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NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | August 26, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- Council President William F. Haifley thought he had support for term limits and a resign-to-run requirement for the mayor and council members.He was wrong.The four council members unanimously blocked an ordinance proposed by Mr. Haifley at their Monday meeting. The ordinance would have limited the mayor and council members to two terms, and officeholders would have been required to resign if they decided to run for another office while they had more than one year left in their terms.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2013
Rebecca A. Orenstein, the first woman elected to the Westminster City Council, who was also a Carroll County political and environmental activist, died Aug. 31 of pancreatic cancer at Carroll Hospice Center's Dove House. She was 71. "Rebecca brought a strong feeling for those who might be shut out of the government process or were disenfranchised. She was an advocate for them," said Donna R. Engle, a former Baltimore Sun reporter who covered Ms. Orenstein. "And she would not hesitate to challenge authority or those in power," said Ms. Engle, who is now a retired Carroll County lawyer.
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NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | April 18, 2006
The Westminster city council proposed a 6-cent increase in the property tax rate - perhaps the largest such increase in the city's history - as part of a $27.2 million budget recommended for fiscal 2007 in a work session last night. With soaring costs for staff benefits and water treatment projects, the council recommended an increase in the property tax rate from 40 cents per $100 of assessed value to 46 cents. The city's last property tax rate increase was a 4.8-cent jump four years ago. Council members stressed that they want to enact a budget that avoids deficit spending.
EXPLORE
January 18, 2012
Knorr Brake Corporation on Wednesday, Jan. 18, broke ground on the company's new manufacturing facility in the Westminster Technology Park in Westminster. This new facility will double the existing size of Knorr's manufacturing capabilities in Carroll County, from 120,000 square feet to 236,000 square feet of space. Knorr is a manufacturer of braking, door and HVAC systems for mass transit vehicles. Company officials said that an influx of new orders, primarily from a new series of rail cars for the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, along with other increased business, is driving the expansion.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | March 12, 2006
The Westminster City Council is expected to award a $2.1 million contract tomorrow night to renovate West Green Street. The project, which includes reconstructing the road and sidewalks between Liberty Street and New Windsor Road, has been in the works for at least two years, said Thomas B. Beyard, the city's director of planning and public works. The street lacks storm water drains, and West Green Street often floods. "The whole street is like a big river when it rains," said Councilman Robert P. Wack, who lives on the street.
NEWS
January 27, 1991
The Benchmark Co. of Baltimore has dropped its plans for The Pavilions shopping center at Route 31 and Fenby Farm Road.Robert Fox, Benchmark owner, said he is tired of fighting city hall and the politics involved in trying to put in the center.The firm's proposal for a 128,000-square-foot shopping center wasunanimously killed by the Westminster City Council last September after more than 200 citizens spoke out against it at a public hearing.Although the council said it might consider a smaller shopping plaza, Fox said he was unable to scale down plans for The Pavilions and still have it profitable.
NEWS
October 7, 1992
3/8 TC A Westminster City Council committee recommended the council award Baltimore architects Colimore Clark Associates a contract to design and renovate City Hall and the planned police station.The council may vote Monday night on the recommendation if council members resolve some planning issues.Council President William F. Haifley asked for the special session to renew discussion on whether to install an elevator and create work space for council members as part of modifications to make the building accessible to the disabled.
NEWS
February 23, 1993
The Westminster City Council narrowly agreed last night to put up a 3 percent share to qualify for a federal and state grant to clean up a nameless stream that runs along the railroad tracks through the city.The agreement to spend $5,000 in matching funds in each of the next two fiscal years for the $310,000 grant came over the "no" vote of Councilman Stephen R. Chapin Sr. and objections from Council President William F. Haifley, who votes only to break ties.Mr. Chapin questioned whether the proposal would actually succeed in reducing pollution in the stream.
