March 12, 2006
The Westminster City Council is expected to award a $2.1 million contract tomorrow night to renovate West Green Street. The project, which includes reconstructing the road and sidewalks between Liberty Street and New Windsor Road, has been in the works for at least two years, said Thomas B. Beyard, the city's director of planning and public works. The street lacks storm water drains, and West Green Street often floods. "The whole street is like a big river when it rains," said Councilman Robert P. Wack, who lives on the street.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2005
Responding to more than 100 residents who filled City Hall about a potential development that they said could clog major traffic arteries, deplete limited water resources and overwhelm nearby schools, Westminster council members said annexing the property into the city is up in the air. "This is a question of resources, not zoning," council President Damian L. Halstad told the developers and investors who want the city to annex the 146-acre Hoff/Naganna property,...
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2004
The Westminster Common Council last night approved a $730,000 bid to repair city streets worn down by two unusually harsh winters. Hampstead-based C.J. Miller was awarded the city's annual roadway paving contract, said Planning and Public Works Director Thomas B. Beyard. He said the repairs are expected to be completed by mid-November. Beyard said that 19 streets are targeted, including Airport Drive, Tahoma Farm Road, Distillery Lane, Locust Street, Bond Street and Long Valley Road. Staffers rated the city's streets to decide which ones most needed to be repaired.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2003
Robert D. Miller, Robert D. Miller's plans to build Carroll's first indoor skating rink fell through, but he still says the county seat needs more recreational venues - and, for that matter, more economic development of any kind. "I see Westminster becoming a bedroom community and it'll hurt Westminster if it doesn't get more businesses," says Miller, who is running for a seat on the city's Common Council. Miller, 39, has never run for elected office, but he says it is time for him to do more than sit on the sidelines.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2003
Claiming that the Westminster Common Council doesn't reflect the conservative nature of the city and county, Joseph D. Mish Jr. wants to break into what he calls a "closed inner circle" and capture a seat on the panel. "I think people would really like a more conservative voice on the council," Mish said. "Someone who supports fewer regulations and no tax increases and who opposes the additional regulations that produce more red tape." Of the three newcomers running for office in the election May 12, the 63-year-old retired schoolteacher appears to have the greatest name recognition.
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