NEWS
July 27, 1998
PoliceWestminster: A resident of South Court Street reported Thursday that someone stole his bicycle from his residence. Loss is estimated at $200.FiresWestminster: Firefighters from Westminster, Manchester, Reese and Pleasant Valley responded at 7: 42 a.m. Friday to a heater fire in the first block of Pennsylvania Ave. Units were out 20 minutes.Westminster: Firefighters responded at 9: 43 p.m. to a fire alarm on Stoner Avenue. Units were out one hour.Grading permitsWestminster: Carroll County Bank & Trust Co., addition, 410 Englar Road; 7,875 square feet disturbed.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | October 30, 1990
LONDON -- In a day or two, the question before one of Her Majesty's Justices in the High Court of England will be: Does the working class exist any longer in these days of post-industrial affluence?The argument is between the richest and unlikeliest of litigants.Arguing that the working class is still with us is the Duke of Westminster, reputed to be Britain's wealthiest aristocrat.Asserting that the working class went into terminal decline when brightly illuminated shopping malls replaced yesteryear's "dark, satanic mills," is Lady Porter, heiress to a grocery fortune and leader of the Westminster City Council.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | December 31, 2006
As the Westminster City Council moves closer to banning tattoo parlors from the downtown business district, local practitioners of skin decoration plan to bring Carroll County's first tattoo convention to Westminster late next month. The council could pass the ban before then. City officials said a zoning amendment should be introduced Jan. 8 and go to public hearing Jan. 22, when it could come up for a vote. Tattoo parlors would still be permitted in the industrialized business zone along Route 140, and an existing tattoo business downtown would be allowed to stay open, Mayor Thomas K. Ferguson said.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | August 9, 2006
The former deputy housing secretary under Gov. Parris N. Glendening has been tapped for the newly revived position of city administrator in Westminster, Mayor Thomas K. Ferguson announced yesterday. After a five-month search, the Westminster City Council offered the job to Margaret "Marge" Wolf, 60, who also served as Hyattsville's city administrator for nine years and now manages the borough of Kennett Square, Pa. "Marge brings to this job in Westminster, Md., experience in spades," Ferguson said.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | May 9, 2006
Spurning the objections of several irate residents, the Westminster city council voted unanimously last night to adopt a $27.1 million budget that will raise property taxes and water and sewer rates for the first time in several years. Several dozen people attended a public hearing that preceded the vote, and several demanded an outside audit of the budget before the rate increases were enacted. To ease the rate increase, the mayor and council approved a 10 percent tax increase, down from the 15 percent originally proposed.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | April 18, 2006
The Westminster city council proposed a 6-cent increase in the property tax rate - perhaps the largest such increase in the city's history - as part of a $27.2 million budget recommended for fiscal 2007 in a work session last night. With soaring costs for staff benefits and water treatment projects, the council recommended an increase in the property tax rate from 40 cents per $100 of assessed value to 46 cents. The city's last property tax rate increase was a 4.8-cent jump four years ago. Council members stressed that they want to enact a budget that avoids deficit spending.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | April 16, 2006
All five members of the Westminster City Council are displaying a spirit of unity, agreeing with the mayor that the city of 18,000 requires a full-time manager. That position will likely be filled, at a salary in the $100,000 range, as the council meets to trim next year's budget in a work session tomorrow night. Last week, the council and mayor sponsored an ordinance to hire a city administrator. They will vote to approve that position at their April 24 meeting. "No $25-million-a-year business would trust the management of that business to part-time officials," council member Gregory Pecoraro said during last Monday's meeting, referring to the city's annual budget.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | March 12, 2006
The Westminster City Council is expected to award a $2.1 million contract tomorrow night to renovate West Green Street. The project, which includes reconstructing the road and sidewalks between Liberty Street and New Windsor Road, has been in the works for at least two years, said Thomas B. Beyard, the city's director of planning and public works. The street lacks storm water drains, and West Green Street often floods. "The whole street is like a big river when it rains," said Councilman Robert P. Wack, who lives on the street.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | October 29, 1993
The Westminster City Council has agreed to pay the State Highway Administration $116,540 to settle a bill from the West Main Street-Pennsylvania Avenue reconstruction project.The SHA's final offer reduced its original bill by $104,500 and allowed the city to pay in three annual installments, Mayor W. Benjamin Brown reported at the Monday night council meeting.The council opted for the installment plan.City officials initially argued that they didn't owe any additional money after paying a 1991 bill that the SHA had marked "city's final share of costs . . ."
NEWS
March 17, 1995
PUBLIC MEETING* Monday: Westminster City Council will have a meeting at 7 p.m. to discuss the city and unified solid waste bids. A closed meeting on land acquisition will take place afterward. Information: 848-9000.POLICE* Westminster: A 12-year-old East Middle School student was arrested and charged with one count of having a deadly weapon on school property Wednesday. City police were called by school officials and said the youth had a folding knife in a case. The youth was released to his mother and will face trial in juvenile court.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2001
Soaring 92 feet above Main Street, the clock tower atop Westminster Fire Hall has come to be more than just a perch for a Seth-Thomas timepiece and home to a bell that once summoned volunteer firefighters to duty. "It's been a symbol of the city of Westminster for a long time," said Suzanne P. Albert, a Westminster City Council member who launched a successful campaign to save the firehouse's bell when the Fire Department moved to its new building on John Street in 1997. But since its construction in 1896, the tower, with its distinctive octagonal curved roof, has become weathered and worn.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2000
The Westminster Common Council is expected tonight to adopt a $17 million budget for fiscal 2001 that calls for no increase in property taxes but does raise water and sewer rates. Sewer rates would increase by 3 percent and water rates by 5 percent. Both utilities must be self-supporting, city officials said at a work session last month. The council balanced the budget for the next fiscal year, which begins July 1, in April by trimming and delaying some items to eliminate a $952,000 imbalance between budget requests and projected revenue.
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